Log24

Saturday, January 29, 2005

Saturday January 29, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:06 PM

Da Capo, Part II:

The Elegant Window

From a review of
The Nick Tosches Reader,
published by Da Capo Press:

“Elegant as a slow blues.”

Rolling Stone
 
“Examples are the
stained-glass windows of knowledge.”

— Vladimir Nabokov

And so….

RealOne Player

Windows Media
.

See also

Architecture of Eternity.

Thursday, January 27, 2005

Thursday January 27, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 PM

Da Capo
                                                
                           You say I am repeating
    Something I have said before. I shall say it again.
Shall I say it again?                                           

Four Quartets

From Golden Globe night:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050116-Rag.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 

Symbols

A Game of Chess

Geometry for Jews

Geometry of Quartets

Thursday January 27, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 3:33 PM
Glasshouse Productions

presents:

The Man in the Glass Booth

and the sequel,

The Man in the Glass Box.

"I don’t know how you expiate guilt."

Philip Johnson, Vanity Fair, May 1993

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050127-Shaw.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Ask Robert Shaw.

Thursday January 27, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM
From today's San Diego Union-Tribune:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050127-Aus.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Is it safe?

Thursday January 27, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 2:29 AM
Crystal Night

From artbook.com:

Mies van der Rohe:
Mies in Berlin

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050127-Mies.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Winner of
The Society of Architectural Historians
2002 Philip Johnson Award
for Excellence

Exhibition Catalog

"Published to accompany
a groundbreaking 2001 exhibition at
The Museum of Modern Art, New York."

 

From Mies and the Mastodon,
by Martin Filler, The New Republic,
issue dated Aug. 6, 2001:

"It would have been wiser for the new MoMA catalog… to have addressed the issue of his politics…. By ignoring such a central subject… the show gives off a mild stench of cover-up…. Only the German-born Rosemarie Haag Bletter (full disclosure: she is my wife) alludes to the verboten topic in her [catalog] essay on Mies's flirtation with crystal imagery, drawing a sharp parallel between the architect's extensive use of Kristallglas (plate glass) and the ensuing devastation of Kristallnacht, which erupted just three months after he left for the States."

Also from Filler's essay:

"Mies's rigorously simplified structures, typified by grids of steel and glass and an absence of applied ornament, represented the Platonic ideal of modernism for many people."

For more on history, politics, and
Mies's disciple Philip Johnson,
who died Tuesday evening, see

"We Cannot Not Know History."

For more on aesthetics, see the
Log24.net entry of Tuesday noon,

Diamonds Are Forever.

For more on a Platonic ideal of sorts,
see the following figure in two versions:
 
Version A, from Plato's Meno and
Diamond Theory,

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050127-MenoDiamond.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

and Version B,

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050125-Forever.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

from the date of Johnson's death
at his "famous crystalline box."

Was less more?

Wednesday, January 26, 2005

Wednesday January 26, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:26 PM
The Schroeder-Bernstein Theorem
  arranged in musical form
by Norman Megill

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050126-Schroeder.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

For the mad musicians
of Princeton

To hear the music,
click on the notes:
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050126-Notes.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Tuesday, January 25, 2005

Tuesday January 25, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Diamonds Are Forever

 
The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/Modal-diamondinbox.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Robert Stone,
A Flag for Sunrise:

" 'That old Jew gave me this here.'  Egan looked at the diamond.  'I ain't giving this to you, understand?  The old man gave it to me for my boy.  It's worth a whole lot of money– you can tell that just by looking– but it means something, I think.  It's got a meaning, like.'

'Let's see,' Egan said, 'what would it mean?'  He took hold of Pablo's hand cupping the stone and held his own hand under it.  '"The jewel is in the lotus," perhaps that's what it means.  The eternal in the temporal.  The Boddhisattva declining nirvana out of compassion.   Contemplating the ignorance of you and me, eh?  That's a metaphor of our Buddhist friends.'

Pablo's eyes glazed over.  'Holy shit,' he said.  'Santa Maria.'  He stared at the diamond in his palm with passion.

