Log24

Tuesday, May 31, 2005

Tuesday May 31, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:06 PM

Subject and Predicates

“A Chu space is a set X of subjects and a set A of predicates on those subjects. These stand in a symbiotic relationship in which the nature of each is determined by the other. Each subject is characterized by the values the predicates take on it, while each predicate is characterized by its values on subjects.”

— Vaughan Pratt, Chu Spaces

Sambin's Basic Picture

Click here for Sambin’s paper (ps).

It would seem that Pratt and Sambin need to reconcile their similar predicates for the same subject.

For some background on Sambin’s approach to the subject, see

Mathematical Modal Logic:
A View of its Evolution (pdf),
by Robert Goldblatt at
Victoria University of Wellington’s
Centre for Logic, Language,
and Computation

For some background on Pratt’s approach to the subject, see

Information Transfer
Across Chu Spaces
(pdf),
by Johan van Benthem
at the University of Amsterdam’s
Institute for Logic, Language,
and Computation

For a gloss on Sambin’s words
The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/SambinBP1-Diamondx.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
see the Log24 entry of Epiphany, 2005.

Sunday, May 29, 2005

Sunday May 29, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:00 PM

Just Say Non

“French opposition to the draft European constitution is being undermined by an onslaught of state-funded propaganda ‘worthy of Fidel Castro,’ according to France’s most eurosceptic leader of the Right, Philippe de Villiers.”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050529-DeVilliers.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

de Villiers

telegraph.co.uk May 4, 2005

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050529-NON.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

telegraph.co.uk May 30, 2005

Saturday, May 28, 2005

Saturday May 28, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:25 PM

Immoveable Feast

Today is a holiday of the Roman Catholic Church: the feast of St. Germain, Bishop of Paris.  St. Germain is now known for the neighborhood that bears his name, home to what is said to be the oldest church in Paris, and a boulevard…

"… I met Joyce who was walking along the Boulevard St.-Germain after having been to a matinée alone.  He liked to listen to the actors, although he could not see them.  He asked me to have a drink with him and we went to the Deux-Magots…."

— Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast
 
Two writers walk into a bar….

Saturday May 28, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Midnight in the Garden,
continued:

Birth and Death

Today's birthdays:
Kylie Minogue and John Fogerty.
Get well soon, Bad Moon.

And in memory of Eddie Albert,
a talented actor who died
on Thursday, May 26, 2005,
at his home in California
and was born on April 22, 1906,
in Rock Island, Illinois:

Well if you want to ride
you gotta ride it like you find it.
Get your ticket at the station
of the Rock Island Line.


Among his films:

Escape to Witch Mountain.

Friday, May 27, 2005

Friday May 27, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:25 PM
Drama of the Diagonal,
Part Deux

Wednesday’s entry The Turning discussed a work by Roger Cooke.  Cooke presents a

“fanciful story (based on Plato’s dialogue Meno).”

The History of Mathematics is the title of the Cooke book.

Associated Press thought for today:

“History is not, of course, a cookbook offering pretested recipes. It teaches by analogy, not by maxims. It can illuminate the consequences of actions in comparable situations, yet each generation must discover for itself what situations are in fact comparable.”
 — Henry Kissinger (whose birthday is today)

For Henry Kissinger on his birthday:
a link to Geometry for Jews.

This link suggests a search for material
on the art of Sol LeWitt, which leads to
an article by Barry Cipra,
The “Sol LeWitt” Puzzle:
A Problem in 16 Squares
(ps),
a discussion of a 4×4 array
of square linear designs.
  Cipra says that

“If you like, there are three symmetry groups lurking within the LeWitt puzzle:  the rotation/reflection group of order 8, a toroidal group of order 16, and an ‘existential’* group of order 16.  The first group is the most obvious.  The third, once you see it, is also obvious.”

* Jean-Paul Sartre,
  Being and Nothingness,
  Philosophical Library, 1956
  [reference by Cipra]

For another famous group lurking near, if not within, a 4×4 array, click on Kissinger’s birthday link above.

Kissinger’s remark (above) on analogy suggests the following analogy to the previous entry’s (Drama of the Diagonal) figure:
 

  The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/021126-diagonH2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Logos Alogos II:
Horizon

This figure in turn, together with Cipra’s reference to Sartre, suggests the following excerpts (via Amazon.com)–

From Sartre’s Being and Nothingness, translated by Hazel E. Barnes, 1993 Washington Square Press reprint edition:

