Log24

Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Tuesday March 31, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:33 AM
Natasha’s Dance

“It’s a dance
for goodness’ sake.”
— Scott Houston 

New York Times obituaries for the final day of Women's History Month, 2009
For the lyrics, see Sinatra.

Monday, March 30, 2009

Monday March 30, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 6:06 PM
The Rest of the Picture

Lenin at Smolny, c. 1925
by Isaak Israilevich Brodsky

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090330-LeninByBrodsky.jpg

A copy of this picture, with
left and right reversed, appears
on the front and back covers
of the Feb. 2006 MIT Press
 book The Parallax View,
by Slavoj Zizek.

(See previous entry.)

Monday March 30, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:12 PM
Happy Birthday,
Warren Beatty

Parallax illustrated, from Wikipedia-- A star on two background colors, blue and red

Viewpoint A:
Blue —

Warren Beatty in the montage from 'The Parallax View'

Viewpoint B:

Red —

MIT Press:

The Parallax View

Slavoj Zizek
Published on
February 17, 2006

Zizek's book 'The Parallax View,' from MIT Press

Table of Contents and Sample Chapters

The Parallax View is Slavoj Zizek’s most substantial theoretical work to appear in many years; Zizek himself describes it as his magnum opus. Parallax can be defined as the apparent displacement of an object, caused by a change in observational position. Zizek is interested in the “parallax gap” separating two points between which no synthesis or mediation is possible, linked by an “impossible short circuit” of levels that can never meet. From this consideration of parallax, Zizek begins a rehabilitation of dialectical materialism.

“If you liked Badiou,
 you’ll love ‘Zizek!’.”

February 2009 entries  

Sunday, March 29, 2009

Sunday March 29, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 7:48 PM

Getting All
the Meaning In

Webpage heading for the
2009 meeting of the
American Comparative
Literature Association:

ACLA 2009 web page heading with map and alphabetic symbols

The mysterious symbols on
the above map suggest the
following reflections:


From A Cure of the Mind: The Poetics of Wallace Stevens, by Theodore Sampson, published by Black Rose Books Ltd., 2000–

Page x:

"… if what he calls 'the spirit's alchemicana' (CP [Collected Poems] 471) addresses itself to the irrational element in poetry, to what extent is such an element dominant in his theory and practice of poetry, and therefore in what way is Stevens' intricate verbal music dependent on his irrational use of language– a 'pure rhetoric of a language without words?' (CP 374)?"

Related material:

 

From "'When Novelists Become Cubists:' The Prose Ideograms of Guy Davenport," by Andre Furlani:

Laurence Zachar argues that Davenport's writing is situated "aux frontieres intergeneriques" where manifold modes are brought into concord: "L'etonnant chez Davenport est la facon don't ce materiau qui parait l'incarnation meme du chaos– hermetique, enigmatique, obscur, avec son tropplein de references– se revele en fait etre construit, ordonne, structure. Plus l'on s'y plonge, et plus l'on distingue de cohesion dans le texte." 'What astonishes in Davenport is the way in which material that seems the very incarnation of chaos– hermetic, enigmatic, obscure, with its proliferation of allusions– in fact reveals itself to be constructed, organized, structured. The more one immerses oneself in them the more one discerns the texts' cohesion.' (62).

Davenport also works along the intergeneric border between text and graphic, for he illustrates many of his texts. (1) "The prime use of words is for imagery: my writing is drawing," he states in an interview (Hoeppfner 123). Visual imagery is not subordinated to writing in Davenport, who draws on the assemblage practice of superimposing image and writing. "I trust the image; my business is to get it onto the page," he writes in the essay "Ernst Machs Max Ernst." "A page, which I think of as a picture, is essentially a texture of images. […] The text of a story is therefore a continuous graph, kin to the imagist poem, to a collage (Ernst, Willi Baumeister, El Lissitzky), a page of Pound, a Brakhage film" (Geography 374-75).

Note:

(1.) Davenport is an illustrator of books (such as Hugh Kenner's The Stoic Comedians and The Counterfeiters) and journals (such as The Kenyon Review, Parnassus, and Paideuma). His art is the subject of Erik Anderson Reece's monograph, A Balance of Quinces, which reveals the inseparable relationship between Davenport's literary and pictorial work.

References:

Davenport, Guy. The Geography of the Imagination. San Francisco: North Point Press, 1981. Rpt. New York: Pantheon, 1992.

Hoepffner, Bernard. "Pleasant Hill: An Interview with Guy Davenport." Conjunctions 24 (1995): 118-24.