'Hey,' he said to the priest, 'diamonds are forever!  You heard of that, right?  That means something, don't it?'

'I have heard it,' Egan said.  'Perhaps it has a religious meaning.' "
 


"We symbolize logical necessity
with the box (box.gif (75 bytes))
and logical possibility
with the diamond (diamond.gif (82 bytes))."

Keith Allen Korcz


From

DIALECTIC AND EXISTENCE
IN KIERKEGAARD AND KANT

Nythamar Fernandes de Oliveira

Pontifical Catholic University
at Porto Alegre, Brazil

"Such is the paradoxical 'encounter' of the eternal with the temporal. Just like the Moment of the Incarnation, when the Eternal entered the temporal, Kierkegaard refers to the category of the Instant (Danish Ojeblikket, 'a glance of the eye, eyeblink,' German Augenblick) as the dialectical kernel of our existential consciousness:

If the instant is posited, so is the eternal –but also the future, which comes again like the past … The concept around which everything turns in Christianity, the concept which makes all things new, is the fullness of time, is the instant as eternity, and yet this eternity is at once the future and the past.

Although I cannot examine here the Kierkegaardian conception of time, the dialectical articulation of time and existence, as can be seen, underlies his entire philosophy of existence, just as the opposition between 'eternity' and 'temporality': the instant, as 'an atom of eternity,' serves to restructure the whole synthesis of selfhood into a spiritual one, in man’s 'ascent' toward its Other and the Unknown. In the last analysis, the Eternal transcends every synthesis between eternity and time, infinity and finiteness, preserving not only the Absolute Paradox in itself but above all the wholly otherness of God. It is only because of the Eternal, therefore, that humans can still hope to attain their ultimate vocation of becoming a Chistian. As Kierkegaard writes in Works of Love (1847),

The possibility of the good is more than possibility, for it is the eternal. This is the basis of the fact that one who hopes can never be deceived, for to hope is to expect the possibility of the good; but the possibility of the good is eternal. …But if there is less love in him, there is also less of the eternal in him; but if there is less of the eternal in him, there is also less possibility, less awareness of possibility (for possibility appears through the temporal movement of the eternal within the eternal in a human being)."

Monday, January 24, 2005

Monday January 24, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:23 PM

The Diamond
of Possibility


by  Keith Allen Korcz

“We symbolize logical necessity with the box (box.gif (75 bytes)) and logical possibility with the diamond (diamond.gif (82 bytes)).  I first discuss combining negations with the box and diamond, noting that logical possibility and logical necessity are inter-definable with the help of negation: box.gif (75 bytes)p = ~diamond.gif (82 bytes)~p and diamond.gif (82 bytes)p = ~box.gif (75 bytes)~p. Thus, possibility and necessity are two sides of the same coin.”

And what do we           
 symbolize by  The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/Modal-diamondbox.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. ?

Monday January 24, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:45 PM

Old School Tie

From a review of A Beautiful Mind:

“We are introduced to John Nash, fuddling flat-footed about the Princeton courtyard, uninterested in his classmates’ yammering about their various accolades. One chap has a rather unfortunate sense of style, but rather than tritely insult him, Nash holds a patterned glass to the sun, [director Ron] Howard shows us refracted patterns of light that take shape in a punch bowl, which Nash then displaces onto the neckwear, replying, ‘There must be a formula for how ugly your tie is.’ “

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050124-Tie.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“Three readings of diamond and box
have been extremely influential.”

Draft of
Computing with Modal Logics
(pdf), by Carlos Areces
and Maarten de Rijke

“Algebra in general is particularly suited for structuring and abstracting. Here, structure is imposed via symmetries and dualities, for instance in terms of Galois connections….

… diamonds and boxes are upper and lower adjoints of Galois connections….”

— “Modal Kleene Algebra
and Applications: A Survey
(pdf), by Jules Desharnais,
Bernhard Möller, and
Georg Struth, March 2004

See also
Galois Correspondence

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050124-galois12s.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Evariste Galois

and Log24.net, May 20, 2004:

“Perhaps every science must
start with metaphor
and end with algebra;
and perhaps without metaphor
there would never have been
any algebra.”