1. on Page 51:
“He makes himself known to himself from the other side of the world and he looks from the horizon toward himself to recover his inner being.  Man is ‘a being of distances.'”
2. on Page 154:
“… impossible, for the for-itself attained by the realization of the Possible will make itself be as for-itself–that is, with another horizon of possibilities.  Hence the constant disappointment which accompanies repletion, the famous: ‘Is it only this?’….”
3. on Page 155:
“… end of the desires.  But the possible repletion appears as a non-positional correlate of the non-thetic self-consciousness on the horizon of the  glass-in-the-midst-of-the-world.”
4. on Page 158:
“…  it is in time that my possibilities appear on the horizon of the world which they make mine.  If, then, human reality is itself apprehended as temporal….”
5. on Page 180:
“… else time is an illusion and chronology disguises a strictly logical order of  deducibility.  If the future is pre-outlined on the horizon of the world, this can be only by a being which is its own future; that is, which is to come….”
6. on Page 186:
“…  It appears on the horizon to announce to me what I am from the standpoint of what I shall be.”
7. on Page 332:
“… the boat or the yacht to be overtaken, and the entire world (spectators, performance, etc.) which is profiled on the horizon.  It is on the common ground of this co-existence that the abrupt revelation of my ‘being-unto-death’….”
8. on Page 359:
“… eyes as objects which manifest the look.  The Other can not even be the object aimed at emptily at the horizon of my being for the Other.”
9. on Page 392:
“… defending and against which he was leaning as against a wail, suddenly opens fan-wise and becomes the foreground, the welcoming horizon toward which he is fleeing for refuge.”
10.  on Page 502:
“… desires her in so far as this sleep appears on the ground of consciousness. Consciousness therefore remains always at the horizon of the desired body; it makes the meaning and the unity of the body.”
11.  on Page 506:
“… itself body in order to appropriate the Other’s body apprehended as an organic totality in situation with consciousness on the horizon— what then is the meaning of desire?”
12.  on Page 661:
“I was already outlining an interpretation of his reply; I transported myself already to the four corners of the horizon, ready to return from there to Pierre in order to understand him.”
13.  on Page 754:
“Thus to the extent that I appear to myself as creating objects by the sole relation of appropriation, these objects are myself.  The pen and the pipe, the clothing, the desk, the house– are myself.  The totality of my possessions reflects the totality of my being.  I am what I have.  It is I myself which I touch in this cup, in this trinket.  This mountain which I climb is myself to the extent that I conquer it; and when I am at its summit, which I have ‘achieved’ at the cost of this same effort, when I attain this magnificent view of the valley and the surrounding peaks, then I am the view; the panorama is myself dilated to the horizon, for it exists only through me, only for me.”

Illustration of the
last horizon remark:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050527-CipraLogo.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050527-CIPRAview.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
 
From CIPRA – Slovenia,
the Institute for the
Protection of the Alps

For more on the horizon, being, and nothingness, see

Thursday, May 26, 2005

Thursday May 26, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:23 PM
Drama of the Diagonal
“The beautiful in mathematics
resides in contradiction.
Incommensurability, logoi alogoi, was
the first splendor in mathematics.”
— Simone Weil, Oeuvres Choisies,
éd. Quarto
, Gallimard, 1999, p. 100

Logos Alogos
by S. H. Cullinane

“To a mathematician, mathematical entities have their own existence, they habitate spaces created by their intention.  They do things, things happen to them, they relate to one another.  We can imagine on their behalf all sorts of stories, providing they don’t contradict what we know of them.  The drama of the diagonal, of the square…

— Dennis Guedj, abstract of “The Drama of Mathematics,” a talk to be given this July at the Mykonos conference on mathematics and narrative.

For the drama of the diagonal of the square, see

Thursday May 26, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:00 AM
The Changing

The previous entry dealt with a transformation
of the diamond figure from Plato’s Meno
into a visual proof of the Pythagorean theorem:

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/DiamondTurning.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Here is a transformation of Plato’s diamond
into the “gyronny” pattern of heraldry:

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/Gyronny.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Viking Heraldry

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/DiamondChanging2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

For the mathematics dealing with
this sort of transformation, see
The Diamond 16 Puzzle and Diamond Theory.

Wednesday, May 25, 2005

Wednesday May 25, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:22 PM

The Turning

Readers who have an Amazon.com account may view book pages relevant to the previous entry.  See page 77 of The Way We Think, by Fauconnier and Turner (Amazon search term = Meno).  This page discusses both the Pythagorean theorem and Plato's diamond figure in the Meno, but fails to "blend" these two topics.  See also page 53 of The History of Mathematics, by Roger Cooke (first edition), where these two topics are in fact blended (Amazon search term = Pythagorean).  The illustration below is drawn from the Cooke book.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050525-Figs.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Cooke demonstrates how the Pythagorean theorem might have been derived by "blending" Plato's diamond (left) with the idea of moving the diamond's corners (right).

The previous entry dealt with a conference on mathematics and narrative.  Above is an example I like of mathematics…. Here is an example I like of narrative:

Kate felt quite dizzy. She didn't know exactly what it was
that had just happened, but she felt pretty damn  certain  that
it  was  the  sort of experience that her mother would not have
approved of on a first date.
     "Is this all part of what we have to do to go to  Asgard?"
she said. "Or are you just fooling around?"
     "We will go to Asgard...now," he said.
     At that moment he raised his hand as if to pluck an apple,
but instead of plucking he made a tiny, sharp turning movement.
The effect  was as if he had twisted the entire world through a
billionth part of a billionth  part  of  a  degree.  Everything
shifted,  was  for  a  moment  minutely  out of focus, and then
snapped back again as a suddenly different world.

— Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul

And here is a blend of the concepts "Asgard" and "conference":

"
Asgard
    During the Interuniverse Society conference,
    a bridge was opened to Valhalla…."

  Bifrost
     In Norse myth, the rainbow bridge
     that connected Earth to Asgard,
     home of the gods.  It was extended
     to Tellus Tertius during the
     Interuniverse Society conference"

— From A Heinlein Concordance

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050525-Rainbow.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

— Front page picture from a
local morning newspaper published
today, Wednesday, May 25, 2005

As George Balanchine once asked,
"How much story do you want?"

Wednesday May 25, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM
Midnight in the Garden
continued

“Poetry is a satisfying of
the desire for resemblance….
If resemblance is described as
a partial similarity between
two dissimilar things,
it complements and reinforces
that which the two dissimilar things
have in common.
It makes it brilliant.”

— Wallace Stevens,
    “Three Academic Pieces” in
    The Necessary Angel (1951)

Two dissimilar things:

1.  A talk to be given at a conference on “Mathematics and Narrative” in Mykonos in July:

Mark Turner,
“The Role of Narrative Imagining in Blended Mathematical Concepts” —

Abstract:
The Way We Think (Gilles Fauconnier and Mark Turner; Basic Books, 2002) presents a theory of conceptual integration, or “blending,” as a basic mental operation. See http://blending.stanford.edu. This talk will explore some ways in which narrative imagining plays a role in blended mathematical concepts.”

