Log24

Monday, June 1, 2020

A Graveyard Smash: Galois Geometry Meets Nordic Aliens

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:02 PM

See also Vril Chick.

Friday, April 3, 2020

Galois Space

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:58 PM

Galois space” is now a domain name:  galois.space.

Saturday, March 2, 2019

Schoolgirls for Galois

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:09 PM

"My God, it's
full of numbers!"

Saturday, May 5, 2018

Galois Imaginary

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

" Lying at the axis of everything, zero is both real and imaginary. Lovelace was fascinated by zero; as was Gottfried Leibniz, for whom, like mathematics itself, it had a spiritual dimension. It was this that let him to imagine the binary numbers that now lie at the heart of computers: 'the creation of all things out of nothing through God's omnipotence, it might be said that nothing is a better analogy to, or even demonstration of such creation than the origin of numbers as here represented, using only unity and zero or nothing.' He also wrote, 'The imaginary number is a fine and wonderful recourse of the divine spirit, almost an amphibian between being and nonbeing.' "

— A footnote from page 229 of Sydney Padua's
    April 21, 2015, book on Lovelace and Babbage

A related passage —

From The French Mathematician
by Tom Petsinis (Nov. 30, 1998) —

0

I had foreseen it all in precise detail.
One step led inevitably to the next,
like the proof of a shining theorem,
down to the conclusive shot that still echoes
through time and space. 
Facedown in the damp pine needles,
I embraced that fatal sphere
with my whole body. Dreams, memories,
even the mathematics I had cherished
and set down in my last will and testament–
all receded. I am reduced to
a singular point; in an instant
I am transformed to .

i = an imaginary being

Here, on this complex space,
i  am no longer the impetuous youth
who wanted to change the world
first with a formula and then with a flame.
Having learned the meaning of infinite patience,
i  now rise to the text whenever anyone reads 
about Evariste Galois, preferring to remain 
just below the surface, 
like a goldfish nibbling the fringe of a floating leaf.
Ink is more mythical than blood
(unless some ancient poet slit his 
vein and wrote an epic in red):
The text is a two-way mirror 
that allows me to look into
the life and times of the reader. 
Who knows, someday i  may rise
to a text that will compel me 
to push through to the other side.
Do you want proof that i  exist? Where am ?
Beneath every word, behind each letter, 
on the side of a period that will never see the light.

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Galois’s Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:20 PM

(A sequel to Foster's Space and Sawyer's Space)

See posts now tagged Galois's Space.

Sunday, November 19, 2017

Galois Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 PM

This is a sequel to yesterday's post Cube Space Continued.

Saturday, July 8, 2017

Desargues and Galois in Japan

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:00 AM

Related material now available online —

A less business-oriented sort of virtual reality —

Link to 'Desargues via Galois' in Japan

For example, "A very important configuration is obtained by
taking the plane section of a complete space five-point." 
(Veblen and Young, 1910, p. 39)—

'Desargues via Galois' in Japan (via Pinterest)

Saturday, May 20, 2017

van Lint and Wilson Meet the Galois Tesseract*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:12 AM

Click image to enlarge.

The above 35 projective lines, within a 4×4 array —


The above 15 projective planes, within a 4×4 array (in white) —

* See Galois Tesseract  in this journal.

Sunday, August 14, 2016

The Boole-Galois Games

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 5:01 PM

Continued from earlier posts on Boole vs. Galois.

From a Google image search today for “Galois Boole.”
Click the image to enlarge it.

Thursday, June 30, 2016

Rubik vs. Galois: Preconception vs. Pre-conception

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:20 PM

From Psychoanalytic Aesthetics: The British School ,
by Nicola Glover, Chapter 4  —

In his last theoretical book, Attention and Interpretation  (1970), Bion has clearly cast off the mathematical and scientific scaffolding of his earlier writings and moved into the aesthetic and mystical domain. He builds upon the central role of aesthetic intuition and the Keats's notion of the 'Language of Achievement', which

… includes language that is both
a prelude to action and itself a kind of action;
the meeting of psycho-analyst and analysand
is itself an example of this language.29.

Bion distinguishes it from the kind of language which is a substitute  for thought and action, a blocking of achievement which is lies [sic ] in the realm of 'preconception' – mindlessness as opposed to mindfulness. The articulation of this language is possible only through love and gratitude; the forces of envy and greed are inimical to it..

This language is expressed only by one who has cast off the 'bondage of memory and desire'. He advised analysts (and this has caused a certain amount of controversy) to free themselves from the tyranny of the past and the future; for Bion believed that in order to make deep contact with the patient's unconscious the analyst must rid himself of all preconceptions about his patient – this superhuman task means abandoning even the desire to cure . The analyst should suspend memories of past experiences with his patient which could act as restricting the evolution of truth. The task of the analyst is to patiently 'wait for a pattern to emerge'. For as T.S. Eliot recognised in Four Quartets , 'only by the form, the pattern / Can words or music reach/ The stillness'.30. The poet also understood that 'knowledge' (in Bion's sense of it designating a 'preconception' which blocks  thought, as opposed to his designation of a 'pre -conception' which awaits  its sensory realisation), 'imposes a pattern and falsifies'

For the pattern is new in every moment
And every moment is a new and shocking
Valuation of all we have ever been.31.

The analyst, by freeing himself from the 'enchainment to past and future', casts off the arbitrary pattern and waits for new aesthetic form to emerge, which will (it is hoped) transform the content of the analytic encounter.

29. Attention and Interpretation  (Tavistock, 1970), p. 125

30. Collected Poems  (Faber, 1985), p. 194.

31. Ibid., p. 199.

See also the previous posts now tagged Bion.

Preconception  as mindlessness is illustrated by Rubik's cube, and
"pre -conception" as mindfulness is illustrated by n×n×n Froebel  cubes
for n= 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Suitably coordinatized, the Froebel  cubes become Galois  cubes,
and illustrate a new approach to the mathematics of space .

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Galois Space —

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 PM

A very brief introduction:

Seven is Heaven...

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Harmonic Analysis and Galois Spaces

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:59 AM

The above sketch indicates, in a vague, hand-waving, fashion,
a connection between Galois spaces and harmonic analysis.

For more details of the connection, see (for instance) yesterday
afternoon's post Space Oddity.

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Galois.io

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 8:35 AM

The title is a new URL.

Midrash on the URL suffix —

" 'I/O' is a computer term of very long standing
that means 'input/output,' i.e. the means by which
a computer communicates with the outside world.
In a domain name, it's a shibboleth that implies
that the intended audience for a site is other
programmers."

Phil Darnowsky on Dec. 18, 2014

Remarks for a wider audience —

See some Log24 posts related to Dec. 18, 2014.

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Brouwer on the Galois Tesseract

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Yesterday's post suggests a review of the following —

Andries Brouwer, preprint, 1982:

"The Witt designs, Golay codes and Mathieu groups"
(unpublished as of 2013)

Pages 8-9:

Substructures of S(5, 8, 24)

An octad is a block of S(5, 8, 24).

Theorem 5.1

Let B0 be a fixed octad. The 30 octads disjoint from B0
form a self-complementary 3-(16,8,3) design, namely 

the design of the points and affine hyperplanes in AG(4, 2),
the 4-dimensional affine space over F2.

Proof….

… (iv) We have AG(4, 2).

(Proof: invoke your favorite characterization of AG(4, 2) 
or PG(3, 2), say 
Dembowski-Wagner or Veblen & Young. 

An explicit construction of the vector space is also easy….)

Related material:  Posts tagged Priority.

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Euclidean-Galois Interplay

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

For previous remarks on this topic, as it relates to
symmetry axes of the cube, see previous posts tagged Interplay.

The above posts discuss, among other things, the Galois
projective plane of order 3, with 13 points and 13 lines.

Oxley's 2004 drawing of the 13-point projective plane

These Galois points and lines may be modeled in Euclidean geometry
by the 13 symmetry axes and the 13 rotation planes
of the Euclidean cube. They may also be modeled in Galois geometry
by subsets of the 3x3x3 Galois cube (vector 3-space over GF(3)).

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110427-Cube27.jpg

   The 3×3×3 Galois Cube 

Exercise: Is there any such analogy between the 31 points of the
order-5 Galois projective plane and the 31 symmetry axes of the
Euclidean dodecahedron and icosahedron? Also, how may the
31 projective points  be naturally pictured as lines  within the 
5x5x5 Galois cube (vector 3-space over GF(5))?

Update of Nov. 30, 2014 —

For background to the above exercise, see
pp. 16-17 of A Geometrical Picture Book ,
by Burkard Polster (Springer, 1998), esp.
the citation to a 1983 article by Lemay.

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Elementary Galois Geometry

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:29 PM

The image search (2.26 MB).

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Galois Matrices

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:00 PM

The webpage Galois.us, on Galois matrices , has been created as
a starting point for remarks on the algebra  (as opposed to the geometry)
underlying the rings of matrices mentioned in AMS abstract 79T-A37,
Symmetry invariance in a diamond ring.”

See also related historical remarks by Weyl and by Atiyah.

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Classical Galois

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:26 PM

IMAGE- The large Desargues configuration and Desargues's theorem in light of Galois geometry

Click image for more details.

To enlarge image, click here.

Sunday, November 24, 2013

Galois Groups and Harmonic Analysis

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:29 AM

"In 1967, he [Langlands] came up with revolutionary
insights tying together the theory of Galois groups 
and another area of mathematics called harmonic
analysis. These two areas, which seem light years
apart
, turned out to be closely related."

— Edward Frenkel, Love and Math, 2013

"Class field theory expresses Galois groups of
abelian extensions of a number field F
in terms of harmonic analysis on the
multiplicative group of [a] locally compact
topological ring, the adèle ring, attached to F."

— Michael Harris in a description of a Princeton
    mathematics department talk of October 2012

Related material: a Saturday evening post.