— attributed, in varying forms
(1, 2, 3), to Max Black,
Models and Metaphors, 1962

For metaphor and
algebra combined, see

“Symmetry invariance
in a diamond ring,”

A.M.S. abstract 79T-A37,
Notices of the Amer. Math. Soc.,
February 1979, pages A-193, 194 —
the original version of the 4×4 case
of the diamond theorem.

Sunday, January 23, 2005

Sunday January 23, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 6:06 PM

Death and the Spirit,
Part IV

From Tuesday:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050123-Tiger.JPG” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Seriously.

See also

Death and the Spirit, Part I,

Death and the Spirit, Part II, and

Death and the Spirit, Part III.

Saturday, January 22, 2005

Saturday January 22, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Go Tigers!

Recommended reading for the
Princeton Evangelical Fellowship (PEF):

Walter Kirn, Lost in the Meritocracy,
Atlantic Monthly Jan.-Feb. 2005

The PEF in action:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050122-PEF.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"Only by the form, the pattern,
Can words or music reach
The stillness."

— T. S. Eliot 

Thursday, January 20, 2005

Thursday January 20, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:00 AM

I mean, seriously…

The Comedians is about three men, Smith, Jones and Brown….

“Again I was aware of the three names, interchangeable like comic masks in a farce.”

— Graham Greene, The Comedians, Penguin paperback, 1991, p. 23

Pico Iyer on Graham Greene in the current New York Review of Books:

“To play out the full logic….”

Brown, Jones, and Smith are suspected of a crime. They testify as follows:

Brown: Jones is guilty and Smith is innocent.

Jones: If Brown is guilty then so is Smith.

Smith: I’m innocent, but at least one of the others is guilty.

Assuming all testimony is true, who is innocent and who is guilty?

Assuming that the innocent told the truth and the guilty told lies, who is innocent and who is guilty?

— Mathematical logic
    homework problem (pdf)

Wednesday, January 19, 2005

Wednesday January 19, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:00 PM

But seriously…

A follow-up to the previous “tiger” entry (which was about an old but good dirty joke).

I just subscribed to The New York Review of Books online for another year, prompted by my desire to read Roger Shattuck on Rimbaud, a tiger of another sort:

“How did this poetic sensibility come to burn so bright?”

The Shattuck piece is from 1967, the year of The Doors’ first album.  (See Sunday’s Death and the Spirit, Part II.)

Tuesday, January 18, 2005

Tuesday January 18, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:44 PM
Death and
the Spirit, Part III

In memory of comedian
Gene Baylos, who died
on Jan. 10, 2005:

From the dark jungle
as a tiger bright,
Form from the viewless Spirit
leaps to light.

— Rumi, “Reality and Appearance”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050118-Tiger2.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

Tuesday January 18, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Globe Song

Are you a lucky little lady
in The City of Light
Or just another lost angel…

City of Night

— Jim Morrison, L.A. Woman

(See Sunday's noon entry.)

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050118-LadyAndAngel.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Of course, it's the lost angels
that really get to us: 

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050118-ChanelKidman2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Sunday, January 16, 2005

Sunday January 16, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:00 PM

Four Quartets

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050116-Rag.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Symbols

A Game of Chess

Geometry for Jews

Geometry of Quartets

Sunday January 16, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Death and the
Spirit, Part II

Readings

Are you a lucky little lady
in The City of Light
Or just another lost angel…
City of Night

— Jim Morrison, L.A. Woman

Fourmillante cité,
cité pleine de rêves,
Où le spectre en plein jour
raccroche le passant

— Baudelaire,
Les Fleurs du Mal,
and T. S. Eliot,
Notes to The Waste Land

"When you got the mojo, brother —
when you're on the inside —
the world is fantastic."

— Pablo Tabor in Robert Stone's
A Flag for Sunrise
,
Knopf, 1981, p. 428

Now it was Avril's turn to understand and he was frightened out of his wits.

"The Science of Luck," he said cautiously. "You watch, do you?  That takes a lot of self-discipline."