2.  An application of the “conceptual blending” of  Fauconnier and Turner to some journal entries of 2004:  Cognitive Blending and the Two Cultures.

Tuesday, May 24, 2005

Tuesday May 24, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:00 PM
Final Arrangements, continued:

Two Poles

From today’s New York Times:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050524-NYT.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

From erraticimpact.com on Paul Ricoeur:

“Ricoeur reserves his greatest admiration for
the narratologist Algirdas-Julien Greimas.
[See below.]
Ricoeur also explores the relationship
between the philosophical and religious
domains, attempting to reconcile
the two poles in his thought.”

From today’s NYT obituary of Sol Stetin:

“Mr. Stetin, who emigrated from Poland at the age of 10 and dropped out of high school in the ninth grade, was fond of saying he got his education in the labor movement.”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050524-JP2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.


“… it is not in isolation that the rhetorical power of such oppositions resides, but in their articulation in relation to other oppositions. In Aristotle’s Physics the four elements of earth, air, fire and water were said to be opposed in pairs. For more than two thousand years oppositional patterns based on these four elements were widely accepted as the fundamental structure underlying surface reality….


The structuralist semiotician Algirdas Greimas introduced the semiotic square (which he adapted from the ‘logical square’ of scholastic philosophy) as a means of analysing paired concepts more fully….”

Daniel Chandler, Semiotics for Beginners

Related material:

Poetry’s Bones and
Theme and Variations.

Other readings on polarity:

Log24, May 24, 2003, and
from July 26, 2003:

Bright Star and Dark Lady

“Mexico is a solar country — but it is also a black country, a dark country. This duality of Mexico has preoccupied me since I was a child.”

Octavio Paz,
quoted by Homero Aridjis

Bright Star

Amen.

Dark Lady

Monday, May 23, 2005

Monday May 23, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM
Elementary Art

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050523-Dorazio3.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Piero Dorazio, 1982

From the J. Paul Getty Trust:

"I've recently had it brought to my attention that the current accepted primary colors are magenta, cyan, and yellow. I teach elementary art and I'm wondering if I really need to point out that fact or if I should continue referring to the primary colors the way I always have — red, yellow, and blue! Anyone have an opinion?"

Color vs. Pigment
("CMYK" at Whatis.com):

"There is a fundamental difference between color and pigment. Color represents energy radiated…. Pigments, as opposed to colors, represent energy that is not absorbed…."

Illustrations from
Color Box Applet:

 
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050523-Mixing.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
 
Another good background page
for elementary color education:

Colored Shadow Explorations.

A good starting point for
non-elementary education:

The "Color" category in Wikipedia.

Further background:

From "The Relations between
Poetry and Painting," by Wallace Stevens:

"The theory of poetry, that is to say, the total of the theories of poetry, often seems to become in time a mystical theology or, more simply, a mystique. The reason for this must by now be clear. The reason is the same reason why the pictures in a museum of modern art often seem to become in time a mystical aesthetic, a prodigious search of appearance, as if to find a way of saying and of establishing that all things, whether below or above appearance, are one and that it is only through reality, in which they are reflected or, it may be, joined together, that we can reach them. Under such stress, reality changes from substance to subtlety, a subtlety in which it was natural for Cézanne to say: 'I see planes bestriding each other and sometimes straight lines seem to me to fall' or 'Planes in color. . . . The colored area where shimmer the souls of the planes, in the blaze of the kindled prism, the meeting of planes in the sunlight.' The conversion of our Lumpenwelt went far beyond this. It was from the point of view of another subtlety that Klee could write: 'But he is one chosen that today comes near to the secret places where original law fosters all evolution. And what artist would not establish himself there where the organic center of all movement in time and space—which he calls the mind or heart of creation— determines every function.' Conceding that this sounds a bit like sacerdotal jargon, that is not too much to allow to those that have helped to create a new reality, a modern reality, since what has been created is nothing less."

From Bester's The Deceivers (1981):

He stripped, went to his Japanese bed in the monk's cell, thrashed, swore, and slept at last, dreaming

crazed p a t t e r n s
           a t t e r n s
           t t e r n s
           t e r n s
           e r n s
           r n s
           n s
           s

Monday May 23, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:56 AM

Final Arrangements
continued:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050523-522Obits2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Elements:

 
  PIERO DORAZIO

  (1927 – 2005) 

  The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050523-Dorazio1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

  Aquatint, 1982
  Plate 9.5 x 9 cm | Sheet 24 x 16 cm
  99 copies signed and numbered
  from 1/99 to 99/99,
  15 from I/XV to XV/XV
  Copy 11/99
  Printed by Renzo Romero, Rome.
  This artwork accompanies the book
 
Staras by Guido Ballo,
  edition Galleria Rizzardi, Milan (1982).
 
  Edizioni l’Obliquo, Galleria di Grafica

Elegant.” — The Daily Telegraph

Sunday, May 22, 2005

Sunday May 22, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 4:09 PM

The Diamond in the Labyrinth

From the labyrinth of Solitude:

  1. An Invariant Feast
  2. Columbia News obituary of Robert D. Cumming
  3. Solitude

    (Phenomenology and Deconstruction, Vol 4
    by Robert Denoon Cumming)

    On page 13 of Solitude —

    From Heidegger’s “Letter on Humanism” —
    “… so long as philosophy merely busies itself with continually obstructing the possibility of admission to the subject of thinking– that is, the truth of being– it escapes the danger of ever being broken against the hardness of that subject.  Thus ‘philosophizing’ about the shattering is separated by an abyss from a thinking that is shattered.”