See also Wikipedia on the history of class field theory.
For greater depth, see Tate's [1950] thesis and the book
Fourier Analysis on Number Fields .

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Desargues via Galois

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:12 PM

The following image gives a brief description
of the geometry discussed in last spring's
Classical Geometry in Light of Galois Geometry.

IMAGE- The large Desargues configuration in light of Galois geometry

Update of Aug. 7, 2013:  See also an expanded PDF version.

Monday, June 10, 2013

Galois Coordinates

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:30 PM

Today's previous post on coordinate systems
suggests a look at the phrase "Galois coordinates."

A search shows that the phrase, though natural,
has apparently not been used before 2011* for solutions
to what Hermann Weyl called "the relativity problem."

A thorough historical essay on Galois coordinatization
in this sense would require more academic resources
than I have available. It would likely describe a number
of applications of Galois-field coordinates to square
(and perhaps to cubical) arrays that were studied before
1976, the date of my Diamond Theory  monograph.

But such a survey might not  find any such pre-1976
coordinatization of a 4×4 array  by the 16 elements
of the vector 4-space  over the Galois field with two
elements, GF(2).

Such coordinatizations are important because of their
close relationship to the Mathieu group 24 .

See a preprint by Anne Taormina and Katrin Wendland,
"The overarching finite symmetry group of Kummer
surfaces in the Mathieu group 24 ," with its remark
denying knowledge of any such coordinatization
prior to a 1989 paper by R. T. Curtis.

Related material: 

Some images related to Galois coordinates, excerpted
from a Google search today (click to enlarge)—

*  A rather abstract  2011 paper that uses the phrase
   "Galois coordinates" may have some implications 
   for the naive form of the relativity problem
   related to square and cubical arrays.

Saturday, April 13, 2013

Veblen and Young in Light of Galois

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:00 AM

Another in a series of figures illustrating
Desargues's theorem in light of Galois geometry:

IMAGE- Veblen and Young,1910 Desargues illustration, with 2013 Galois-geometry version

See also the original Veblen-Young figure in context.

Sunday, March 10, 2013

Galois Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 5:30 PM

(Continued)

The 16-point affine Galois space:

Further properties of this space:

In Configurations and Squares, see the
discusssion of the Kummer 166 configuration.

Some closely related material:

  • Wolfgang Kühnel,
    "Minimal Triangulations of Kummer Varieties,"
    Abh. Math. Sem. Univ. Hamburg 57, 7-20 (1986).

    For the first two pages, click here.

  • Jonathan Spreer and Wolfgang Kühnel,
    "Combinatorial Properties of the 3 Surface:
    Simplicial Blowups and Slicings,"
    preprint, 26 pages. (2009/10) (pdf).
    (Published in Experimental Math. 20,
    issue 2, 201–216 (2011).)

Monday, March 4, 2013

Occupy Galois Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 AM

Continued from February 27, the day Joseph Frank died

"Throughout the 1940s, he published essays
and criticism in literary journals, and one,
'Spatial Form in Modern Literature'—
a discussion of experimental treatments
of space and time by Eliot, Joyce, Proust,
Pound and others— published in
The Sewanee Review  in 1945, propelled him
to prominence as a theoretician."

— Bruce Weber in this morning's print copy
of The New York Times  (p. A15, NY edition)

That essay is reprinted in a 1991 collection
of Frank's work from Rutgers University Press:

See also Galois Space and Occupy Space in this journal.

Frank was best known as a biographer of Dostoevsky.
A very loosely related reference… in a recent Log24 post,
Freeman Dyson's praise of a book on the history of
mathematics and religion in Russia:

"The intellectual drama will attract readers
who are interested in mystical religion
and the foundations of mathematics.
The personal drama will attract readers
who are interested in a human tragedy
with characters who met their fates with
exceptional courage."

Frank is survived by, among others, his wife, a mathematician.

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Galois Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 6:00 PM

(Continued)

The previous post suggests two sayings:

"There is  such a thing as a Galois space."

— Adapted from Madeleine L'Engle

"For every kind of vampire, there is a kind of cross."

Thomas Pynchon

Illustrations—

(Click to enlarge.)

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

DNA and a Galois Field

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:29 PM

From Ewan Birney's weblog today:

WEDNESDAY, 23 JANUARY 2013

Using DNA as a digital archive media

Today sees the publication in Nature  of “Toward practical high-capacity low-maintenance storage of digital information in synthesised DNA,” a paper spearheaded by my colleague Nick Goldman and in which I played a major part, in particular in the germination of the idea.

Birney appeared in Log24 on Dec. 30, 2012, quoted as follows:

"It is not often anyone will hear the phrase 'Galois field' and 'DNA' together…."

— Birney's weblog on July 3, 2012, "Galois and Sequencing."

Birney's widespread appearance in news articles today about the above Nature  publication suggests a review of the "Galois-field"-"DNA" connection.

See, for instance, the following papers:

  • Gail Rosen and Jeff Moore. "Investigation of Coding Structure in DNA," IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP), Hong Kong, April 2003. [pdf]
  • Gail Rosen. "Finding Near-Periodic DNA Regions using a Finite-Field Framework," 2nd IEEE Genomic Signal Processing Workshop (GENSIPS), Baltimore, MD, May 2004. [pdf]
  • Gail Rosen. "Examining Coding Structure and Redundancy in DNA," IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, Volume 25, Issue 1, January/February 2006. [pdf]

A  Log24 post of Sept. 17, 2012, also mentions the phrases "Galois field" and "DNA" together.

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Cameron vs. Galois

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:00 AM

IMAGE- Peter J. Cameron discusses 'ambiguity' in poety and in mathematics.

See Galois Ambiguity in this  journal.

Sunday, July 29, 2012

The Galois Tesseract

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 PM

(Continued)

The three parts of the figure in today's earlier post "Defining Form"—

IMAGE- Hyperplanes (square and triangular) in PG(3,2), and coordinates for AG(4,2)

— share the same vector-space structure:

   0     c     d   c + d
   a   a + c   a + d a + c + d
   b   b + c   b + d b + c + d
a + b a + b + c a + b + d   a + b + 
  c + d

   (This vector-space a b c d  diagram is from  Chapter 11 of 
    Sphere Packings, Lattices and Groups , by John Horton
    Conway and N. J. A. Sloane, first published by Springer
    in 1988.)

The fact that any  4×4 array embodies such a structure was implicit in
the diamond theorem (February 1979). Any 4×4 array, regarded as
a model of the finite geometry AG(4, 2), may be called a Galois tesseract.
(So called because of the Galois geometry involved, and because the
16 cells of a 4×4 array with opposite edges identified have the same
adjacency pattern as the 16 vertices of a tesseract (see, for instance,
Coxeter's 1950 "Self-Dual Configurations and Regular Graphs," figures
5 and 6).)

A 1982 discussion of a more abstract form of AG(4, 2):

Source:

The above 1982 remarks by Brouwer may or may not have influenced
the drawing of the above 1988 Conway-Sloane diagram.

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Galois Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:01 PM

An example of lines in a Galois space * —

The 35 lines in the 3-dimensional Galois projective space PG(3,2)—

(Click to enlarge.)

There are 15 different individual linear diagrams in the figure above.
These are the points of the Galois space PG(3,2).  Each 3-set of linear diagrams
represents the structure of one of the 35  4×4 arrays and also represents a line
of the projective space.

The symmetry of the linear diagrams accounts for the symmetry of the
840 possible images in the kaleidoscope puzzle.

* For further details on the phrase "Galois space," see
Beniamino Segre's "On Galois Geometries," Proceedings of the
International Congress of Mathematicians, 1958  
[Edinburgh].
(Cambridge U. Press, 1960, 488-499.)

(Update of Jan. 5, 2013— This post has been added to finitegeometry.org.)

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Euclid vs. Galois

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:01 AM

(Continued)

Euclidean square and triangle

Galois square and triangle

Background—

This journal on the date of Hilton Kramer's death,
The Galois Tesseract, and The Purloined Diamond.

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Erlanger and Galois

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 PM

Peter J. Cameron yesterday on Galois

"He was killed in a duel at the age of 20…. His work languished for another 14 years until Liouville published it in his Journal; soon it was recognised as the foundation stone of modern algebra, a position it has never lost."

Here Cameron is discussing Galois theory, a part of algebra. Galois is known also as the founder* of group theory, a more general subject.

Group theory is an essential part of modern geometry as well as of modern algebra—

"In der Galois'schen Theorie, wie hier, concentrirt sich das Interesse auf Gruppen von Änderungen. Die Objecte, auf welche sich die Änderungen beziehen, sind allerdings verschieden; man hat es dort mit einer endlichen Zahl discreter Elemente, hier mit der unendlichen Zahl von Elementen einer stetigen Mannigfaltigkeit zu thun."

— Felix Christian Klein, Erlanger Programm , 1872

("In the Galois theory, as in ours, the interest centres on groups of transformations. The objects to which the transformations are applied are indeed different; there we have to do with a finite number of discrete elements, here with the infinite number of elements in a continuous manifoldness." (Translated by M.W. Haskell, published in Bull. New York Math. Soc. 2, (1892-1893), 215-249))

Related material from Hermann Weyl, Symmetry , Princeton University Press, 1952 (paperback reprint of 1982, pp. 143-144)—

"A field is perhaps the simplest algebraic structure we can invent. Its elements are numbers…. Space is another example of an entity endowed with a structure. Here the elements are points…. What we learn from our whole discussion and what has indeed become a guiding principle in modern mathematics is this lesson: Whenever you have to do with a structure-endowed entity  Σ try to determine is group of automorphisms , the group of those element-wise transformations which leave all structural relations undisturbed. You can expect to gain a deep insight into the constitution of Σ in this way."

For a simple example of a group acting on a field (of 8 elements) that is also a space (of 8 points), see Generating the Octad Generator and Knight Moves.