Reece, Erik Anderson. A Balance of Quinces: The Paintings and Drawings of Guy Davenport. New York: New Directions, 1996.

Zachar, Laurence. "Guy Davenport: Une Mosaique du genres." Recherches Anglaises et Nord-Americaines 21 (1994): 51-63.

"… when novelists become Cubists; that is, when they see the possibilities of making a hieroglyph, a coherent symbol, an ideogram of the total work. A symbol comes into being when an artist sees that it is the only way to get all the meaning in."

— Guy Davenport, The Geography of the Imagination

See also last night's
commentary on the
 following symbols:

Diamond Theory version of 'The Square Inch Space' with yin-yang symbol for comparison

Sunday March 29, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:00 AM
Auerbach, Purdy;
Purdy, Auerbach

The 4-day annual meeting
of the American Comparative
 Literature Association
concludes today.
This year the the meeting
is held at Harvard University.
(Program– pdf, 256 pp.)

“But the spirit of rhetoric– a spirit which classified subjects in genera and invested every subject with a specific form of style as one garment becoming it in virtue of its nature [i.e. lower classes with the farcical low-style, upper classes with the tragic, the historic and the sublime elevated-style]– could not extend its dominion to them [the Bible writers] for the simple reason that their subject would not fit into any of the known genres.”

— Erich Auerbach, Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature (Princeton edition of 1953, p. 45, as quoted at Wikipedia)

The Washington Post on its literary columnist Michael Dirda:

“… he holds a PhD in comparative literature from Cornell….”

Dirda on author James Purdy (April 5, 2000):

QUESTION: “What do you make of Purdy and his place in 20th century American fiction?”
 
“A small sidetrack in American literature– a camp novelist, something of a cult figure. Will probably be forgotten in a generation. Malcolm is probably his best bet for survival, but a lot will depend on his readers and whether they can keep his name and fiction before the public. So far they haven’t been doing much of a job. Personally, I think Purdy is a funny, brilliant writer, but that doesn’t assure immortality.”

Steven H. Cullinane on Purdy,
“Radical Emptiness,”
 Friday, March 13th, 2009

“See you in the
  funny papers, Purdy.”

Saturday, March 28, 2009

Saturday March 28, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:07 PM

The Rest
of the Story

Today's previous entry discussed the hermeneutics of the midday NY and PA lottery numbers.

The rest of the story:
 

The Revelation Game
(continued from 7/26, 2008)

 
Lotteries
on Reba's
birthday,
2009
Pennsylvania
(No revelation)
New York
(Revelation)
Mid-day
(No belief)
No belief,
no revelation

726
Revelation
without belief

378
Evening
(Belief)
Belief without
revelation

006
Belief and
revelation

091

Interpretations of the evening numbers–

The PA evening number, 006, may be viewed as a followup to the PA midday 726 (or 7/26, the birthday of Kate Beckinsale and Carl Jung). Here 006 is the prestigious "00" number assigned to Beckinsale.
 

Will: Do you like apples?     
Clark: Yeah.                       
Will: Well, I got her number.
 How do you like them apples?

— "Good Will Hunting

Kate Beckinsale in 'Underworld: Evolution'

The NY evening number, 091, may be viewed as a followup to the NY midday 378 (the number of pages in The Innermost Kernel by Suzanne Gieser, published by Springer, 2005)–

Page 91: The entire page is devoted to the title of the book's Part 3– "The Copenhagen School and Psychology"–
 

Page 91 of 'The Innermost Kernel' by Suzanne Gieser, Springer 2005

The next page begins: "With the crisis of physics, interest in epistemological and psychological questions grew among many theoretical physicists. This interest was particularly marked in the circle around Niels Bohr."
 

A particularly
marked circle
 from March 15:

Diamond Theory version of 'The Square Inch Space' with yin-yang symbol for comparison

The circle above is
marked with a version of
the classic Chinese symbol
adopted as a personal emblem
by Danish physicist Niels Bohr,
leader of the Copenhagen School.

"Two things of opposite natures seem to depend
On one another, as a man depends
On a woman, day on night, the imagined

On the real. This is the origin of change.
Winter and spring, cold copulars, embrace
And forth the particulars of rapture come."

-- Wallace Stevens,
  "Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction,"
   Canto IV of "It Must Change"

The square above is marked
with a graphic design
related to the four-diamond
figure of Jung's Aion.