    This suggests a search for
    “Heidegger” + “diamond,” which yields —

  4. The Diamond at the End of Time,
    which leads to
  5. Orson Welles Interviews Jilly Dybka,
    which leads to
  6. Poetry Hut Blog,
    which leads to

  7. Fair Territory, by Jilly Dybka,
    which contains the following —
  8. The Quickening

    I hold my breath, the plane’s
       wheels under me
    still suspended in the minutes after
    takeoff, when the planet’s brute gravity
    statistically can cause a disaster.
    We are flying low enough that I scan
    civilization in miniature.
    Blue pill swimming pools, and
       roadways that fan
    out like ribbons in the wind. On the sure
    crust, too, a baseball diamond.
       Young boys race
    across the tilted surface, mute and small,
    kicking up red dust. First base, Second base,
    Third Base, Home. We ascend into nightfall
    and beneath the broken stars one kid bunts.
    I remember I was a rookie once.

  9. From yesterday’s online New York Times:

    The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050521-ConeyIslandCrash.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Nine is a Vine.

Sunday May 22, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:25 PM
The Shining
of Friday the 13th

From Margalit Fox in today’s New York Times:

“Eddie Barclay, who for three decades after World War II was arguably the most powerful music mogul in Europe and inarguably the most flamboyant, died on [Friday] May 13 in Paris. He was 84….

… Mr. Barclay was best known for three things: popularizing American jazz in France in the postwar years; keeping the traditional French chanson alive into the age of rock ‘n’ roll; and presiding over parties so lavish that they were considered just the tiniest bit excessive even by the standards of the French Riviera….

Among the guests at some of his glittering parties… Jack Nicholson….”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050522-Jack.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

“Joyce’s confidant in Zurich in 1918, Frank Budgen, luckily for us described the process of writing Ulysses…. ‘Not Bloom, not Stephen is here the principal personage, but Dublin itself… All towns are labyrinths…’  While working… Joyce bought a game called Labyrinth, which he played every evening for a time with his daughter, Lucia. From this game he cataloged the six main errors of judgment into which one might fall in seeking a way out of a maze.”

quoted by Bruce Graham from The Creators by Daniel Boorstin

“We’ll always have Paris.”

An Invariant Feast, Log24, Sept. 6, 2004

Saturday, May 21, 2005

Saturday May 21, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:29 PM
Icarus at Boardwalk

“As in Monopoly, the fortunes of
the Boardwalk depend on the roll of
the dice.  It’s the final stop on the
game board, the crown jewel….”

Eileen Smith, Sept. 6, 2004

A link from Log24 last night:

A Throw of the Dice:
The Life of Stéphane Mallarmé

From Log24 on Aug. 29, 2003:

Atlantic City

‘He landed on Park Place!’

Charles Lindbergh seems to have done
just that.  See yesterday’s entry

Spirit.

From today’s online New York Times:

4 Killed as Small Plane Crashes
in Coney Island

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050521-ConeyIslandCrash.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

What moral may be drawn from these
narratives, I do not know.

For Mallarmé‘s own views, see
Un coup de Dés jamais n’abolira le Hasard.

Saturday May 21, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:35 PM
History As She Is Writ

“Finally, there is the matter of players
changing history as she is writ.”

— “Historical Fantasy Campaigns
for Role Playing Simulations
,”
published in Phantasmagoria,
Murdoch Alternative Reality
Society Annual, 2004, pp. 32-38

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050521-Zeitung.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Franken is best known as the author of
Lies and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them.

Saturday May 21, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:16 AM
Terminator

From a March 10, 2004, entry:

“Language was no more than a collection of meaningless conventional signs, and life could absurdly end at any moment.  [Mallarmé] became aware, in Millan’s* words, ‘of the extremely fine line

separating absence and presence, being and nothingness, life and death, which later … he could place at the very centre of his work and make the cornerstone of his personal philosophy and his mature poetics.’ “

— John Simon, Squaring the Circle

* A Throw of the Dice: The Life of Stéphane Mallarmé, by Gordon Millan

For those who prefer
art that is more lurid:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050520-epi3.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
(Photo in lower half
from Cinetribulations)

Related material:

Pilate, Truth, and
Friday the Thirteenth

and

Nothing Nothings (Again)

Friday, May 20, 2005

Friday May 20, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:20 PM

The Shining of Apollo

“Plato’s most significant passage may be found in Phaedrus 265b: ‘And we made four divisions of the divine madness, ascribing them to four gods, saying that prophecy was inspired by Apollo, the mystic madness by Dionysos, the poetic by the Muses, and the madness of love […] by Aphrodite and Eros’ (trans. by H.N. Fowler, in the Loeb Classical Library).”

Saverio Marchignoli, note on section 20, paragraphs 115-119, of the Discourse on the Dignity of Man (Oratio de hominis dignitate) (1486) by Pico della Mirandola, considered the “Manifesto of the Renaissance.”

Related material:
A Mass for Lucero,
The Shining of May 29,
Shining Forth,
Sermon for St. Patrick’s Day, and the phrase
Diamond Struck by the Sun.

Thursday, May 19, 2005

Thursday May 19, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:10 AM
Shining Through

“Schon in der Antike gab es zwei Definitionen der Schönheit, die in einem gewissen Gegensatz zueinander standen…. Die eine bezeichnet die Schönheit als die richtige Übereinstimmung der Teile miteinander und mit dem Ganzen.  Die andere, auf Plotin zurückgehend, ohne jede Bezugnahme auf Teile, bezeichnet sie als das Durchleuchten des ewigen Glanzes des ‘Einen’ durch die materielle Erscheinung.”

Werner Heisenberg

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050519-Anakin.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“Heisenberg sets down his glass. ‘Perhaps I may remind you of the second definition of beauty, which stems from Plotinus: “Beauty is the translucence, through the material phenomenon, of the eternal splendor of the One.”‘….