* Joseph J. Rotman, An Introduction to the Theory of Groups , 4th ed., Springer, 1994, page 2

For Galois

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Tue Oct 25, 2011 08:26 AM [London time]
from the weblog of Peter Cameron

Today is Évariste Galois’ 200th birthday.

The event will be celebrated with the publication of a new transcription
and translation of Galois’ works (edited by Peter M. Neumann)
by the European Mathematical Society. The announcement is here.

Cameron's further remarks are also of interest.

Friday, September 9, 2011

Galois vs. Rubik

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 2:56 PM

(Continued from Abel Prize, August 26)

IMAGE- Elementary Galois Geometry over GF(3)

The situation is rather different when the
underlying Galois field has two rather than
three elements… See Galois Geometry.

Image-- Sugar cube in coffee, from 'Bleu'

The coffee scene from “Bleu”

Related material from this journal:

The Dream of
the Expanded Field

Image-- 4x4 square and 4x4x4 cube

Saturday, September 3, 2011

The Galois Tesseract (continued)

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

A post of September 1, The Galois Tesseract, noted that the interplay
of algebraic and geometric properties within the 4×4 array that forms
two-thirds of the Curtis Miracle Octad Generator (MOG) may first have
been described by Cullinane (AMS abstract 79T-A37, Notices , Feb. 1979).

Here is some supporting material—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110903-Carmichael-Conway-Curtis.jpg

The passage from Carmichael above emphasizes the importance of
the 4×4 square within the MOG.

The passage from Conway and Sloane, in a book whose first edition
was published in 1988, makes explicit the structure of the MOG’s
4×4 square as the affine 4-space over the 2-element Galois field.

The passage from Curtis (1974, published in 1976) describes 35 sets
of four “special tetrads” within the 4×4 square of the MOG. These
correspond to the 35 sets of four parallel 4-point affine planes within
the square. Curtis, however, in 1976 makes no mention of the affine
structure, characterizing his 140 “special tetrads” rather by the parity
of their intersections with the square’s rows and columns.

The affine structure appears in the 1979 abstract mentioned above—

IMAGE- An AMS abstract from 1979 showing how the affine group AGL(4,2) of 322,560 transformations acts on a 4x4 square

The “35 structures” of the abstract were listed, with an application to
Latin-square orthogonality, in a note from December 1978

IMAGE- Projective-space structure and Latin-square orthogonality in a set of 35 square arrays

See also a 1987 article by R. T. Curtis—

Further elementary techniques using the miracle octad generator
, by R. T. Curtis. Abstract:

“In this paper we describe various techniques, some of which are already used by devotees of the art, which relate certain maximal subgroups of the Mathieu group M24, as seen in the MOG, to matrix groups over finite fields. We hope to bring out the wealth of algebraic structure* underlying the device and to enable the reader to move freely between these matrices and permutations. Perhaps the MOG was mis-named as simply an ‘octad generator’; in this paper we intend to show that it is in reality a natural diagram of the binary Golay code.”

(Received July 20 1987)

Proceedings of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society (Series 2) (1989), 32: 345-353

* For instance:

Algebraic structure in the 4x4 square, by Cullinane (1985) and Curtis (1987)

Update of Sept. 4— This post is now a page at finitegeometry.org.

Thursday, September 1, 2011

The Galois Tesseract

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:11 PM

Click to enlarge

IMAGE- The Galois Tesseract, 1979-1999

IMAGE- Review of Conway and Sloane's 'Sphere Packings...' by Rota

Monday, June 27, 2011

Galois Cube Revisited

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:00 PM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110427-Cube27.jpg
   The 3×3×3 Galois Cube

    See Unity and Multiplicity.

   This cube, unlike Rubik's, is a
    purely mathematical structure.

    Its properties may be compared
    with those of the order-2  Galois
    cube (of eight subcubes, or
    elements ) and the order-4  Galois
    cube (of 64 elements). The
    order-3  cube (of 27 elements)
    lacks, because it is based on
    an odd  prime, the remarkable
    symmetry properties of its smaller
    and larger cube neighbors.

Saturday, November 6, 2010

Galois Field of Dreams, continued

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Hollywood Reporter Exclusive

Martin Sheen Caught in
Spider-Man's Web

King's Moves

lux in tenebris lucet…"

Sally Field is in early talks
to play Aunt May.

Related material:

Birthdays in this journal,
Galois Field of Dreams,
and Class of 64.

Friday, September 17, 2010

The Galois Window

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 5:01 AM

Yesterday’s excerpt from von Balthasar supplies some Catholic aesthetic background for Galois geometry.

That approach will appeal to few mathematicians, so here is another.

Euclid’s Window: The Story of Geometry from Parallel Lines to Hyperspace  is a book by Leonard Mlodinow published in 2002.

More recently, Mlodinow is the co-author, with Stephen Hawking, of The Grand Design  (published on September 7, 2010).

A review of Mlodinow’s book on geometry—

“This is a shallow book on deep matters, about which the author knows next to nothing.”
— Robert P. Langlands, Notices of the American Mathematical Society,  May 2002

The Langlands remark is an apt introduction to Mlodinow’s more recent work.

It also applies to Martin Gardner’s comments on Galois in 2007 and, posthumously, in 2010.

For the latter, see a Google search done this morning—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/100917-GardnerGalois.jpg

Here, for future reference, is a copy of the current Google cache of this journal’s “paged=4” page.

Note the link at the bottom of the page in the May 5, 2010, post to Peter J. Cameron’s web journal. Following the link, we find…

For n=4, there is only one factorisation, which we can write concisely as 12|34, 13|24, 14|23. Its automorphism group is the symmetric group S4, and acts as S3 on the set of three partitions, as we saw last time; the group of strong automorphisms is the Klein group.

This example generalises, by taking the factorisation to consist of the parallel classes of lines in an affine space over GF(2). The automorphism group is the affine group, and the group of strong automorphisms is its translation subgroup.

See also, in this  journal, Window and Window, continued (July 5 and 6, 2010).

Gardner scoffs at the importance of Galois’s last letter —

Galois had written several articles on group theory, and was
merely annotating and correcting those earlier published papers.”
Last Recreations, page 156

For refutations, see the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society  in March 1899 and February 1909.

Monday, June 14, 2010

Birkhoff on the Galois “Theory of Ambiguity”

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:48 PM

The Principle of Sufficient Reason

by George David Birkhoff

from "Three Public Lectures on Scientific Subjects,"
delivered at the Rice Institute, March 6, 7, and 8, 1940

EXCERPT 1—

My primary purpose will be to show how a properly formulated
Principle of Sufficient Reason plays a fundamental
role in scientific thought and, furthermore, is to be regarded
as of the greatest suggestiveness from the philosophic point
of view.2

In the preceding lecture I pointed out that three branches
of philosophy, namely Logic, Aesthetics, and Ethics, fall
more and more under the sway of mathematical methods.
Today I would make a similar claim that the other great
branch of philosophy, Metaphysics, in so far as it possesses
a substantial core, is likely to undergo a similar fate. My
basis for this claim will be that metaphysical reasoning always
relies on the Principle of Sufficient Reason, and that
the true meaning of this Principle is to be found in the
Theory of Ambiguity” and in the associated mathematical
“Theory of Groups.”

If I were a Leibnizian mystic, believing in his “preestablished
harmony,” and the “best possible world” so
satirized by Voltaire in “Candide,” I would say that the
metaphysical importance of the Principle of Sufficient Reason
and the cognate Theory of Groups arises from the fact that
God thinks multi-dimensionally3 whereas men can only
think in linear syllogistic series, and the Theory of Groups is

2 As far as I am aware, only Scholastic Philosophy has fully recognized and ex-
ploited this principle as one of basic importance for philosophic thought

3 That is, uses multi-dimensional symbols beyond our grasp.
______________________________________________________________________

the appropriate instrument of thought to remedy our deficiency
in this respect.

The founder of the Theory of Groups was the mathematician
Evariste Galois. At the end of a long letter written in
1832 on the eve of a fatal duel, to his friend Auguste
Chevalier, the youthful Galois said in summarizing his
mathematical work,4 “You know, my dear Auguste, that
these subjects are not the only ones which I have explored.
My chief meditations for a considerable time have been
directed towards the application to transcendental Analysis
of the theory of ambiguity. . . . But I have not the time, and
my ideas are not yet well developed in this field, which is
immense.” This passage shows how in Galois’s mind the
Theory of Groups and the Theory of Ambiguity were
interrelated.5

Unfortunately later students of the Theory of Groups
have all too frequently forgotten that, philosophically
speaking, the subject remains neither more nor less than the
Theory of Ambiguity. In the limits of this lecture it is only
possible to elucidate by an elementary example the idea of a
group and of the associated ambiguity.

Consider a uniform square tile which is placed over a
marked equal square on a table. Evidently it is then impossible
to determine without further inspection which one
of four positions the tile occupies. In fact, if we designate
its vertices in order by A, B, C, D, and mark the corresponding
positions on the table, the four possibilities are for the
corners A, B, C, D of the tile to appear respectively in the
positions A, B, C, D;  B, C, D, A;  C, D, A, B; and D, A, B, C.
These are obtained respectively from the first position by a

4 My translation.
5 It is of interest to recall that Leibniz was interested in ambiguity to the extent
of using a special notation v (Latin, vel ) for “or.” Thus the ambiguously defined
roots 1, 5 of x2-6x+5=0 would be written x = l v 5 by him.
______________________________________________________________________

null rotation ( I ), by a rotation through 90° (R), by a rotation
through 180° (S), and by a rotation through 270° (T).
Furthermore the combination of any two of these rotations
in succession gives another such rotation. Thus a rotation R
through 90° followed by a rotation S through 180° is equivalent
to a single rotation T through 270°, Le., RS = T. Consequently,
the "group" of four operations I, R, S, T has
the "multiplication table" shown here:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100614-BirkhoffTable.jpg
This table fully characterizes the group, and shows the exact
nature of the underlying ambiguity of position.
More generally, any collection of operations such that
the resultant of any two performed in succession is one of
them, while there is always some operation which undoes
what any operation does, forms a "group."
__________________________________________________

EXCERPT 2—

Up to the present point my aim has been to consider a
variety of applications of the Principle of Sufficient Reason,
without attempting any precise formulation of the Principle
itself. With these applications in mind I will venture to
formulate the Principle and a related Heuristic Conjecture
in quasi-mathematical form as follows:

PRINCIPLE OF SUFFICIENT REASON. If there appears
in any theory T a set of ambiguously determined ( i e .
symmetrically entering) variables, then these variables can themselves
be determined only to the extent allowed by the corresponding
group G. Consequently any problem concerning these variables
which has a uniquely determined solution, must itself be
formulated so as to be unchanged by the operations of the group
G ( i e . must involve the variables symmetrically).