Saturday March 28, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:28 PM
The Dance
of Chance

Today’s midday
lotteries:

NY 378
PA 726

Interpretation:

The 378 pages of
a book on Pauli and Jung,
The Innermost Kernel

The date, 7/26, of
birth for Jung and for
Kate Beckinsale,
star of
Serendipity

See also today’s previous entry
and “Bright Star and Dark Lady”
from 7/26, 2003.

Saturday March 28, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:00 PM
In memory of
film producer
Steven Bach:

Heaven's Gate (a link in memory of Steven Bach)
 
Xanga footprint from Denmark 3/28/09 7:49 AM leading to Rohatsu Venus entry of 12/8/03
 

Images of time and eternity in memory of Michelangelo

“Time: the moving
  image of eternity.”
Plato   

Happy birthday,
Reba McEntire

Saturday March 28, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:41 PM
xxx

Denmark
Abonti
uid=48323914
(Rohatsu Venus)
3/28/2009
7:49 AM

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Tuesday March 24, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 AM

The Child Trap

See E! Online, March 18 — Lindsay Lohan Remembers Parent Trap Mum

See also
 
http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090324-ChildTrap.jpg

For those who like such things, an excellent Marxist analysis of Watchmen from another fan:

Whitson, Roger. “Panelling Parallax: The Fearful Symmetry of Alan Moore and William Blake.” ImageTexT: Interdisciplinary Comics Studies Vol. 3 No. 2 (2007). Dept. of English, University of Florida.

Whitson’s subject, Alan Moore, is the author of the Watchmen graphic novel. Moore’s style seems less suited to the Forth family pictured above than to Lindsay Lohan fans– who may also enjoy another graphic novel by Moore, Lost Girls.

More Lohan material related to her role in “Georgia Rule“–

Damnation Morning Continued (March 16).

Further background:

“The film realizes that if people actually fought crime, they’d most likely be crazy. Take The Comedian for an example. He fights crime, sure. He’s also a raging alcoholic.” –“‘Watchmen’ a flawed masterpiece,” by Ryan Michaels

See also the following expanded version of a link from Sunday morning, March 22:

Watchman, what of the night?

Monday, March 23, 2009

Monday March 23, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:00 PM
Logo Design

Thanks to PicoCool
    for the link to…
SmartHistory.org logo
The “art history conversation”
there is fatuous, but the site
logo (above) is an excellent
example of graphic design.

Sunday, March 22, 2009

Sunday March 22, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:00 PM
Funeral Services Held
for Natasha Richardson

E! Online today, 1 PM PDT:

“Family and friends of Natasha Richardson said their final farewells to the late actress Sunday afternoon during a small, private funeral held near her Millbrook home in upstate New York….

Richardson died on Wednesday [March 18, 2009] at the age of 45 from a head injury she suffered [on Monday, March 16, 2009] while skiing in Canada.

The funeral began after the family arrived in a police-escorted motorcade at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Lithgow, where Neeson and her sons are members….”

For what it’s worth…

Background image
for the E! story:

Eight-pointed star, background image for the E! Online logo

Related images —
Midsummer Night
in the Garden of
Good and Evil
.

See also:

God as Trauma,”
by a former vicar
of the Lithgow church,
and Drunkard’s Walk.

Sunday March 22, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:31 AM
Grace

Saturday Night Live, 'Surprise Party,' starring Kristen Wiig, April 5, 2008

wowOwow

Sunday March 22, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 AM
The Storyteller

in Chance

(continued from
last night)


Short Story:

Lotteries Saturday,
March 21, 2009:
PA midday 411 evening 332
NY midday 049 evening 913

“… we tell ourselves that
 the old-fashioned question
 ‘Who is the protagonist?’
  is a meaningless one.”

Wayne C. Booth, p. 346 in
The Rhetoric of Fiction (1961),
as quoted by Paul Wake in
The Storyteller in Chance


“I argue that Sophocles did not intend to present either Antigone or Creon as the hero/heroine for his tragic play, as Hegel, Kierkegaard, and others stipulate. Rather, Sophocles presents the Chorus and the Watchman as the true heroic figures.”

–“A Burkean Reading of the Antigone: Comical and Choral Transcendence,” by Rebecca McCarthy, Kaplan University

Ride a painted pony
let the spinning
wheel spin
.

— Quoted here
 on 4/11, 2008

Sunday March 22, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:30 AM
The Craft

“Pope tells clergy in Angola
to work against
 belief in witchcraft”

— Headline in tonight’s
online New York Times

“Do you think I am trying to weave a spell? Perhaps I am; but remember your fairy tales. Spells are used for breaking enchantments as well as for inducing them.”