It’s that translucence, that light shining through, that brings us to tears, wherever we find it…. As Sidney Bechet put it, ‘You’ve got to be in the sun to feel the sun.'”

— Matt Glaser, Satchmo, the Philosopher,
Village Voice Jazz Supplement,
June 6-12, 2001

Wednesday, May 18, 2005

Wednesday May 18, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:07 PM
On Beauty

“Beauty is the proper conformity
  of the parts to one another
  and to the whole.”
 
  — Werner Heisenberg,
Die Bedeutung des Schönen
  in der exakten Naturwissenschaft,”
  address delivered to the
  Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts,
  Munich, 9 Oct. 1970, reprinted in
  Heisenberg’s Across the Frontiers,
  translated by Peter Heath,
  Harper & Row, 1974
 
  Related material:
 
 The Eightfold Cube
 
 The Eightfold Cube


Wednesday May 18, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Lindbergh's Eden

"The Garden of Eden is behind us
and there is no road back to innocence;
we can only go forward."

— Anne Morrow Lindbergh,
Earth Shine, p. xii
 

Saturday, May 14, 2005

Saturday May 14, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 PM
The Nine

"Nine is a very powerful Nordic number."
— Katherine Neville, author of The Eight,

IMAGE- Cover of 'The Magic Circle,' by Katherine Neville

in The Magic Circle

"To live is to defend a form."
("Leben, das heisst eine Form verteidigen")
attributed to Hölderlin

In defense of the nine-square grid:

Constructing a translation plane based on the ninefold square

For details on the above picture, see
Translation Plane.

Saturday May 14, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 PM


Art at Princeton

From Princeton University Press,
A. W. Mellon Lectures in the
Bollingen Series:

The Bollingen Cross
The Bollingen Cross
or “Gnostic wheel
of Princeton U. Press

Paths to the Absolute:
Mondrian, Malevich, Kandinsky,
Pollock, Newman, Rothko, and Still
by John Golding

Cloth | 2000 | $65.00 | ISBN: 0-691-04896-7
240 pp. | 7 x 10 | 63 color plates 109 halftones

This may illuminate Krauss’s remarks on
Mondrian and Malevich at the
conclusion of the previous entry.

Saturday May 14, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:00 PM
Powers,
continued

Today’s New York Times:

“Horton Marlais Davies, Putnam professor emeritus of religion at Princeton and an author of many books about church history, died on Wednesday at his home in Princeton, N.J. He was 89…. Dr. Davies specialized in the impact of Christianity on the arts.”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050514-Cover2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

A book edited by Horton Davies,
apparently first published by Eerdmans
at Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1990

The Catholic Encyclopedia (1908) on the communion of saints:

“One cannot read the parables of the kingdom (Matt., xiii) without perceiving its corporate nature and the continuity which links together the kingdom in our midst and the kingdom to come. The nature of that communion, called by St. John a fellowship with one another (‘a fellowship with us’ — I John, i, 3) because it is a fellowship with the Father, and with his Son, and compared by him to the organic and vital union of the vine and its branches (John, xv), stands out….”
 
Related material:

Religious art in the entry Art History of 11 AM Wednesday, May 11, the date of Davies’s death.  See also the following direct and indirect links from that entry:

To a cruciform artifact from the current film Kingdom of Heaven, to an entry quoting John xv, Nine is a Vine, and to Art Theory for Yom Kippur.

For less-religious material on the number nine, see the entries and links in the Log24 archive for June 17-30, 2004.

From Rosalind Krauss, “Grids”:

“If we open any tract–
Plastic Art and Pure Plastic Art
or The Non-Objective World,
for instance– we will find that
Mondrian and Malevich are not
discussing canvas or pigment or
graphite or any other form of
matter.  They are talking about
Being or Mind or Spirit.”

Amen.

Friday, May 13, 2005

Friday May 13, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Powers

From today’s New York Times

Francesco Marchisano, made a cardinal
on October 21, 2003:

“All the saints have powers.”

Tonight at 8 PM ET on Fox: X-Men.

Wednesday, May 11, 2005

Wednesday May 11, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:11 PM
Goodbye Girl

  From a goodbye letter
by a girl named
  Lucero in Cuernavaca
  in the early 1960’s:

Si me de veras quieres,
deja me en paz
.”

(See Shining Forth.)

Today’s birthdays —
   Natasha Richardson,
   Martha Quinn,         
   Frances Fisher —     
 remind me of        

 

The Sprite and the Synergist
chapter in Bester’s The Deceivers:

Three drinks later he was suddenly inspired.  “What I need right now is a girl to lose myself in.  That’s the only way to wait for a pattern to show.”

One of his reciprocal Rogues (he had a dozen alternate selves) answered, “Feel free, but you left your big red book in the workshop.”

“Why, for jigjeeze sake, can’t I have the little black book, famed in song and story?”

“Why can’t you remember a phone number?  Never mind.  Shall we join the ladies?”

He made three calls, all negative.  He had three more drinks, all positive.  He stripped, went to his Japanese bed in the monk’s cell, thrashed, swore, and slept at last, dreaming

crazed p a t t e r n s
           a t t e r n s
           t t e r n s
           t e r n s
           e r n s
           r n s
           n s
           s

“Whenever I want you,
all I have to do is…”

Deja me en paz…

Related material:

Octavio Paz

Wednesday May 11, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:00 PM
De Arco

… y eres tú y soy yo
y es un caminarte en círculo
dar a tus hechos dimensión de arco
y a solas con tu impulso decirte la palabra.

Homero Aridjis

For Lucero:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050511-Montreat-logo.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Lucero as portrayed by Megan Follows Established in 1916,
Montreat College
is a private, Christian college
located in a beautiful valley
in the Blue Ridge Mountains
of North Carolina.