HEURISTIC CONJECTURE. The final form of any
scientific theory T is: (1) based on a few simple postulates; and
(2) contains an extensive ambiguity, associated symmetry, and
underlying group G, in such wise that, if the language and laws
of the theory of groups be taken for granted, the whole theory T
appears as nearly self-evident in virtue of the above Principle.

The Principle of Sufficient Reason and the Heuristic Conjecture,
as just formulated, have the advantage of not involving
excessively subjective ideas, while at the same time
retaining the essential kernel of the matter.

In my opinion it is essentially this principle and this
conjecture which are destined always to operate as the basic
criteria for the scientist in extending our knowledge and
understanding of the world.

It is also my belief that, in so far as there is anything
definite in the realm of Metaphysics, it will consist in further
applications of the same general type. This general conclu-
sion may be given the following suggestive symbolic form:

Image-- Birkhoff diagram relating Galois's theory of ambiguity to metaphysics

While the skillful metaphysical use of the Principle must
always be regarded as of dubious logical status, nevertheless
I believe it will remain the most important weapon of the
philosopher.

___________________________________________________________________________

A more recent lecture on the same subject —

"From Leibniz to Quantum World:
Symmetries, Principle of Sufficient Reason
and Ambiguity in the Sense of Galois
"

by Jean-Pierre Ramis (Johann Bernoulli Lecture at U. of Groningen, March 2005)

Monday, May 31, 2010

Memorial for Galois

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:16 PM

… and for Louise Bourgeois

Image-- Louise Bourgeois, sculptor of giant spiders, dies at 98

"The épateurs  were as boring as the bourgeois,
two halves of one dreariness."

— D. H. Lawrence, The Plumed Serpent

Image-- Google 5/31/2010 search for 'eightfold geometry' yields page on mother goddess as spider figure, also pages on some actual geometry

Sunday, May 30, 2010

A Post for Galois

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:00 PM

Evariste Galois, 1811-1832 (Vita Mathematica, V. 11)

  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Birkhäuser Basel; 1 edition (December 6, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 3764354100
  • ISBN-13: 978-3764354107
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #933,939 in Books

Awarded 5 stars by Christopher G. Robinson (Cambridge, MA USA).
See also other reviews by Robinson.

Galois was shot in a duel on today's date, May 30, in 1832. Related material for those who prefer entertainment to scholarship—

"It is a melancholy pleasure that what may be [Martin] Gardner’s last published piece, a review of Amir Alexander’s Duel at Dawn: Heroes, Martyrs & the Rise of Modern Mathematics, will appear next week in our June issue." —Roger Kimball of The New Criterion, May 23, 2010.

Today is, incidentally, the feast day of St. Joan of Arc, Die Jungfrau von Orleans. (See "against stupidity" in this journal.)

Sunday, March 21, 2010

Galois Field of Dreams

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 10:01 AM

It is well known that the seven (22 + 2 +1) points of the projective plane of order 2 correspond to 2-point subspaces (lines) of the linear 3-space over the two-element field Galois field GF(2), and may be therefore be visualized as 2-cube subsets of the 2×2×2 cube.

Similarly, recent posts* have noted that the thirteen (32 + 3 + 1) points of the projective plane of order 3 may be seen as 3-cube subsets in the 3×3×3 cube.

The twenty-one (42 + 4 +1) points of the (unique) projective plane of order 4 may also be visualized as subsets of a cube– in this case, the 4×4×4 cube. This visualization is somewhat more complicated than the 3×3×3 case, since the 4×4×4 cube has no central subcube, and each projective-plane point corresponds to four, not three, subcubes.

These three cubes, with 8, 27, and 64 subcubes, thus serve as geometric models in a straightforward way– first as models of finite linear spaces, hence as models for small Galois geometries derived from the linear spaces. (The cubes with 8 and 64 subcubes also serve in a less straightforward, and new, way as finite-geometry models– see The Eightfold Cube, Block Designs, and Solomon's Cube.)

A group of collineations** of the 21-point plane is one of two nonisomorphic simple groups of order 20,160. The other is the linear group acting on the linear 4-space over the two-element Galois field  GF(2). The 1899 paper establishing the nonisomorphism notes that "the expression Galois Field is perhaps not yet in general use."

Coordinates of the 4×4×4 cube's subcubes can, of course, be regarded as elements of the Galois field GF(64).

The preceding remarks were purely mathematical. The "dreams" of this post's title are not. See…

Number and Time, by Marie-Louise von Franz

See also Geometry of the I Ching and a search in this journal for "Galois + Ching."

* February 27 and March 13

** G20160 in Mitchell 1910,  LF(3,22) in Edge 1965

— Mitchell, Ulysses Grant, "Geometry and Collineation Groups
   of the Finite Projective Plane PG(2,22),"
   Princeton Ph.D. dissertation (1910)

— Edge, W. L., "Some Implications of the Geometry of
   the 21-Point Plane," Math. Zeitschr. 87, 348-362 (1965)

Friday, September 11, 2020

Kauffman on Algebra

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:07 PM

Kauffman‘s fixation on the work of Spencer-Brown is perhaps in part
due to Kauffman’s familiarity with Boolean algebra and his ignorance of
Galois geometry.  See other posts now tagged Boole vs. Galois.

Detail, 8/14/2016 Google image search for 'Galois Boole'

See also “A Four-Color Epic” (April 16, 2020).

Saturday, June 27, 2020

Blank Memorial

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:00 PM

This is a continuation of the “just seventeen” posts.

Saturday, May 30, 2020

MAA News

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:07 AM

In other news . . .

Another red book for Stephanie —

Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Introduction to Cyberspace

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:38 PM

Or approaching.

On the Threshold:

Click the search result above for the July 1982 Omni 
story that introduced into fiction the term “cyberspace.”

Part of a page from the original Omni  version  —

For some other  kinds of space, see my  notes from the 1980’s.

Some related remarks on space (and illustrated clams) —

— George Steiner, “A Death of Kings,” The New Yorker ,
September 7, 1968, pp. 130 ff. The above is from p. 133.

See also Steiner on space, algebra, and Galois.

Wednesday, April 15, 2020

Death Warmed Over

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:01 PM

In memory of the author of  My Time in Space * —

Tim Robinson, who reportedly died on April 3 —

 See also an image from a Log24 post, Gray Space

Related material from Robinson’s reported date of death —

* First edition, hardcover, Lilliput Press, Ireland, April 1, 2001.

Saturday, April 4, 2020

A Schicksalstag for the Author of The Eight

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:57 PM

 

Thursday, April 2, 2020

Pattern

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:59 PM

See also Plan 9 from Yale
and Galois Desargues.

Saturday, March 7, 2020

The “Octad Group” as Symmetries of the 4×4 Square

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:32 PM

From “Mathieu Moonshine and Symmetry Surfing” —

(Submitted on 29 Sep 2016, last revised 22 Jan 2018)
by Matthias R. Gaberdiel (1), Christoph A. Keller (2),
and Hynek Paul (1)

(1)  Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich
(2)  Department of Mathematics, ETH Zurich

https://arxiv.org/abs/1609.09302v2 —

“This presentation of the symmetry groups Gi  is
particularly well-adapted for the symmetry surfing
philosophy. In particular it is straightforward to
combine them into an overarching symmetry group G
by combining all the generators. The resulting group is
the so-called octad group

G = (Z2)4  A8 .

It can be described as a maximal subgroup of M24
obtained by the setwise stabilizer of a particular
‘reference octad’ in the Golay code, which we take
to be O= {3,5,6,9,15,19,23,24} ∈ 𝒢24. The octad
subgroup is of order 322560, and its index in M24
is 759, which is precisely the number of
different reference octads one can choose.”

This “octad group” is in fact the symmetry group of the affine 4-space over GF(2),
so described in 1979 in connection not with the Golay code but with the geometry
of the 4×4 square.* Its nature as an affine group acting on the Golay code was
known long before 1979, but its description as an affine group acting on
the 4×4 square may first have been published in connection with the
Cullinane diamond theorem and Abstract 79T-A37, “Symmetry invariance in a
diamond ring
,” by Steven H. Cullinane in Notices of the American Mathematical
Society
, February 1979, pages A-193, 194.

* The Galois tesseract .

Update of March 15, 2020 —

Conway and Sloane on the “octad group” in 1993 —

Thursday, March 5, 2020

“Generated by Reflections”

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:42 PM

See the title in this journal.

Such generation occurs both in Euclidean space 

Order-8 group generated by reflections in midplanes of cube parallel to faces

… and in some Galois spaces —

Generating permutations for the Klein simple group of order 168 acting on the eightfold cube .

In Galois spaces, some care must be taken in defining "reflection."

Monday, February 24, 2020

Hidden Figure

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:55 PM
 

"There is  such a thing as  ▦  ."

— Saying adapted from a 1962 young-adult novel.