— C. S. Lewis in The Weight of Glory

Related material:

Fantasy and Fugue
and the same words
as rendered by
Bach and Schweitzer

See also
Yesterday’s entries
and
Midsummer Night
in the Garden
of Good and Evil
.

Saturday, March 21, 2009

Saturday March 21, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:30 PM
Interpreter's Booth

Tonight's online New York Times:

NY Times  online March 21, 2009: Pope in Angola tells clergy to work against belief in witchcraft

Click to enlarge.


Mary Karr,
"Facing Altars:
    Poetry and Prayer"–

"There is a body
on the cross
  in my church."


Sean Penn gives Nicole Kidman his card in 'The Interpreter'

Sean Penn and Nicole Kidman
in "The Interpreter."

Click to enlarge.

"My card."

"Is Heart of Darkness the story of Kurtz or the story of Marlow’s experience of Kurtz?  Was Marlow invented as a rhetorical device for heightening the meaning of Kurtz’s moral collapse, or was Kurtz invented in order to provide Marlow with the centre of his experience in the Congo?  Again a seamless web, and we tell ourselves that the old-fashioned question 'Who is the protagonist?' is a meaningless one."


Wayne C. Booth, p. 346 in
The Rhetoric of Fiction
(1961),
as quoted by Paul Wake in
"The Storyteller in Chance"

Saturday March 21, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:25 AM

Counters in Rows

"Music, mathematics, and chess are in vital respects dynamic acts of location. Symbolic counters are arranged in significant rows. Solutions, be they of a discord, of an algebraic equation, or of a positional impasse, are achieved by a regrouping, by a sequential reordering of individual units and unit-clusters (notes, integers, rooks or pawns)."

— George Steiner
   (See March 10, "Language Game.")
 



For example:

Model of the 21-point projective plane consisting of the 1- and 2- subsets of a 6-set

Click to enlarge.

Context:

Notes on Finite Geometry
(Section on 6-set structures)
 

Friday, March 20, 2009

Friday March 20, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Happy Birthday,
Holly Hunter

Epigraph to The Glass Bead Game:

Non entia enim licet quodammodo levibusque hominibus facilius atque incuriosius verbis reddere quam entia, veruntamen pio diligentique rerum scriptori plane aliter res se habet: nihil tantum repugnat ne verbis illustretur, at nihil adeo necesse est ante hominum oculos proponere ut certas quasdam res, quas esse neque demonstrari neque probari potest, quae contra eo ipso, quod pii diligentesque viri illas quasi ut entia tractant, enti nascendique facultati paululum appropinquant.
      
       — ALBERTUS SECUNDUS
           tract. de cristall. spirit.
           ed. Clangor et Collof. lib. I, cap. 28.

In Joseph Knecht’s holograph translation:.

For although in a certain sense and for light-minded persons non-existent things can be more easily and irresponsibly represented in words than existing things, for the serious and conscientious historian it is just the reverse. Nothing is harder, yet nothing is more necessary, than to speak of certain things whose existence is neither demonstrable nor probable. The very fact that serious and conscientious men treat them as existing things brings them a step closer to existence and to the possibility of being born.

Video -- 'The  Piano,' Part 11

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Thursday March 19, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Two-Face

The Roman god Janus, from Wikipedia

[Note: Janus is Roman, not Greek, and
the photo is from one “Fubar Obfusco”]

 
The Roman god Janus, from Barry Mazur at Harvard
 Click on image for details.

From January 8:

Religion and Narrative, continued:

A Public Square

In memory of
Richard John Neuhaus,
who died today at 72:

“It seems, as one becomes older,
That the past has another pattern,
   and ceases to be a mere sequence….”

— T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets

A Walsh function and a corresponding finite-geometry hyperplane

Click on image for details.

See also The Folding.

Posted 1/8/2009 7:00 PM

Context:

Notes on Mathematics and Narrative

(entries in chronological order,
March 13 through 19)

Thursday March 19, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:00 AM
An image from
 
Quintessence:
A Glass Bead Game

 
by Charles Cameron

Christ and the four elements, 1495

Christ and the Four Elements

This 1495 image is found in
The Janus Faces of Genius:
The Role of Alchemy
in Newton's Thought
,

by B. J. T. Dobbs,
Cambridge U. Press,
2002, p. 85

From
Kernel of Eternity:

Pauli's Dream Square from 'The Innermost Kernel'

From
Sacerdotal Jargon
at Harvard
:

The Klein Four-Group: The four elements in four colors, with black points representing the identity

From "The Fifth Element"
(1997, Milla Jovovich
    and Bruce Willis) —

The crossing of the beams:

The Fifth Element, crossing of the beams

Happy birthday, Bruce Willis.
 