From Nell:

Wednesday May 11, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:00 AM
Art History

Reuters – “Joe Grant, a legendary Disney artist who designed the Queen/Witch in ‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,’ died of a heart attack while doing what he loved most, drawing, the Walt Disney Co. said Monday.

Grant, 96, died at his home in the Los Angeles suburb of Glendale last Friday while sitting at his drawing board.”

“With a little effort, anything can be
shown to connect with anything else:
existence is infinitely cross-referenced.”

— Opening sentence of
Martha Cooley’s The Archivist

From Log24 last Friday,
a Greek cross:

Pandora's box, according to Rosalind Krauss

Click on picture for details.
 
And from Sunday, May 1
(Orthodox Easter)
:

Rosalind Krauss,

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050501-Krauss.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Columbia University’s
Meyer Schapiro Professor
of Modern Art and Theory:

“There is no painter in the West
who can be unaware of
the symbolic power of
the cruciform shape1
and the Pandora’s box

The Wicked Queen's Box

of spiritual reference2
that is opened
once one uses it.”
Click on pictures for details.
Related material:
Nine is a Vine3.

1, 2, 3 Today’s birthdays:

1 Natasha Richardson, born 11 May 1963,
   Jedi wife and costar of Nell
2 Martha Quinn, born 11 May 1959,
   MTV wit
3 Frances Fisher, born 11 May 1952,
   dazzling redhead

Monday, May 9, 2005

Monday May 9, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:12 PM
Europe Marks Nazis’ Surrender

Boston Globe on events of
Sunday, May 8, 2005

“After all, tomorrow is another day.”
Gone with the Wind

derStandard.at

15 April 2005

Adolf Holl -- Foto: APA/Gindl

Adolf Holl
wird Sixtus VI.


Adolf Holl, Jg. 1930, war Kaplan und Dozent an der Katholisch- Theologischen Fakultät der Universität Wien; 1973 wurde ihm die kirchliche Lehrerlaubnis entzogen, 1976 das Priesteramt; er lebt und arbeitet als freier Schriftsteller in Wien. Das Büchlein “Falls ich Papst werden sollte. Ein Szenario” (1998, List-Verlag), dem die hier abgedruckten Passagen – mit Ausnahme des Post Skriptums – entnommen sind, ist leider schon vergriffen; Abdruck mit freundlicher Genehmigung des Autors.

Falls ich Papst werden sollte…
Kaum zu glauben: Adolf Holl wirft alle Papabile-Charts über den Haufen und empfiehlt sich dem am Montag beginnenden Konklave als Pontifex Sixtus VI. – kursorische Notizen eines Außenseiters


“Ich bin der Präfekt der Kongregation für die Glaubenslehre, Eure Heiligkeit. Aber natürlich. Entschuldigen Sie meine Vergesslichkeit. Möchten Sie einen Espresso? Mit oder ohne Milch?

Den Espresso mache ich lieber selber, auf einer Pavoni- Maschine. Zum Präfekten der Glaubenskongregation werde ich sagen: Besorgen Sie mir die besten Übersetzungen der Werke Ephräm, des Syrers (Kirchenschriftsteller, gest. 373) ins Deutsche. Und eine kommentierte Liste aller Fachleute, die über ihn gearbeitet haben. Das wird den Präfekten eine Weile beschäftigen.”


St. Ephrem the Syrian
(about 306 AD – 373 AD)

“He… acquired honor as
 a Christian musician and poet.
He was so accomplished in both arts
that he was called the
lyre of the Holy Spirit.'”

Pope Benedict XV

Sunday, May 8, 2005

Sunday May 8, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:31 AM

Today’s Sermon:

“Holl, Adolf” pneumatology
.

Sunday May 8, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Geometry and Theology

See

the science fiction writer mentioned in a Friday entry.

Mark Olson’s article is at the website of the New England Science Fiction Association, publisher of Ingathering: The Complete People Stories of Zenna Henderson.  This book, by one of my favorite science-fiction authors, was apparently edited by the same Mark Olson.

The following remarks seem relevant to the recurring telepathy theme in Henderson:

From the first article cited above,
David L. Neuhouser,
Higher Dimensions in the Writings of C. S. Lewis (pdf):

“If we are three-dimensional cross-sections of four-dimensional reality, perhaps we are parts of the same body. In fact, we know we are parts of the same body in some way, this four-dimensional idea just may help us to see it more clearly. Remember the preceding comments are mine, not Lewis’s. He puts it this way, ‘That we can die “in” Adam and live “in” Christ seems to me to imply that man as he really is differs a good deal from man as our categories of thought and our three-dimensional imaginations represent him; that the separateness… which we discern between individuals, is balanced, in absolute reality, by some kind of inter-inanimation of which we have no conception at all. It may be that the acts and sufferings of great archetypal individuals such as Adam and Christ are ours, not by legal fiction, metaphor, or causality, but in some much deeper fashion. There is no question, of course, of individuals melting down into a kind of spiritual continuum such as Pantheistic systems believe in; that is excluded by the whole tenor of our faith.'”

From Webster’s Unabridged, 1913 edition:

inanimate
, v. t.

[Pref. in- in (or intensively) + animate.]
 To animate. [Obs.] — Donne.

inanimation, n.

Infusion of life or vigor;
animation; inspiration.
[Obs.]
The inanimation of Christ
living and breathing within us.
Bp. Hall.

Related words…

Also from the 1913 Webster’s:

circumincession, n.

[Pref. circum- + L. incedere, incessum, to walk.]
(Theol.) The reciprocal existence in each other
of the three persons of the Trinity.

From an online essay:

perichoresis
, n.

“The term means mutual indwelling or, better, mutual interpenetration and refers to the understanding of both the Trinity and Christology. In the divine perichoresis, each person has ‘being in each other without coalescence’ (John of Damascus ca. 650). The roots of this doctrine are long and deep.”