Friday, February 21, 2020

Frozen

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:30 PM

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Very Stable Kool-Aid

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:16 PM

Two of the thumbnail previews
from yesterday's 1 AM  post

"Hum a few bars"

"For 6 Prescott Street"

Further down in the "6 Prescott St." post, the link 5 Divinity Avenue
leads to

A Letter from Timothy Leary, Ph.D., July 17, 1961

Harvard University
Department of Social Relations
Center for Research in Personality
Morton Prince House
5 Divinity Avenue
Cambridge 38, Massachusetts

July 17, 1961

Dr. Thomas S. Szasz
c/o Upstate Medical School
Irving Avenue
Syracuse 10, New York

Dear Dr. Szasz:

Your book arrived several days ago. I've spent eight hours on it and realize the task (and joy) of reading it has just begun.

The Myth of Mental Illness is the most important book in the history of psychiatry.

I know it is rash and premature to make this earlier judgment. I reserve the right later to revise and perhaps suggest it is the most important book published in the twentieth century.

It is great in so many ways–scholarship, clinical insight, political savvy, common sense, historical sweep, human concern– and most of all for its compassionate, shattering honesty.

. . . .

The small Morton Prince House in the above letter might, according to
the above-quoted remarks by Corinna S. Rohse, be called a "jewel box."
Harvard moved it in 1978 from Divinity Avenue to its current location at
6 Prescott Street.

Related "jewel box" material for those who
prefer narrative to mathematics —

"In The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test , Tom Wolfe writes about encountering 
'a young psychologist,' 'Clifton Fadiman’s nephew, it turned out,' in the
waiting room of the San Mateo County jail. Fadiman and his wife were
'happily stuffing three I-Ching coins into some interminable dense volume*
of Oriental mysticism' that they planned to give Ken Kesey, the Prankster-
in-Chief whom the FBI had just nabbed after eight months on the lam.
Wolfe had been granted an interview with Kesey, and they wanted him to
tell their friend about the hidden coins. During this difficult time, they
explained, Kesey needed oracular advice."

— Tim Doody in The Morning News  web 'zine on July 26, 2012**

Oracular advice related to yesterday evening's
"jewel box" post …

A 4-dimensional hypercube H (a tesseract ) has 24 square
2-dimensional faces
.  In its incarnation as a Galois  tesseract
(a 4×4 square array of points for which the appropriate transformations
are those of the affine 4-space over the finite (i.e., Galois) two-element
field GF(2)), the 24 faces transform into 140 4-point "facets." The Galois 
version of H has a group of 322,560 automorphisms. Therefore, by the
orbit-stabilizer theorem, each of the 140 facets of the Galois version has
a stabilizer group of  2,304 affine transformations.

Similar remarks apply to the I Ching  In its incarnation as  
a Galois hexaract , for which the symmetry group — the group of
affine transformations of the 6-dimensional affine space over GF(2) —
has not 322,560 elements, but rather 1,290,157,424,640.

* The volume Wolfe mentions was, according to Fadiman, the I Ching.

** See also this  journal on that date — July 26, 2012.

Monday, January 27, 2020

Jewel Box

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:02 PM

The phrase "jewel box" in a New York Times  obituary online this afternoon
suggests a review. See "And He Built a Crooked House" and Galois Tesseract.

Monday, December 2, 2019

Aesthetics at Harvard

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 4:05 PM

"What the piece of art is about is the gray space in the middle."

— David Bowie, as quoted in the above Crimson  piece.

Bowie's "gray space" is the space between the art and the beholder.

I prefer the gray space in the following figure —

Some small Galois spaces (the Cullinane models)

Context:  The Trinity Stone  (Log24, June 4, 2018).

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Battle Song

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:53 AM

Catch 22 song: 'Straighten Up and Fly Right'

Friday, August 16, 2019

Nocciolo

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 10:45 AM

(Continued)

IMAGE- 'Nocciolo': A 'kernel' for Pascal's Hexagrammum Mysticum: The 15 2-subsets of a 6-set as points in a Galois geometry.

A revision of the above diagram showing
the Galois-addition-table structure —

Related tables from August 10

See "Schoolgirl Space Revisited."

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Putting the Structure  in Structuralism

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:34 PM

The Matrix of Lévi-Strauss —

(From his “Structure and Form: Reflections on a Work by Vladimir Propp.”
Translated from a 1960 work in French. It appeared in English as
Chapter VIII of Structural Anthropology, Volume 2  (U. of Chicago Press, 1976).
Chapter VIII was originally published in Cahiers de l’Institut de Science
Économique Appliquée 
, No. 9 (Series M, No. 7) (Paris: ISEA, March 1960).)

The structure  of the matrix of Lévi-Strauss —

Illustration from Diamond Theory , by Steven H. Cullinane (1976).

The relevant field of mathematics is not Boolean algebra, but rather
Galois geometry.

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Schoolgirl Problem

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:18 PM

Anonymous remarks on the schoolgirl problem at Wikipedia —

"This solution has a geometric interpretation in connection with 
Galois geometry and PG(3,2). Take a tetrahedron and label its
vertices as 0001, 0010, 0100 and 1000. Label its six edge centers
as the XOR of the vertices of that edge. Label the four face centers
as the XOR of the three vertices of that face, and the body center
gets the label 1111. Then the 35 triads of the XOR solution correspond
exactly to the 35 lines of PG(3,2). Each day corresponds to a spread
and each week to a packing
."

See also Polster + Tetrahedron in this  journal.

There is a different "geometric interpretation in connection with
Galois geometry and PG(3,2)" that uses a square  model rather
than a tetrahedral  model. The square  model of PG(3,2) last
appeared in the schoolgirl-problem article on Feb. 11, 2017, just
before a revision that removed it.

Battlefield Geometry

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:40 PM

Mind game on the birthday of Évariste Galois:

Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Depth Psychology Meets Inscape Geometry

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:00 AM

An illustration from the previous post may be interpreted
as an attempt to unbokeh  an inscape

The 15 lines above are Euclidean  lines based on pairs within a six-set. 
For examples of Galois  lines so based, see Six-Set Geometry:

Sunday, June 16, 2019

Master Plan from Outer Space

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

IMAGE- The large Desargues configuration and Desargues's theorem in light of Galois geometry

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Geometry of Interstices

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 10:18 PM

Finite Galois geometry with the underlying field the simplest one possible —
namely, the two-element field GF(2) — is a geometry of  interstices :

For some less precise remarks, see the tags Interstice and Interality.

The rationalist motto "sincerity, order, logic and clarity" was quoted
by Charles Jencks in the previous post.

This  post was suggested by some remarks from Queensland that
seem to exemplify these qualities —

Monday, March 11, 2019

Ant-Man Meets Doctor Strange

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:22 PM

IMAGE- Concepts of Space

The 4×4 square may also be called the Galois Tesseract .
By analogy, the 4x4x4 cube may be called the Galois Hexeract .

"Think outside the tesseract.

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Wikipedia Scholarship

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:31 PM

Cullinane's Square Model of PG(3,2)

Besides omitting the name Cullinane, the anonymous Wikipedia author
also omitted the step of representing the hypercube by a 4×4 array —
an array called in this  journal a Galois  tesseract.

Fooling

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:12 AM

Galois (i.e., finite) fields described as 'deep modern algebra'

IMAGE- History of Mathematics in a Nutshell

The two books pictured above are From Discrete to Continuous ,
by Katherine Neal, and Geometrical Landscapes , by Amir Alexander.

Note: There is no Galois (i.e., finite) field with six elements, but
the theory  of finite fields underlies applications of six-set geometry.

Sunday, February 10, 2019

Cold Open

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:25 PM

The previous post, on the Bauhaus 100th anniversary, suggests a review . . .

"Congratulations to the leaders of both parties:
The past 20 years you’ve taken us far.
We’re entering Weimar, baby."

Peggy Noonan in The Wall Street Journal
 
   on August 13, 2015
 

Image from yesterday's Log24 search Bauhaus Space.

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Toy Story Continues.

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:13 AM

Takeuchi, Miami 2018- Spekkens's Toy Model and Vector Spaces over Galois Fields

See also Spekkens in this  journal.

Sunday, December 9, 2018

Quaternions in a Small Space

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:00 PM

The previous post, on the 3×3 square in ancient China,
suggests a review of group actions on that square
that include the quaternion group.

Click to enlarge

Three links from the above finitegeometry.org webpage on the
quaternion group —

Related material —

Iain Aitchison on the 'symmetric generation' of R. T. Curtis

See as well the two Log24 posts of December 1st, 2018 —

Character and In Memoriam.

Sunday, December 2, 2018

Symmetry at Hiroshima

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:43 AM

A search this morning for articles mentioning the Miracle Octad Generator
of R. T. Curtis within the last year yielded an abstract for two talks given
at Hiroshima on March 8 and 9, 2018

http://www.math.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/
branched/files/2018/abstract/Aitchison.txt

Iain AITCHISON

Title:

Construction of highly symmetric Riemann surfaces, related manifolds, and some exceptional objects, I, II

Abstract:

Since antiquity, some mathematical objects have played a special role, underpinning new mathematics as understanding deepened. Perhaps archetypal are the Platonic polyhedra, subsequently related to Platonic idealism, and the contentious notion of existence of mathematical reality independent of human consciousness.

Exceptional or unique objects are often associated with symmetry – manifest or hidden. In topology and geometry, we have natural base points for the moduli spaces of closed genus 2 and 3 surfaces (arising from the 2-fold branched cover of the sphere over the 6 vertices of the octahedron, and Klein’s quartic curve, respectively), and Bring’s genus 4 curve arises in Klein’s description of the solution of polynomial equations of degree greater than 4, as well as in the construction of the Horrocks-Mumford bundle. Poincare’s homology 3-sphere, and Kummer’s surface in real dimension 4 also play special roles.