"Of course it does, but it's worth it.  I watch everything, all the time.  I'm one of the lucky ones.  I've got the gift.  I knew it when I was a kid, but I didn't grasp it."  The murmur had intensified.  "This last time, when I was alone so long, I got it right.  I watch for every opportunity and I never do the soft thing.  That's why I succeed."

Avril was silent for a long time.  "It is the fashion," he said at last.  "You've been reading the Frenchmen, I suppose?  Or no, no, perhaps you haven't.  How absurd of me."

"Don't blether."  The voice, stripped of all its disguises, was harsh and naive.  "You always blethered.  You never said anything straight.  What do you know about the Science of Luck?  Go on, tell me.  You're the only one who's understood at all.  Have you ever heard of it before?"

"Not under that name."

"I don't suppose you have.  That's my name for it.  What's its real name?"

"The Pursuit of Death."

— Margery Allingham,
Chapter Seventeen,
"On the Staircase," from
The Tiger in the Smoke

Anagrams

In memory of Danny Sugerman,
late manager of The Doors:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050116-Sugerman.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Danny Sugerman
Photo by
Frank Alan Bella, 2002

"Mr Mojo Risin" = "Jim Morrison."
"Audible Era" = "Baudelaire."
"Bad Rumi" = "Rimbaud."

From the dark jungle
as a tiger bright,
Form from the viewless Spirit
leaps to light.

— Rumi,  "Reality and Appearance,"
translated by R. A. Nicholson

(See also Death and the Spirit
from Twelfth Night, 2005, the date
of Danny Sugerman's death.)
 

Friday, January 14, 2005

Friday January 14, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:56 PM

Geometry Download

There is a new web page offering my notes on finite geometry in a very large (about 7 MB) zipped folder for downloading.  (Individual notes may be previewed without downloading the folder.)

Thursday, January 13, 2005

Thursday January 13, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

State of Grace

Utmost is relative —
Have not or Have
Adjacent sums
Enough — the first Abode
On the familiar Road
Galloped in Dreams —

Emily Dickinson

“Only through time time is conquered.”
— T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets

Thursday January 13, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:57 AM

Hope of Heaven

“Heaven is a state,
a sort of metaphysical state.”
— John O’Hara, Hope of Heaven, 1938

“The old men know
when an old man dies.”
— Ogden Nash

See also the five Log24 entries
ending with the 9 PM entry of
Tuesday, December 10, 2002.

From today’s New York Times:

“Joseph S. Frelinghuysen, whose memoir, Passages to Freedom, chronicled his escape from a prison camp in Italy during World War II, died on Saturday in Morristown, N.J. He was 92.”

A web page on the Indiantown Gap army camp quotes Frelinghuysen’s Passages to Freedom… He is describing July 1942, just before Frelinghuysen’s unit was sent overseas:

“In the last week of July, his wife Emily came to Indiantown to stay at the old Hershey Hotel so they could steal a few of the remaining hours together. He explained, ‘On my last night with Emily, she wore an evening dress with a full green and rose colored skirt, and I put on my best garrison uniform …. we had California champagne, lobster, and flaming crepes with ice cream. We danced to some old tunes; Cole Porter’s ‘Night and Day’ and Irving Berlin’s tunes from ‘Top Hat.’ Then they played a new one slowly, and a young girl sang the lyrics to ‘The White Cliffs of Dover.’ Noting that England had been at war for three years, he reminisced that it was a song that speaks of ‘love and laughter’ and ‘peace ever after.’ Nostalgically, he said, ‘We finished the dance in an embrace. She took my hand and we walked out through the lobby onto the terrace for a last look at the gardens in the pale light of a quarter moon.’ “

“Darkness and light,
the old man thought.
It is what every hero legend is about.
The darkness which is more than death,
the light which is love….”

Prince Ombra, quoted here on
the date of Frelinghuysen’s death,
Saturday, January 8, 2005.