—  Bert Waggoner

coinherence, n.

“In our human experience of personhood, at any rate in a fallen world, there is in each person an inevitable element of exclusiveness, of opaqueness and impenetrability.  But with the three divine persons it is not so.  Each is entirely ‘open’ to the others, totally transparent and receptive.  This transparency and receptivity is summed up in the Greek notion of perichoresis, which Gibbon once called ‘the deepest and darkest corner of the whole theological abyss.’  Rendered in Latin as circumincessio and in English usually as ‘coinherence,’ the Greek term means literally, cyclical movement, and so reciprocity, interchange, mutual indwelling.  The prefix peri bears the sense ‘around,’ while choresis is linked with chora, ‘room,’ space,’ ‘place’ or ‘container,’ and with chorein, to ‘go,’ ‘advance,’ ‘make room for’ or ‘contain.’  Some also see a connection with choros, ‘dance,’ and so they take perichoresis to mean ’round dance.’  Applied to Christ, the term signifies that his two natures, the divine and the human, interpenetrate one another without separation and without confusion.  Applied to the Trinity, it signifies that each person ‘contains’ the other two and ‘moves’ within them.  In the words of St Gregory of Nyssa, ‘All that is the Father’s is seen in the Son, and all that is the Son’s belongs also the Father. For the whole Son abides in the Father, and he has in his turn the whole Father abiding in himself.’ 

By virtue of this perichoresis, Father, Son and Holy Spirit ‘coinhere‘ in one another, each dwelling in the other two through an unceasing movement of mutual love – the ’round dance’ of the Trinity.”

— Timothy Ware, Bishop Kallistos of Diokleia,
    The Human Person as an Icon of the Trinity

Friday, May 6, 2005

Friday May 6, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 7:28 PM

Fugues

"To improvise an eight-part fugue
is really beyond human capability."

— Douglas R. Hofstadter,
Gödel, Escher, Bach

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/cube2x2x2.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Order of a projective
 automorphism group:
168

"There are possibilities of
contrapuntal arrangement
of subject-matter."

— T. S. Eliot, quoted in
Origins of Form in Four Quartets.

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/Grid4x4A.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Order of a projective
 automorphism group:
20,160

Friday May 6, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 2:56 PM
Involved

Trinity symbol
(See Sequel.)

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/KleinDualInsideOut200.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Trinity symbol
by Greg Egan
(via John Baez)

Involved:

 

"Difficult to understand because of intricacy: byzantine, complex, complicated, convoluted, daedal, Daedalian, elaborate, intricate, involute, knotty, labyrinthine, tangled."

— Roget's II: The New Thesaurus, Third Edition

See also the previous three entries,
as well as Symmetries.

 

Friday May 6, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:01 PM
Apocalypse Wow
continued

From the West Wing time slot:


Revelations Episode 4
(first airing: 9 PM ET Wednesday,
May 4, 2005)


“It’s … extremely weird how the previously-on-Revelations announcer doesn’t seem to be able to draw the distinction between what’s happening in the real world where Revelations is just a cheesy miniseries that’s keeping people from watching Alias and what’s happening in the fake world of the miniseries itself, where they keep promising the apocalypse and it keeps not happening. After the wrap-up of all the nothing that’s come before, the announcer intones ominously, ‘And now, as the end of the world draws near, Revelations continues.’ Well, no. Here, where Revelations is continuing, the end of the world is not drawing near. Or is NBC genuinely aiming for the crowd who thinks The Rapture Index is a valuable and educational resource? Does someone involved here have an actual sense of humor?”

The Flick Filosopher

Friday May 6, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:18 AM
Crystalline

“In Francis Ford Coppola’s film, Col. Kurtz tells how after his medics inoculated a small village, the Reds chopped off every child’s left arm. ‘My God, the genius of that. The genius,’ Kurtz said. ‘The will to do that. Perfect, genuine, complete, crystalline, pure! And then I realized they were stronger than me because they could stand it.'”

Col. David Hackworth
    on Tuesday, April 9, 2002.
    Col. Hackworth died at 74
    on Wednesday, May 4, 2005.

   Related Log24 entries:

   The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050506-GrCross.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041016-ApocalypseNow2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Click on pictures for details.

Wednesday, May 4, 2005

Wednesday May 4, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:00 PM

The Fano Plane
Revisualized:

The Eightfold Cube

or, The Eightfold Cube

Here is the usual model of the seven points and seven lines (including the circle) of the smallest finite projective plane (the Fano plane):

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/Fano.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Every permutation of the plane’s points that preserves collinearity is a symmetry of the  plane.  The group of symmetries of the Fano plane is of order 168 and is isomorphic to the group  PSL(2,7) = PSL(3,2) = GL(3,2). (See Cameron on linear groups (pdf).)

The above model indicates with great clarity six symmetries of the plane– those it shares with the equilateral triangle.  It does not, however, indicate where the other 162 symmetries come from.  

Shown below is a new model of this same projective plane, using partitions of cubes to represent points:

Fano plane with cubes as points

The cubes’ partitioning planes are added in binary (1+1=0) fashion.  Three partitioned cubes are collinear if and only if their partitioning planes’ binary sum equals zero.

The second model is useful because it lets us generate naturally all 168 symmetries of the Fano plane by splitting a cube into a set of four parallel 1x1x2 slices in the three ways possible, then arbitrarily permuting the slices in each of the three sets of four. See examples below.

Fano plane group - generating permutations

For a proof that such permutations generate the 168 symmetries, see Binary Coordinate Systems.