In other areas: we have the exceptional Lie algebras such as E8; the sporadic finite simple groups; the division algebras: Golay’s binary and ternary codes; the Steiner triple systems S(5,6,12) and S(5,8,24); the Leech lattice; the outer automorphisms of the symmetric group S6; the triality map in dimension 8; and so on. We also note such as: the 27 lines on a cubic, the 28 bitangents of a quartic curve, the 120 tritangents of a sextic curve, and so on, related to Galois’ exceptional finite groups PSL2(p) (for p= 5,7,11), and various other so-called `Arnol’d Trinities’.

Motivated originally by the `Eightfold Way’ sculpture at MSRI in Berkeley, we discuss inter-relationships between a selection of these objects, illustrating connections arising via highly symmetric Riemann surface patterns. These are constructed starting with a labeled polygon and an involution on its label set.

Necessarily, in two lectures, we will neither delve deeply into, nor describe in full, contexts within which exceptional objects arise. We will, however, give sufficient definition and detail to illustrate essential inter-connectedness of those exceptional objects considered.

Our starting point will be simplistic, arising from ancient Greek ideas underlying atomism, and Plato’s concepts of space. There will be some overlap with a previous talk on this material, but we will illustrate with some different examples, and from a different philosophical perspective.

Some new results arising from this work will also be given, such as an alternative graphic-illustrated MOG (Miracle Octad Generator) for the Steiner system S(5,8,24), and an alternative to Singerman – Jones’ genus 70 Riemann surface previously proposed as a completion of an Arnol’d Trinity. Our alternative candidate also completes a Trinity whose two other elements are Thurston’s highly symmetric 6- and 8-component links, the latter related by Thurston to Klein’s quartic curve.

See also yesterday morning’s post, “Character.”

Update: For a followup, see the next  Log24 post.

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Logos

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:21 PM

(Continued)

Musical accompaniment from Sunday morning

'The Eddington Song'

Update of Nov. 21 —

The reader may contrast the above Squarespace.com logo
(a rather serpentine version of the acronym SS) with a simpler logo
for a square space (the Galois window ):

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Plan 9 from Inner Space

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:57 AM

Click the image for some context.

Monday, October 15, 2018

History at Bellevue

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:38 PM

The previous post, "Tesserae for a Tesseract," contains the following
passage from a 1987 review of a book about Finnegans Wake

"Basically, Mr. Bishop sees the text from above
and as a whole — less as a sequential story than
as a box of pied type or tesserae for a mosaic,
materials for a pattern to be made."

A set of 16 of the Wechsler cubes below are tesserae that 
may be used to make patterns in the Galois tesseract.

Another Bellevue story —

“History, Stephen said, is a nightmare
from which I am trying to awake.”

— James Joyce, Ulysses

For Zingari Shoolerim*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:19 PM

IMAGE- Site with keywords 'Galois space, Galois geometry, finite geometry' at DiamondSpace.net

The structure at top right is that of the
ROMA-ORAM-MARO-AMOR square
in the previous post.

* "Zingari shoolerim" is from
    Finnegans Wake .

Saturday, September 29, 2018

“Ikonologie des Zwischenraums”

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:29 AM

The title is from Warburg. The Zwischenraum  lines and shaded "cuts"
below are to be added together in characteristic two, i.e., via the
set-theoretic symmetric difference  operator.

Some small Galois spaces (the Cullinane models)

Friday, September 14, 2018

Denkraum

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180914-Warburg_Denkraum-Google-result.jpg

I Ching Geometry search result

Underlying the I Ching  structure  is the finite affine space
of six dimensions over the Galois field with two elements.

In this field,  "1 + 1 = 0,"  as noted here Wednesday.

See also other posts now tagged  Interstice.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180914-Warburg-Wikipedia.jpg

Sunday, September 9, 2018

Plan 9 Continues.

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

"The role of Desargues's theorem was not understood until
the Desargues configuration was discovered. For example,
the fundamental role of Desargues's theorem in the coordinatization
of synthetic projective geometry can only be understood in the light
of the Desargues configuration.

Thus, even as simple a formal statement as Desargues's theorem
is not quite what it purports to be. The statement of Desargues's theorem
pretends to be definitive, but in reality it is only the tip of an iceberg
of connections with other facts of mathematics."

— From p. 192 of "The Phenomenology of Mathematical Proof,"
by Gian-Carlo Rota, in Synthese , Vol. 111, No. 2, Proof and Progress
in Mathematics
(May, 1997), pp. 183-196. Published by: Springer.

Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/20117627.

Related figures —

Note the 3×3 subsquare containing the triangles ABC, etc.

"That in which space itself is contained" — Wallace Stevens

Monday, August 27, 2018

Geometry and Simplicity

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:27 PM

From

Thinking in Four Dimensions
By Dusa McDuff

"I’ve got the rather foolhardy idea of trying to explain
to you the kind of mathematics I do, and the kind of
ideas that seem simple to me. For me, the search
for simplicity is almost synonymous with the search
for structure.

I’m a geometer and topologist, which means that
I study the structure of space
. . . .

In each dimension there is a simplest space
called Euclidean space … "

— In Roman Kossak, ed.,
Simplicity:  Ideals of Practice in Mathematics and the Arts
(Kindle Locations 705-710, 735). Kindle Edition.

For some much simpler spaces of various
dimensions, see Galois Space in this journal.

Some small Galois spaces (the Cullinane models)

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180827-Simplicity-Springer-April_2013_conference.jpg

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Taken In

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 9:36 AM

A passage that may or may not have influenced Madeleine L’Engle’s
writings about the tesseract :

From Mere Christianity , by C. S. Lewis (1952) —

“Book IV – Beyond Personality:
or First Steps in the Doctrine of the Trinity”
. . . .

I warned you that Theology is practical. The whole purpose for which we exist is to be thus taken into the life of God. Wrong ideas about what that life is, will make it harder. And now, for a few minutes, I must ask you to follow rather carefully.

You know that in space you can move in three ways—to left or right, backwards or forwards, up or down. Every direction is either one of these three or a compromise between them. They are called the three Dimensions. Now notice this. If you are using only one dimension, you could draw only a straight line. If you are using two, you could draw a figure: say, a square. And a square is made up of four straight lines. Now a step further. If you have three dimensions, you can then build what we call a solid body, say, a cube—a thing like a dice or a lump of sugar. And a cube is made up of six squares.

Do you see the point? A world of one dimension would be a straight line. In a two-dimensional world, you still get straight lines, but many lines make one figure. In a three-dimensional world, you still get figures but many figures make one solid body. In other words, as you advance to more real and more complicated levels, you do not leave behind you the things you found on the simpler levels: you still have them, but combined in new ways—in ways you could not imagine if you knew only the simpler levels.

Now the Christian account of God involves just the same principle. The human level is a simple and rather empty level. On the human level one person is one being, and any two persons are two separate beings—just as, in two dimensions (say on a flat sheet of paper) one square is one figure, and any two squares are two separate figures. On the Divine level you still find personalities; but up there you find them combined in new ways which we, who do not live on that level, cannot imagine.

In God’s dimension, so to speak, you find a being who is three Persons while remaining one Being, just as a cube is six squares while remaining one cube. Of course we cannot fully conceive a Being like that: just as, if we were so made that we perceived only two dimensions in space we could never properly imagine a cube. But we can get a sort of faint notion of it. And when we do, we are then, for the first time in our lives, getting some positive idea, however faint, of something super-personal—something more than a person. It is something we could never have guessed, and yet, once we have been told, one almost feels one ought to have been able to guess it because it fits in so well with all the things we know already.

You may ask, “If we cannot imagine a three-personal Being, what is the good of talking about Him?” Well, there isn’t any good talking about Him. The thing that matters is being actually drawn into that three-personal life, and that may begin any time —tonight, if you like.

. . . .

But beware of being drawn into the personal life of the Happy Family .

https://www.jstor.org/stable/24966339

“The colorful story of this undertaking begins with a bang.”

And ends with

Martin Gardner on Galois

Galois was a thoroughly obnoxious nerd,
suffering from what today would be called
a ‘personality disorder.’  His anger was
paranoid and unremitting.”

Monday, June 25, 2018

The Gateway Device

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:24 PM
 

<title data-rh="true">Frank Heart, Who Linked Computers Before the Internet, Dies at 89 – The New York Times</title>
. . . .
<meta data-rh="true" name="description" itemprop="description" content="Mr. Heart’s team built the gateway device for the Arpanet, the precursor to the internet. Data networking was so new then, they made it up as they went."/>
. . . .
<meta data-rh="true" property="article:published" itemprop="datePublished" content="2018-06-25T19:16:17.000Z"/>

See also yesterday's "For 6/24" and 

IMAGE- 'Nocciolo': A 'kernel' for Pascal's Hexagrammum Mysticum: The 15 2-subsets of a 6-set as points in a Galois geometry.

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Models of Being

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:30 AM

A Buddhist view —

"Just fancy a scale model of Being 
made out of string and cardboard."

— Nanavira Thera, 1 October 1957,
on a model of Kummer's Quartic Surface
mentioned by Eddington

A Christian view —

A formal view —

From a Log24 search for High Concept:

See also Galois Tesseract.

Monday, June 11, 2018

Arty Fact

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 10:35 PM

The title was suggested by the name "ARTI" of an artificial
intelligence in the new film 2036: Origin Unknown.

The Eye of ARTI —

See also a post of May 19, "Uh-Oh" —

— and a post of June 6, "Geometry for Goyim" — 

Mystery box  merchandise from the 2011  J. J. Abrams film  Super 8 

An arty fact I prefer, suggested by the triangular computer-eye forms above —

IMAGE- Hyperplanes (square and triangular) in PG(3,2), and coordinates for AG(4,2)

This is from the July 29, 2012, post The Galois Tesseract.

See as well . . .

Monday, June 4, 2018

The Trinity Stone Defined

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:56 PM

“Unsheathe your dagger definitions.” — James Joyce, Ulysses

The “triple cross” link in the previous post referenced the eightfold cube
as a structure that might be called the trinity stone .