Monday, January 10, 2005

Monday January 10, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Realism

In memory of Humphrey Carpenter:

“Aslan’s last words come at the end of The Last Battle: ‘There was a real railway accident […] Your father and mother and all of you are–as you used to call it in the Shadow-Lands–dead. The term is over: the holidays have begun. The dream is ended: this is the morning.’ The final paragraph of the novel, which follows these words, functions as a coda; it is full of the conventions which signal the wrapping up of a story. This direct speech is the true climax of the Chronicles. Aslan is given the last word in these quiet but emphatic lines. He is the ultimate arbiter of reality: ‘There was a real railway accident.’ Plato, in addition to the Christian tradition, lies behind the closing chapters of The Last Battle….

‘It’s all in Plato, all in Plato: bless me, what do they teach them at these schools!’ “

Joy Alexander, Aslan’s Speech

See also From Tate to Plato (Nov. 19, 2004), Habeas Corpus (Nov. 24, 2004), and the Log24 entries of last Friday through Sunday.

There was a real railway accident.

Sunday, January 9, 2005

Sunday January 9, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:00 PM

Another Death

“I should be glad of another death,” wrote T. S. Eliot in “Journey of the Magi.”

But not Humphrey Carpenter‘s.  Carpenter, like Eliot and Guy Davenport (see last two days’ entries) died on a January 4th.  He will be missed.

Sunday January 9, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:10 PM

Light at Bologna

“Others say it is a stone that posseses mysterious powers…. often depicted as a dazzling light.  It’s a symbol representing power, a source of immense energy.  It nourishes, heals, wounds, blinds, strikes down…. Some have thought of it as the philosopher’s stone of the alchemists….”

Foucault’s Pendulum
by Umberto Eco,
Professor of Semiotics at
 Europe’s oldest university,
 the University of Bologna.

The Club Dumas

by Arturo Perez-Reverte

(Paperback, pages 346-347):

One by one, he tore the engravings from the book, until he had all nine.  He looked at them closely.  “It’s a pity you can’t follow me where I’m going.  As the fourth engraving states, fate is not the same for all.”

“Where do you believe you’re going?”

Borja dropped the mutilated book on the floor with the others. He was looking at the nine engravings and at the circle, checking strange correspondences between them.

“To meet someone” was his enigmatic answer. “To search for the stone that the Great Architect rejected, the philosopher’s stone, the basis of the philosophical work. The stone of power. The devil likes metamorphoses, Corso. From Faust’s black dog to the false angel of light who tried to break down Saint Anthony’s resistance.  But most of all, stupidity bores him, and he hates monotony….”

Eclogues: Eight Stories

by Guy Davenport

Johns Hopkins paperback, 1993, page 127 —

Lo Splendore della Luce a Bologna, VI:

“In 1603, at Monte Paderno, outside Bologna, an alchemist (by day a cobbler) named Vicenzo Cascariolo discovered the Philosopher’s Stone, catalyst in the transformation of base metals into gold, focus of the imagination, talisman for abstruse thought.  Silver in some lights, white in others, it glowed blue in darkness, awesome to behold.”


The Discovery of Luminescence:

The Bolognian Stone

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050109-Bologna.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Bologna, 16th Century

“For the University of Bologna hosting an International Conference on Bioluminescence and Chemiluminescence has a very special significance. Indeed, it is in our fair City that modern scientific research on these phenomena has its earliest roots….

‘After submitting the stone
to much preparation, it was not
the Pluto of Aristophanes
that resulted; instead, it was
the Luciferous Stone’ ”

From one of the best books
of the 20th century:

The Hawkline Monster

by Richard Brautigan

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050109-Hawkline.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
“The Chemicals that resided in the jar were a combination of hundreds of things from all over the world.  Some of The Chemicals were ancient and very difficult to obtain.  There were a few drops of something from an Egyptian pyramid dating from the year 3000 B.C.

There were distillates from the jungles of South America and drops of things from plants that grew near the snowline in the Himalayas.

Ancient China, Rome and Greece had contributed things, too, that had found their way into the jar.  Witchcraft and modern science, the latest of discoveries, had also contributed to the contents of the jar.  There was even something that was reputed to have come all the way from Atlantis….

… they did not know that the monster was an illusion created by a mutated light in The Chemicals. a light that had the power to work its will upon mind and matter and change the very nature of reality to fit its mischievous mind.”