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Wednesday March 18, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:28 PM
From a place where
entertainment is God
:

CNN.com Entertainment, evening of March 18, 2009

Click to enlarge.

From another place:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090318-CBClogo.jpg

Click logo for a story.

“… a kind of cross.”
Gravity’s Rainbow 

Wednesday March 18, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Gallic Clarity

Yesterday’s entry Deep Structures discussed the “semiotic square,” a device that exemplifies the saying “If you can’t dazzle ’em with brilliance, then baffle ’em with bullshit.”

A search today for what the Marxist critic Fredric Jameson might have meant by saying that the square “is capable of generating at least ten conceivable positions out of a rudimentary binary opposition” leads to two documents of interest.

1. “Theory Pictures as Trails: Diagrams and the Navigation of Theoretical Narratives” (pdf), by J.R. Osborn, Department of Communication, University of California, San Diego (Cognitive Science Online, Vol.3.2, pp.15-44, 2005)

2. “The Semiotic Square” (html), by Louis Hébert (2006), professor, Université du Québec à Rimouski, in Signo (http://www.signosemio.com).

Shown below is Osborn’s picture of the semiotic square:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090318-OsbornTrails.jpg

Osborn’s discussion of the square, though more clear than, say, that of Rosalind Krauss (who reverses the bottom two parts of the square– see Deep Structures), fails. His Appendix A is miserably obscure.

On the brighter side, we have, as a sign that Gallic clarity still exists, the work of Hébert.

Here is how he approaches Jameson’s oft-quoted, but seemingly confused, remark about “ten conceivable positions”–

The Semiotic Square,”
  by Louis Hébert

1. ABSTRACT

The semiotic square, developed by Greimas and Rastier, is a means of refining oppositional analyses by increasing the number of analytical classes stemming from a given opposition from two (life/death, for instance) to four (for example, life, death, life and death (the living dead), and neither life nor death (angels)) to eight or even ten.

2. THEORY

The actantial model, isotopy and the semiotic square are undoubtedly the best-known theoretical propositions that have emerged from the Paris School of semiotics, with Greimas as its central figure. Like the actantial model and the veridictory square, the semiotic square is designed to be both a conceptual network and a visual representation of this network, usually depicted in the form of a “square” (which actually looks like a rectangle!). Courtés defines it as the visual representation of the logical structure of an opposition (cf. Courtés, 1991, 152). The semiotic square is a means of refining oppositional analyses by increasing the number of analytical classes stemming from a given opposition from two (for instance, life/death) to four (for example, life, death, life and death (the living dead), and neither life nor death (angels)) to eight or even ten. Here is an empty semiotic square.

Structure of the semiotic square

   
5. (=1+2) COMPLEX TERM
   
 
1. TERM A  
2. TERM B
 
9. (=1+4)
10. (=2+3)
 
3. TERM NOT-B  
4. TERM NOT-A
 

7. (=1+3)

POSITIVE DEIXIS

8. (=2+4) NEGATIVE DEIXIS
   
   
6. (=3+4) NEUTRAL TERM
   

LEGEND:
The + sign links the terms that are combined to make up a metaterm (a compound term); for example, 5 is the result of combining 1 and 2.

2.1 CONSTITUENT ELEMENTS

The semiotic square entails primarily the following elements (we are steering clear of the constituent relationships of the square: contrariety, contradiction, and complementarity or implication):

1. terms
2. metaterms (compound terms)
3. object(s) (classified on the square)
4. observing subject(s) (who do the classifying)
5. time (of the observation)

2.1.1 TERMS

The semiotic square is composed of four terms:

Position 1 (term A)
Position 2 (term B)
Position 3 (term not-B)
Position 4 (term not-A)

The first two terms form the opposition (the contrary relationship) that is the basis of the square, and the other two are obtained by negating each term of the opposition.

2.1.2 METATERMS

The semiotic square includes six metaterms. The metaterms are terms created from the four simple terms. Some of the metaterms have been named. (The complex term and the neutral term, despite their names, are indeed metaterms).

Position 5 (term 1 + term 2): complex term
Position 6 (term 3 + term 4): neutral term
Position 7 (term 1 + term 3): positive deixis
Position 8 (term 2 + term 4): negative deixis
Position 9 = term 1 + term 4: unnamed
Position 10 = term 2 + term 3: unnamed

These ten “positions” are apparently meant to explain Jameson’s remark.