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168

Some small Galois spaces (the Cullinane models)

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Not So Cryptic

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:56 PM

From the date of the New York Times  James Bond video
referenced in the previous post, "A Cryptic Message" —

Friday, May 4, 2018

Art & Design

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 4:00 PM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110219-SquareRootQuaternion.jpg

A star figure and the Galois quaternion.

The square root of the former is the latter.

See also a passage quoted here a year ago today
(May the Fourth, "Star Wars Day") —

Cube symmetry subgroup of order 8 from 'Geometry and Symmetry,' Paul B. Yale, 1968, p.21

The Tuchman Radical*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 3:33 PM

Two excerpts from today's Art & Design section of
The New York Times  —

For the deplorables of France —

For further remarks on l'ordre ,
see posts tagged Galois's Space
( tag=galoiss-space).

* The radical of the title is Évariste Galois (1811-1832).

Sunday, April 29, 2018

Amusement

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:00 PM

From the online New York Times  this afternoon:

Disney now holds nine of the top 10
domestic openings of all time —
six of which are part of the Marvel
Cinematic Universe. “The result is
a reflection of 10 years of work:
of developing this universe, creating
stakes as big as they were, characters
that matter and stories and worlds that
people have come to love,” Dave Hollis,
Disney’s president of distribution, said
in a phone interview.

From this  journal this morning:

"But she felt there must be more to this
than just the sensation of folding space
over on itself. Surely the Centaurs hadn't
spent ten years telling humanity how to 
make a fancy amusement-park ride
.
There had to be more—"

Factoring Humanity , by Robert J. Sawyer,
Tom Doherty Associates, 2004 Orb edition,
page 168

"The sensation of folding space . . . ."

Or unfolding:

Click the above unfolded space for some background.

Sunday, April 8, 2018

Design

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:00 PM

From a Log24 post of Feb. 5, 2009 —

Design Cube 2x2x2 for demonstrating Galois geometry

An online logo today —

See also Harry Potter and the Lightning Bolt.

 

Monday, March 12, 2018

“Quantum Tesseract Theorem?”

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Remarks related to a recent film and a not-so-recent film.

For some historical background, see Dirac and Geometry in this journal.

Also (as Thas mentions) after Saniga and Planat —

The Saniga-Planat paper was submitted on December 21, 2006.

Excerpts from this  journal on that date —

A Halmos tombstone and the tale of HAL and the pod bay doors

     "Open the pod bay doors, HAL."

Sunday, March 4, 2018

The Square Inch Space: A Brief History

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:21 AM

1955  ("Blackboard Jungle") —

1976 —

2009 —

2016 —

 Some small Galois spaces (the Cullinane models)

Saturday, February 17, 2018

The Binary Revolution

Michael Atiyah on the late Ron Shaw

Phrases by Atiyah related to the importance in mathematics
of the two-element Galois field GF(2) —

  • “The digital revolution based on the 2 symbols (0,1)”
  • “The algebra of George Boole”
  • “Binary codes”
  • “Dirac’s spinors, with their up/down dichotomy”

These phrases are from the year-end review of Trinity College,
Cambridge, Trinity Annual Record 2017 .

I prefer other, purely geometric, reasons for the importance of GF(2) —

  • The 2×2 square
  • The 2x2x2 cube
  • The 4×4 square
  • The 4x4x4 cube

See Finite Geometry of the Square and Cube.

See also today’s earlier post God’s Dice and Atiyah on the theology of
(Boolean) algebra vs. (Galois) geometry:

Friday, February 16, 2018

Two Kinds of Symmetry

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:29 PM

The Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) at Princeton in its Fall 2015 Letter 
revived "Beautiful Mathematics" as a title:

This ugly phrase was earlier used by Truman State University
professor Martin Erickson as a book title. See below. 

In the same IAS Fall 2015 Letter appear the following remarks
by Freeman Dyson —

". . . a special case of a much deeper connection that Ian Macdonald 
discovered between two kinds of symmetry which we call modular and affine.
The two kinds of symmetry were originally found in separate parts of science,
modular in pure mathematics and affine in physics. Modular symmetry is
displayed for everyone to see in the drawings of flying angels and devils
by the artist Maurits Escher. Escher understood the mathematics and got the
details right. Affine symmetry is displayed in the peculiar groupings of particles
created by physicists with high-energy accelerators. The mathematician
Robert Langlands was the first to conjecture a connection between these and
other kinds of symmetry. . . ." (Wikipedia link added.)

The adjective "modular"  might aptly be applied to . . .

The adjective "affine"  might aptly be applied to . . .

From 'Beautiful Mathematics,' by Martin Erickson, an excerpt on the Cullinane diamond theorem (with source not mentioned)

The geometry of the 4×4 square combines modular symmetry
(i.e., related to theta functions) with the affine symmetry above.

Hudson's 1905 discussion of modular symmetry (that of Rosenhain
tetrads and Göpel tetrads) in the 4×4 square used a parametrization
of that square by the digit 0 and the fifteen 2-subsets of a 6-set, but 
did not discuss the 4×4 square as an affine space.

For the connection of the 15 Kummer modular 2-subsets with the 16-
element affine space over the two-element Galois field GF(2), see my note
of May 26, 1986, "The 2-subsets of a 6-set are the points of a PG(3,2)" —

— and the affine structure in the 1979 AMS abstract
"Symmetry invariance in a diamond ring" —

For some historical background on the symmetry investigations by
Dyson and Macdonald, see Dyson's 1972 article "MIssed Opportunities."

For Macdonald's own  use of the words "modular" and "affine," see
Macdonald, I. G., "Affine Lie algebras and modular forms," 
Séminaire N. Bourbaki , Vol. 23 (1980-1981), Talk no. 577, pp. 258-276.

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Beware of Analogical Extension

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:29 AM

"By an archetype  I mean a systematic repertoire
of ideas by means of which a given thinker describes,
by analogical extension , some domain to which
those ideas do not immediately and literally apply."

— Max Black in Models and Metaphors 
    (Cornell, 1962, p. 241)

"Others … spoke of 'ultimate frames of reference' …."
Ibid.

A "frame of reference" for the concept  four quartets

A less reputable analogical extension  of the same
frame of reference

Madeleine L'Engle in A Swiftly Tilting Planet :

"… deep in concentration, bent over the model
they were building of a tesseract:
the square squared, and squared again…."

See also the phrase Galois tesseract .

Saturday, January 20, 2018

The Chaos Symbol of Dan Brown

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:30 AM

In the following passage, Dan Brown claims that an eight-ray star
with arrowheads at the rays' ends is "the mathematical symbol for
entropy."  Brown may have first encountered this symbol at a 
questionable "Sacred Science" website.  Wikipedia discusses
some even less  respectable uses of the symbol.

Related news —

Related symbolism —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110219-SquareRootQuaternion.jpg

A star figure and the Galois quaternion.

The square root of the former is the latter.

Friday, January 5, 2018

Types of Ambiguity

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:56 AM

From "The Principle of Sufficient Reason," by George David Birkhoff
in "Three Public Lectures on Scientific Subjects,"
delivered at the Rice Institute, March 6, 7, and 8, 1940 —

From the same lecture —

Up to the present point my aim has been to consider a variety of applications of the Principle of Sufficient Reason, without attempting any precise formulation of the Principle itself. With these applications in mind I will venture to formulate the Principle and a related Heuristic Conjecture in quasi-mathematical form as follows:

PRINCIPLE OF SUFFICIENT REASON. If there appears in any theory T a set of ambiguously  determined ( i e . symmetrically entering) variables, then these variables can themselves be determined only to the extent allowed by the corresponding group G. Consequently any problem concerning these variables which has a uniquely determined solution, must itself be formulated so as to be unchanged by the operations of the group G ( i e . must involve the variables symmetrically).

HEURISTIC CONJECTURE. The final form of any scientific theory T is: (1) based on a few simple postulates; and (2) contains an extensive ambiguity, associated symmetry, and underlying group G, in such wise that, if the language and laws of the theory of groups be taken for granted, the whole theory T appears as nearly self-evident in virtue of the above Principle.

The Principle of Sufficient Reason and the Heuristic Conjecture, as just formulated, have the advantage of not involving excessively subjective ideas, while at the same time retaining the essential kernel of the matter.

In my opinion it is essentially this principle and this conjecture which are destined always to operate as the basic criteria for the scientist in extending our knowledge and understanding of the world.

It is also my belief that, in so far as there is anything definite in the realm of Metaphysics, it will consist in further applications of the same general type. This general conclusion may be given the following suggestive symbolic form:

Image-- Birkhoff diagram relating Galois's theory of ambiguity to metaphysics

While the skillful metaphysical use of the Principle must always be regarded as of dubious logical status, nevertheless I believe it will remain the most important weapon of the philosopher.

Related remarks by a founding member of the Metaphysical Club:

See also the previous post, "Seven Types of Interality."

Wednesday, December 27, 2017

For Day 27 of December 2017

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 3:57 AM

See the 27-part structure of
the 3x3x3 Galois cube

IMAGE- The 3x3x3 Galois cube
as well as Autism Sunday 2015.

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Show Us Your Wall

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:10 PM

From Monday morning's post Advanced Study

"Mathematical research currently relies on
a complex system of mutual trust
based on reputations."

— The late Vladimir Voevodsky,
Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton,
The Institute Letter , Summer 2014, p. 8

Related news from today's online New York Times

A heading from the above screenshot: "SHOW US YOUR WALL."

This suggests a review of a concept from Galois geometry

On the wall— A Galois-geometry 'inscape'

(On the wall — a Galois-geometry inscape .)

Friday, September 29, 2017

Principles Before Personalities*

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

(Some Remarks for Science Addicts)

Principles —

IMAGE- The large Desargues configuration in light of Galois geometry

Personalities —

* See "Tradition Twelve."