Saturday, January 8, 2005

Saturday January 8, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:26 PM
Splendor of the Light

The Beginning of a Story
by Guy Davenport

Lo Splendore della Luce a Bologna

“The locomotive bringing a trainload of philosophers to Bologna hissed and ground to a standstill in the long Appenine dusk to have its headlamps lit and to be dressed in the standards of the city and the university.”

Eclogues, by Guy Davenport
(Johns Hopkins paperbacks
   ed. edition, 1993, page 125)

Related material:

The train wreck at 12:50 pm local time (6:50 AM EST) Friday, Jan. 7, 2005, 25 miles north of Bologna.

A northbound freight train collided with a passenger train traveling south from Verona to Bologna.

From an essay on Davenport I found Friday morning, well before I learned on Friday afternoon (Eastern Standard Time) of the train wreck:

“A disciple of Ezra Pound, he adapts to the short story the ideogrammatic method of The Cantos, where a grammar of images, emblems, and symbols replaces that of logical sequence. This grammar allows for the grafting of particulars into a congeries of implied relation without subordination. In contrast to postmodernists, Davenport does not omit causal connection and linear narrative continuity for the sake of an aleatory play of signification but in order to intimate by combinational logic kinships and correspondences among eras, ideas and forces.”

— “When Novelists Become Cubists:
    The Prose Ideograms of Guy Davenport,”
by Andre Furlani

See also
Friday’s Log24 entries and
Davenport’s Express.

Saturday January 8, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:00 AM

24

The Star
of Venus

“He looked at the fading light
in the western sky and saw Mercury,
or perhaps it was Venus,
gleaming at him as the evening star.
Darkness and light,
the old man thought.
It is what every hero legend is about.
The darkness which is more than death,
the light which is love, like our friend
Venus here, or perhaps this star is
Mercury, the messenger of Olympus,
the bringer of hope.”

Roderick MacLeish, Prince Ombra

Related material:

The Devil and Wallace Stevens,

Journey of the Magi
,

and

Hexagram 24:

“The time of darkness is past.
The winter solstice brings
the victory of light.”

Saturday January 8, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:48 AM

Remembrance

Great is your love,  Prince Ombra answered finally, and eternal is its mystery to me.  Yet honor was not denied me in the fire of Creation.  Ombra, lord vanquisher of heroes, pledges this, O brother of David, Arthur the King, and Susano– the child will speak even as you fall before me.  You will be remembered.

—  Prince Ombra, by Roderick MacLeish

“There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance.”

William Shakespeare, Hamlet

Friday, January 7, 2005

Friday January 7, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:35 AM

A corpse will be
transported by express!

(Ideograms for Guy Davenport;
see also previous entry.)

“At the still point,
there the dance is.”
— T. S. Eliot

Illustration from
Tuesday, April 22, 2003:

Temptation


Locomotive

The Star
of Venus


Locomotion

Related material:
The Devil and Wallace Stevens

Friday January 7, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:59 AM

In Memory of
Guy Davenport

From the day Davenport died:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050104-Endgame.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“At Merton College, Oxford,
he wrote the first thesis on Joyce
to be accepted by the university.”

Today’s New York Times

From a very informative essay
on Davenport’s aesthetics:

“T.S. Eliot’s experiments
in ideogrammatic method
are equally germane to Davenport,
who shares with the poet
an avant-garde aesthetic and
a conservative temperament.
Davenport’s text reverberates
with echoes of Four Quartets.”

— Andre Furlani

“At the still point, there the dance is.”

—  T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets,
quoted in the epigraph to
the chapter on automorphism groups
in Parallelisms of Complete Designs,
by Peter J. Cameron,
published when Cameron was at
Merton College, Oxford.

See also
Elegance.

Thursday, January 6, 2005

Thursday January 6, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:00 PM

Epiphany Gift:

A new download page
for the Diamond 16 Puzzle.