Hébert’s treatment has considerably greater entertainment value than Osborn’s. Besides “the living dead” and angels, Hébert’s examples and exercises include vampires, transvestites, the Passion of Christ, and the following very relevant quotation:

“Simply let your ‘Yes’ be ‘Yes,’ and your ‘No,’ ‘No’; anything beyond this comes from the evil one.” (Matthew 5:37)

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Tuesday March 17, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Deep Structures

The traditional 'Square of Opposition'

The Square of Oppositon
at Stanford Encylopedia of Philosophy


The Square of Opposition diagram in its earliest known form

The Square of Opposition
in its original form

"The diagram above is from a ninth century manuscript of Apuleius' commentary on Aristotle's Perihermaneias, probably one of the oldest surviving pictures of the square."

Edward Buckner at The Logic Museum

From the webpage "Semiotics for Beginners: Paradigmatic Analysis," by Daniel Chandler:
 

The Semiotic Square of Greimas

The Semiotic Square

"The structuralist semiotician Algirdas Greimas introduced the semiotic square (which he adapted from the 'logical square' of scholastic philosophy) as a means of analysing paired concepts more fully (Greimas 1987,* xiv, 49). The semiotic square is intended to map the logical conjunctions and disjunctions relating key semantic features in a text. Fredric Jameson notes that 'the entire mechanism… is capable of generating at least ten conceivable positions out of a rudimentary binary opposition' (in Greimas 1987,* xiv). Whilst this suggests that the possibilities for signification in a semiotic system are richer than the either/or of binary logic, but that [sic] they are nevertheless subject to 'semiotic constraints' – 'deep structures' providing basic axes of signification."

* Greimas, Algirdas (1987): On Meaning: Selected Writings in Semiotic Theory (trans. Paul J Perron & Frank H Collins). London: Frances Pinter

Another version of the semiotic square:
 

Rosalind Krauss's version of the semiotic square, which she calls the Klein group

Krauss says that her figure "is, of course, a Klein Group."

Here is a more explicit figure representing the Klein group:

The Klein Four-Group, illustration by Steven H. Cullinane

There is also the logical
    diamond of opposition

The Diamond of Opposition (figure from Wikipedia)

A semiotic (as opposed to logical)
diamond has been used to illustrate
remarks by Fredric Jameson,
 a Marxist literary theorist:

"Introduction to Algirdas Greimas, Module on the Semiotic Square," by Dino Felluga at Purdue University–

The semiotic square has proven to be an influential concept not only in narrative theory but in the ideological criticism of Fredric Jameson, who uses the square as "a virtual map of conceptual closure, or better still, of the closure of ideology itself" ("Foreword"* xv). (For more on Jameson, see the [Purdue University] Jameson module on ideology.)

Greimas' schema is useful since it illustrates the full complexity of any given semantic term (seme). Greimas points out that any given seme entails its opposite or "contrary." "Life" (s1) for example is understood in relation to its contrary, "death" (s2). Rather than rest at this simple binary opposition (S), however, Greimas points out that the opposition, "life" and "death," suggests what Greimas terms a contradictory pair (-S), i.e., "not-life" (-s1) and "not-death" (-s2). We would therefore be left with the following semiotic square (Fig. 1):

A semiotic 'diamond of opposition'

As Jameson explains in the Foreword to Greimas' On Meaning, "-s1 and -s2"—which in this example are taken up by "not-death" and "not-life"—"are the simple negatives of the two dominant terms, but include far more than either: thus 'nonwhite' includes more than 'black,' 'nonmale' more than 'female'" (xiv); in our example, not-life would include more than merely death and not-death more than life.

* Jameson, Fredric. "Foreword." On Meaning: Selected Writings in Semiotic Theory. By Algirdas Greimas. Trans. Paul J. Perron and Frank H. Collins. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1976.

"The Game in the Ship cannot be approached as a job, a vocation, a career, or a recreation. To the contrary, it is Life and Death itself at work there. In the Inner Game, we call the Game Dhum Welur, the Mind of God."

The Gameplayers of Zan, by M.A. Foster

"For every kind of vampire,
there is a kind of cross."
— Thomas Pynchon,
 Gravity's Rainbow

Crosses used by semioticians
to baffle their opponents
are illustrated above.

Some other kinds of crosses,
and another kind of opponent:

Monday, July 11, 2005

Logos
for St. Benedict's Day

Click on either of the logos below for religious meditations– on the left, a Jewish meditation from the Conference of Catholic Bishops; on the right, an Aryan meditation from Stormfront.org.