(Note that this procedure, if regarded as acting on the set of eight individual subcubes of each cube in the diagram, actually generates a group of 168*8 = 1,344 permutations.  But the group’s action on the diagram’s seven partitions of the subcubes yields only 168 distinct results.  This illustrates the difference between affine and projective spaces over the binary field GF(2).  In a related 2x2x2 cubic model of the affine 3-space over GF(2) whose “points” are individual subcubes, the group of eight translations is generated by interchanges of parallel 2x2x1 cube-slices.  This is clearly a subgroup of the group generated by permuting 1x1x2 cube-slices.  Such translations in the affine 3-space have no effect on the projective plane, since they leave each of the plane model’s seven partitions– the “points” of the plane– invariant.)

To view the cubes model in a wider context, see Galois Geometry, Block Designs, and Finite-Geometry Models.

For another application of the points-as-partitions technique, see Latin-Square Geometry: Orthogonal Latin Squares as Skew Lines.

For more on the plane’s symmetry group in another guise, see John Baez on Klein’s Quartic Curve and the online book The Eightfold Way.  For more on the mathematics of cubic models, see Solomon’s Cube.

For a large downloadable folder with many other related web pages, see Notes on Finite Geometry.

Tuesday, May 3, 2005

Tuesday May 3, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:29 AM
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050503-Poets.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Monday, May 2, 2005

Monday May 2, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:00 AM
A Dance Results

 

Roger Kimball on Rosalind Krauss's
The Optical Unconscious:

"Professor Krauss even uses many of the same decorations with which she festooned earlier volumes. Bataille’s photograph of a big toe, for example, which I like to think of as her mascot, reappears. As does her favorite doodle, a little graph known as a 'Klein Group' or 'L Schema' whose sides and diagonals sport arrows pointing to corners labeled with various opposing pairs: e.g., 'ground' and 'not ground,' 'figure' and 'not figure.' Professor Krauss seems to believe that this device, lifted from the pages of structuralist theory, illuminates any number of deep mysteries: the nature of modernism, to begin with, but also the essence of gender relations, self-consciousness, perception, vision, castration anxiety, and other pressing conundrums that, as it happens, she has trouble distinguishing from the nature of modernism. Altogether, the doodle is a handy thing to have around. One is not surprised that Professor Krauss reproduces it many times in her new book."
 

From Drid Williams,
The Semiotics of Human Action,
Ritual, and Dance:

A Klein four-group in the context of dance

This is closely related to
Beckett's "Quad" figure

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050501-Quad.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

A Jungian on this six-line figure:

"They are the same six lines
that exist in the I Ching….
Now observe the square more closely:
four of the lines are of equal length,
the other two are longer….
For this reason symmetry
cannot be statically produced
and a dance results."
 
— Marie-Louise von Franz,
Number and Time (1970)

and to the Greimas "semiotic square":

"People have believed in the fundamental character of binary oppositions since at least classical times. For instance, in his Metaphysics Aristotle advanced as primary oppositions: form/matter, natural/unnatural, active/passive, whole/part, unity/variety, before/after and being/not-being.*  But it is not in isolation that the rhetorical power of such oppositions resides, but in their articulation in relation to other oppositions. In Aristotle's Physics the four elements of earth, air, fire and water were said to be opposed in pairs. For more than two thousand years oppositional patterns based on these four elements were widely accepted as the fundamental structure underlying surface reality….

The structuralist semiotician Algirdas Greimas introduced the semiotic square (which he adapted from the 'logical square' of scholastic philosophy) as a means of analysing paired concepts more fully…."

 

Daniel Chandler, Semiotics for Beginners.

* Compare Chandler's list of Aristotle's primary oppositions with Aristotle's list (also in the  Metaphysics) of Pythagorean oppositions (see Midrash Jazz Quartet).
 

Sunday, May 1, 2005

Sunday May 1, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:11 PM
Logos

Harvard’s Barry Mazur on
one mathematical style:

“It’s the barest, most Beckett-like vocabulary
that incorporates the theory and nothing else.”

Samuel Beckett, Quad (1981):

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050501-Quad.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

A Jungian on this six-line logo:

“They are the same six lines
that exist in the I Ching….
Now observe the square more closely:
four of the lines are of equal length,
the other two are longer….
For this reason symmetry
cannot be statically produced
and a dance results.”
 
— Marie-Louise von Franz,
Number and Time (1970),
Northwestern U. Press
paperback, 1979, p. 108

A related logo from
Columbia University’s
Department of Art History
and Archaeology
:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050501-ArtHist2.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
 
Also from that department:

Rosalind Krauss,

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050501-Krauss.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Meyer Schapiro Professor
of Modern Art and Theory:

“There is no painter in the West
who can be unaware of
the symbolic power
of the cruciform shape
and the Pandora’s box
of spiritual reference
that is opened
once one uses it.”

“In the garden of Adding
live Even and Odd…”
— The Midrash Jazz Quartet in
City of God
, by E. L. Doctorow


THE GREEK CROSS

A cross in which all the arms
are the same length.

Here, for reference, is a Greek cross
within a nine-square grid:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050501-GrCross.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 Related religious meditation for
    Doctorow’s “Garden of Adding”…

 4 + 5 = 9.

Types of Greek cross
illustrated in Wikipedia
under “cross“:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/GrCross.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

From designboom.com:

THE BAPTISMAL CROSS

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050501-BaptismalCross.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

is a cross with eight arms:
a Greek cross, which is superimposed
on a Greek ‘chi,’ the first letter
of the Greek word for ‘Christ.’
Since the number eight is symbolic
of rebirth or regeneration,
this cross is often used
as a baptismal cross.

Related material:

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/Symm-axes.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Fritz Leiber’s “spider”
or “double cross” logo.
See Why Me? and
A Shot at Redemption.

Happy Orthodox Easter.

Sunday May 1, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Hooray, Hooray…

Powered by WordPress