Wednesday, January 5, 2005

Wednesday January 5, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:11 AM

Death and the Spirit

A meditation for Twelfth Night
on “the whirligig of time

Today’s New York Times obituaries feature two notable graphic artists: 

  • Frank Kelly Freas, who created, among other works, 400 portraits of saints for the Franciscans and the covers of Mad Magazine from 1958 through 1962. “I found it difficult to shift my artistic gears from the sublime to the ridiculous and back again,” he said of his departure from Mad.
  • Will Eisner, “an innovative comic-book artist who created the Spirit, a hero without superpowers, and the first modern graphic novel.”

Yesterday’s entry provided an approach to The Dark Lady, Kali, that was, in Freas’s apt word, “ridiculous.”  The illustration below, “Mate,” is an attempt to balance yesterday’s entry with an approach that is, if not sublime, at least more serious.  It is based on a similar illustration from Jan. 31, 2003, with actress Judy Davis playing The Dark Lady.  Today it seems appropriate to replace Davis with another actress (anonymous here, though some may recognize her).  I once knew her (unlike Davis) personally.  One of my fondest memories of high school is reading Mad Magazine with her in the school lunch room.  Our lives diverged after high school, but I could happily have spent my life in her company.

Mate

– S. H. Cullinane, Twelfth Night, 2005

The image “http://log24.com/log/pix05/050105-Mate.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

A diamond and its dual “whirl” figure—
or a “jewel-box and its mate”

For details, see the five Log24 entries
ending on Feb. 1, 2003, and the
perceptive remarks of Ryan Benedetti
on Sam Spade and Brigid O’Shaughnessy.

As for Eisner and “The Spirit,”
which has been called
the quintessential noir detective series,”
those preferring non-graphic stories
may picture Spade or his creator,
Dashiell Hammett, in the title role.

Then, of course, there are Eisner’s later
  story, “A Contract With God,”
  John 4:24, and 1916 4/24.

Tuesday, January 4, 2005

Tuesday January 4, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:00 AM
The Romantic School

Today’s New York Times:

“Mr. Denker was of the romantic school
of chess – always looking to attack.”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050104-Chess.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

From Endgame:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050104-Endgame.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Black the knight upon that ocean,
Bright the sun upon the king.
Dark the queen that stands beside him,
White his castle, threatening.

In the shadows’ see a bishop
Guards his queen of love and hate.
Another move, the game will be up;
Take the queen, her knight will mate.

The knight said “Move, be done.  It’s over.”
“Love and resign,” the bishop cried.
“When it’s done you’ll stand forever
By the darkest beauty’s side.”

From Log24.net, Feb. 18, 2003:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050104-Kali.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Kali, a goddess sometimes depicted
as a dancing girl; Kali is related to kAla,
time, according to one website,  as
“the force which governs and stops time.”
See also the novel The Fermata,
by Nicholson Baker.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050104-Ferm.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

From an entry of Sunday, Jan. 2,
the day Denker died:

“Time had been canceled.”    
— Stephen King, The Shining

From Truth and Style, a tribute
to the late Amy Spindler, style editor
of the New York Times Magazine:

“I don’t believe in truth. I believe in style.”
— Hugh Grant in Vogue magazine, July 1995

From a related page,
The Crimson Passion:

“He takes us to the central activity
of mathematics—which is imagining….”

Harvard Magazine on
Harvard mathematician
and author Barry Mazur.

For related material on Mazur, see

A Mathematical Lie.

“The teenagers aren’t all bad.
I love ’em if nobody else does.
There ain’t nothing wrong
with young people.
Jus’ quit lyin’ to ’em.”

Jackie “Moms” Mabley

Sunday, January 2, 2005

Sunday January 2, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:20 AM
Feast of Stephen

“Time had been canceled….
 And here he was again, in the ballroom.”

— Stephen King, The Shining

From a year ago today:

Heaven was kind of a hat on the universe,
a lid that kept everything underneath it
where it belonged.”

 — Carrie Fisher,
Postcards from the Edge

     

720 in  
the Book”

and
Paradise

From today’s New York Times:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050102-Shaw.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“What’s funny, honey?”
The Shining

Truth and Style and Always in Style.

Saturday, January 1, 2005

Saturday January 1, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:08 AM

Metamorphosis

This illustration was added yesterday
to Geometry of the 4×4 Square.

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