Logo of Conference of Catholic Bishops     Logo of Stormfront website

Both logos represent different embodiments of the "story theory" of truth, as opposed to the "diamond theory" of truth.  Both logos claim, in their own ways, to represent the eternal Logos of the Christian religion.  I personally prefer the "diamond theory" of truth, represented by the logo below.

Illustration of the 2x2 case of the diamond theorem

See also the previous entry
(below) and the entries
  of 7/11, 2003.
 

Sunday, July 10, 2005

Mathematics
and Narrative

 
Click on the title
for a narrative about

Nikolaos K. Artemiadis

Nikolaos K. Artemiadis,
 (co-) author of

Artemiadis's 'History of Mathematics,' published by the American Mathematical Society
 

From Artemiadis's website:
1986: Elected Regular Member
of the Academy of Athens
1999: Vice President
of the Academy of Athens
2000: President
of the Academy of Athens
Seal of the American Mathematical Society with picture of Plato's Academy

"First of all, I'd like to
   thank the Academy…"

— Remark attributed to Plato

Monday, March 16, 2009

Monday March 16, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:00 PM
Damnation Morning
continued

Annals of Prose Style

  Film Review

“No offense to either of them, but ‘Georgia Rule’ suggests an Ingmar Bergman script as directed by Jerry Lewis. The subject matter is grim, the relationships are gnarled, the worldview is bleak, and, at any given moment, you suspect someone’s going to be hit with a pie.” –John Anderson at Variety.com, May 8, 2007

Sounds perfect to me.


Through a Glass Darkly

“Preserving a strict unity of time and place, this stark tale of a young woman’s decline into insanity is set in a summer home on a holiday island. It is the first part of the trilogy

Bergman's trilogy including 'Through a Glass Darkly'

that comprises Winter Light and The Silence, films which are generally seen as addressing Bergman’s increasing disillusionment with the emotional coldness of his inherited Lutheran religion. In particular here, Bergman focuses on the absence of familial love which might perhaps have pulled Karin (Andersson) back from the brink; while Karin’s mental disintegration manifests itself in the belief that God is a spider. As she slips inexorably into madness, she is observed with terrifying objectivity by her emotionally paralyzed father (Björnstrand) and seemingly helpless husband (von Sydow).”

— Nigel Floyd, Time Out, quoted at Bergmanorama

Related material:

1. The “spider” symbol of Fritz Leiber’s short story “Damnation Morning“–

Fritz Leiber's 'spider' figure

2. The Illuminati Diamond of Hollywood’s “Angels & Demons” (to open May 15), and

3. The following diagram by one “John Opsopaus“–

Elemental square by John Opsopaus from 'The Rotation of the Elements'

Monday March 16, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:00 PM
Damnation Morning
continued

Annals of Prose Style

  Film Review

“No offense to either of them, but ‘Georgia Rule’ suggests an Ingmar Bergman script as directed by Jerry Lewis. The subject matter is grim, the relationships are gnarled, the worldview is bleak, and, at any given moment, you suspect someone’s going to be hit with a pie.” –John Anderson at Variety.com, May 8, 2007

Sounds perfect to me.


Through a Glass Darkly

“Preserving a strict unity of time and place, this stark tale of a young woman’s decline into insanity is set in a summer home on a holiday island. It is the first part of the trilogy that comprises Winter Light and The Silence, films which are generally seen as addressing Bergman’s increasing disillusionment with the emotional coldness of his inherited Lutheran religion. In particular here, Bergman focuses on the absence of familial love which might perhaps have pulled Karin (Andersson) back from the brink; while Karin’s mental disintegration manifests itself in the belief that God is a spider. As she slips inexorably into madness, she is observed with terrifying objectivity by her emotionally paralyzed father (Björnstrand) and seemingly helpless husband (von Sydow).”

— Nigel Floyd, Time Out, quoted at Bergmanorama

Related material:

1. The “spider” symbol of Fritz Leiber’s short story “Damnation Morning”–

2. Hollywood’s “Angels & Demons” (to open May 15), and

3. The following diagram by one “John Opsopaus”–

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090312-OpsopausSquare.jpg

Monday March 16, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM
Plato’s Ghost

Plato’s Ghost evokes Yeats’s lament that any claim to worldly perfection inevitably is proven wrong by the philosopher’s ghost….”

— Princeton University Press on Plato’s Ghost: The Modernist Transformation of Mathematics (by Jeremy Gray, September 2008)

“She’s a brick house…”
 — Plato’s Ghost according to
     Log24, April 2007 

“First of all, I’d like
to thank the Academy.”
Remark attributed to Plato

Jerry Lewis Wins an Oscar at Last-- TIME magazine

Through a glass, darkly

Eddie Murphy and mirror image in remake of 'The Nutty Professor'

(Cf. the “I tell you a mystery”
link of March 11 in
Politics, Religion, Scarlett.”)