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Core

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:01 PM

From the New York Times Wire  last night —

"Mr. Hefner styled himself as an emblem
of the sexual revolution."

From a Log24 post on September 23 —

A different emblem related to other remarks in the above Sept. 23 post

On the wall— A Galois-geometry 'inscape'

(On the wall — a Galois-geometry inscape .)

Saturday, September 23, 2017

The Turn of the Year

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:59 PM

Quioted here  last  year on September 23rd

See also Galois Quaternion.

The Turn of the Frame

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:19 AM

"With respect to the story's content, the frame thus acts
both as an inclusion of the exterior and as an exclusion
of the interior: it is a perturbation of the outside at the
very core of the story's inside, and as such, it is a blurring
of the very difference between inside and outside."

— Shoshana Felman on a Henry James story, p. 123 in
"Turning the Screw of Interpretation,"
Yale French Studies  No. 55/56 (1977), pp. 94-207.
Published by Yale University Press.

See also the previous post and The Galois Tesseract.

Friday, September 15, 2017

Space Art

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:05 PM

Silas in "Equals" (2015) —

Ever since we were kids it's been drilled into us that 
Our purpose is to explore the universe, you know.
Outer space is where we'll find 
…  the answers to why we're here and 
…  and where we come from.

Related material — 

'The Art of Space Art' in The Paris Review, Sept. 14, 2017

See also Galois Space  in this  journal.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Annals of Critical Epistemology

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 5:36 PM

"But unlike many who left the Communist Party, I turned left
rather than right, and returned—or rather turned for the first time—
to a critical examination of Marx's work. I found—and still find—
that his analysis of capitalism, which for me is the heart of his work,
provides the best starting point, the best critical tools, with which—
suitably developed—to understand contemporary capitalism.
I remind you that this year is also the sesquicentennial of the
Communist Manifesto , a document that still haunts the capitalist world."

— From "Autobiographical Reflections," a talk given on June 5, 1998, by
John Stachel at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin
on the occasion of a workshop honoring his 70th birthday, 
"Space-Time, Quantum Entanglement and Critical Epistemology."

From a passage by Stachel quoted in the previous post

From the source for Stachel's remarks on Weyl and coordinatization —

Note that Stachel distorted Weyl's text by replacing Weyl's word 
"symbols" with the word "quantities." —

This replacement makes no sense if the coordinates in question
are drawn from a Galois field — a field not of quantities , but rather
of algebraic symbols .

"You've got to pick up every stitch… Must be the season of the witch."
— Donovan song at the end of Nicole Kidman's "To Die For"

Florence 2001

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:44 AM

Or:  Coordinatization for Physicists

This post was suggested by the link on the word "coordinatized"
in the previous post.

I regret that Weyl's term "coordinatization" perhaps has
too many syllables for the readers of recreational mathematics —
for example, of an article on 4×4 magic squares by Conway, Norton,
and Ryba to be published today by Princeton University Press.

Insight into the deeper properties of such squares unfortunately
requires both the ability to learn what a "Galois field" is and the
ability to comprehend seven-syllable words.

Thursday, August 31, 2017

A Conway-Norton-Ryba Theorem

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:40 PM

In a book to be published Sept. 5 by Princeton University Press,
John Conway, Simon Norton,  and Alex Ryba present the following
result on order-four magic squares —

A monograph published in 1976, “Diamond Theory,” deals with
more general 4×4 squares containing entries from the Galois fields
GF(2), GF(4), or GF(16).  These squares have remarkable, if not
“magic,” symmetry properties.  See excerpts in a 1977 article.

See also Magic Square and Diamond Theorem in this  journal.

Sunday, August 27, 2017

Black Well

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The “Black” of the title refers to the previous post.
For the “Well,” see Hexagram 48.

Related material —

The Galois Tesseract and, more generally, Binary Coordinate Systems.

Saturday, August 26, 2017

Aesthetic Distance

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:59 PM

Naive readers may suppose that this sort of thing is 
related to what has been dubbed "geometric group theory."

It is not. See posts now tagged Aesthetic Distance.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Symmetry’s Lifeboat

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 9:16 PM

A post suggested by the word tzimtzum  (see Wednesday)
or tsimtsum  (see this morning) —

Lifeboat from the Tsimtsum  in Life of Pi  —

Another sort of tsimtsum, contracting infinite space to a finite space —

IMAGE- Desargues's theorem in light of Galois geometry

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

A Date at the Death Cafe

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:48 PM

The New York TImes  reports this evening that
"Jon Underwood, Founder of Death Cafe Movement,"
died suddenly at 44 on June 27. 

This  journal on that date linked to a post titled "The Mystic Hexastigm."

A related remark on the complete 6-point   from Sunday, April 28, 2013

(See, in Veblen and Young's 1910 Vol. I, exercise 11,
page 53: "A plane section of a 6-point in space can  
be considered as 3 triangles perspective in pairs
from 3 collinear points with corresponding sides
meeting in 3 collinear points." This is the large  
Desargues configuration. See Classical Geometry
in Light of Galois Geometry
.)

This  post was suggested, in part, by the philosophical ruminations
of Rosalind Krauss in her 2011 book Under Blue Cup . See 
Sunday's post  Perspective and Its Transections . (Any resemblance
to Freud's title Civilization and Its Discontents  is purely coincidental.)

Sunday, July 9, 2017

Perspective and Its Transections

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 5:27 PM

The title phrase is from Rosalind Krauss (Under Blue Cup , 2011) —

Another way of looking at the title phrase —

"A very important configuration is obtained by
taking the plane section of a complete space five-point." 
(Veblen and Young, 1910, p. 39) —

'Desargues via Galois' in Japan (via Pinterest) 

For some context, see Desargues + Galois in this journal.

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Imaginarium of a Different Kind

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

The title refers to that of the previous post, "The Imaginarium."

In memory of a translator who reportedly died on May  22, 2017,
a passage quoted here on that date —

Related material — A paragraph added on March 15, 2017,
to the Wikipedia article on Galois geometry

George Conwell gave an early demonstration of Galois geometry in 1910 when he characterized a solution of Kirkman's schoolgirl problem as a partition of sets of skew lines in PG(3,2), the three-dimensional projective geometry over the Galois field GF(2).[3] Similar to methods of line geometry in space over a field of characteristic 0, Conwell used Plücker coordinates in PG(5,2) and identified the points representing lines in PG(3,2) as those on the Klein quadric.

— User Rgdboer

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Expanding the Spielraum (Continued*)

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:13 PM

Or:  The Square

"What we do may be small, but it has
 a certain character of permanence."
— G. H. Hardy

* See Expanding the Spielraum in this journal.

Monday, May 29, 2017

The American Sublime

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:12 PM

Line from "Vide," a post of June 8, 2014 —

Vide  Classical Geometry in Light of Galois Geometry.

Recall that vide  means different things in Latin and in French.

See also Stevens + "Vacant Space" in this journal.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Pursued by a Biplane

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:41 PM

The Galois Tesseract as a biplane —

Cary Grant in 'North by Northwest'

Saturday, May 20, 2017

The Ludicrous Extreme

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:04 AM

From a review of the 2016 film "Arrival"

"A seemingly off-hand reference to Abbott and Costello
is our gateway. In a movie as generally humorless as Arrival,
the jokes mean something. Ironically, it is Donnelly, not Banks,
who initiates the joke, naming the verbally inexpressive
Heptapod aliens after the loquacious Classical Hollywood
comedians. The squid-like aliens communicate via those beautiful,
cryptic images. Those signs, when thoroughly comprehended,
open the perceiver to a nonlinear conception of time; this is
Sapir-Whorf taken to the ludicrous extreme."

Jordan Brower in the Los Angeles Review of Books

Further on in the review —

"Banks doesn’t fully understand the alien language, but she
knows it well enough to get by. This realization emerges
most evidently when Banks enters the alien ship and, floating
alongside Costello, converses with it in their picture-language.
She asks where Abbott is, and it responds — as presented
in subtitling — that Abbott 'is death process.'
'Death process' — dying — is not idiomatic English, and what
we see, written for us, is not a perfect translation but a
rendering of Banks’s understanding. This, it seems to me, is a
crucial moment marking the hard limit of a human mind,
working within the confines of human language to understand
an ultimately intractable xenolinguistic system."

For what may seem like an intractable xenolinguistic system to
those whose experience of mathematics is limited to portrayals
by Hollywood, see the previous post —

van Lint and Wilson Meet the Galois Tesseract.

The death process of van Lint occurred on Sept. 28, 2004.

See this journal on that date

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Image Albums

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:05 PM

Pinterest boards uploaded to the new m759.net/piwigo

Diamond Theorem 

Diamond Theorem Correlation

Miracle Octad Generator

The Eightfold Cube

Six-Set Geometry

Diamond Theory Cover

Update of May 2 —

Four-Color Decomposition

Binary Galois Spaces

The Galois Tesseract

Update of May 3 —

Desargues via Galois

The Tetrahedral Model

Solomon's Cube

Update of May 8 —

Art Space board created at Pinterest

Saturday, April 29, 2017

For the Church of Synchronology*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 PM

A book cover from Amazon.com —

See also this journal on the above date, September 27, 2016 —

Chomsky and Levi-Strauss in China,
Or: Philosophy for Jews
.

Some other remarks related to the figure on the book cover —

Field Theology and Galois Window.

* See Synchronology in this journal.

Friday, April 28, 2017

A Generation Lost in Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:00 PM

The title is from Don McLean's classic "American Pie."

A Finite Projective Space —

A Non-Finite Projective Space —

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Partner, Anchor, Decompose

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:31 PM

See also a figure from 2 AM ET April 26 

" Partner, anchor, decompose. That's not math.
That's the plot to 'Silence of the Lambs.' "

Greg Gutfeld, September 2014

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