Monday March 16, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:45 AM
So Set ‘Em Up, Joe

(Cf. Sinatra’s birthday, 2004)

Joe Mantegna

NY Times obituaries Monday, March 16, 2009

One for his baby:

Ron Silver as Alan Dershowitz

Ron Silver as
Alan Dershowitz in
“Reversal of Fortune”
suggests the epigraph of
The Particulars of Rapture:
Reflections on Exodus

two stanzas from attorney
Wallace Stevens
quoted here yesterday afternoon.

One more for the road:

A link that appeared in a
different form in Saturday’s
Flowers for Barry“–

Speed the Plow.

This leads to
A Hanukkah Tale
containing the following:

The 16 Puzzle: transformations of a 4x4 square
This is, in turn, related to
Harvard’s Barry Mazur‘s recent
essay on time in mathematics
and literature (pdf).

L’Chaim.

Sunday, March 15, 2009

Sunday March 15, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 5:24 PM

The Origin of Change

A note on the figure
from this morning's sermon:

Diamond Theory version of 'The Square Inch Space' with yin-yang symbol for comparison

"Two things of opposite natures seem to depend
On one another, as a man depends
On a woman, day on night, the imagined

On the real. This is the origin of change.
Winter and spring, cold copulars, embrace
And forth the particulars of rapture come."

-- Wallace Stevens,
  "Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction,"
   Canto IV of "It Must Change"

Sunday March 15, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Angels, Demons,
"Symbology"

"On Monday morning, 9 March, after visiting the Mayor of Rome and the Municipal Council on the Capitoline Hill, the Holy Father spoke to the Romans who gathered in the square outside the Senatorial Palace…

'… a verse by Ovid, the great Latin poet, springs to mind. In one of his elegies he encouraged the Romans of his time with these words:

"Perfer et obdura: multo graviora tulisti."

 "Hold out and persist:
  you have got through
  far more difficult situations."

 (Tristia, Liber  V, Elegia  XI, verse 7).'"

This journal
on 9 March:

Diamond Theory version of 'The Square Inch Space' with yin-yang symbol for comparison

Note the color-interchange
symmetry
of each symbol
under 180-degree rotation.

Related material:
The Illuminati Diamond:

IMAGE- Illuminati Diamond, pp. 359-360 in 'Angels & Demons,' Simon & Schuster Pocket Books 2005, 448 pages, ISBN 0743412397

Dan Brown's novel Angels & Demons introduced in the year 2000 the fictional academic discipline of "symbology" and a fictional Harvard professor of that discipline, Robert Langdon (named after ambigram* artist John Langdon).

Fictional Harvard professor of symbology Robert Langdon, as portrayed by Tom Hanks

Tom Hanks as Robert Langdon


A possible source for Brown's term "symbology" is a 1995 web page, "The Rotation of the Elements," by one "John Opsopaus." (Cf. Art History Club.)

"The four qualities are the key to understanding the rotation of the elements and many other applications of the symbology of the four elements." –John Opsopaus

* "…ambigrams were common in symbology…." —Angels & Demons
 

Saturday, March 14, 2009

Saturday March 14, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:02 PM
Flowers for Barry

Rat in Maze, image from 'Marine Rat' at http://troops.americandaughter.org/?p=35

On Time
(in Mathematics and Literature)

“… I want to spend these twenty minutes savoring, and working up, the real complexity of the metaphorical relationship of time and distance– to defamiliarize it for us. And then I will give a few examples of how imaginative literature makes use of the inherent strangeness in this relationship:

Time ↔ Distance.

And finally I will offer my opinion (which I think must be everyone’s opinion) about why we derive significant– but not total– comfort from this equation.”

— Barry Mazur, March 8, 2009, draft (pdf) of talk for conference on comparative literature*

Another version of
Mazur’s metaphor
 Time ↔ Distance:

Equivalence of Walsh functions with hyperplanes in a finite geometry

— Steven H. Cullinane,
October 8, 2003

For some context in
comparative literature,
see Time Fold
(Oct. 10, 2003)
and A Hanukkah Tale
(Dec. 22, 2008).

Related material:
Rat Psychology
yesterday.

* American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) annual meeting, March 26-29, 2009, at Harvard. Mazur’s talk is scheduled for March 28.

Saturday March 14, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:07 AM
A Dante
for Our Times

“This could be Heaven
or this could be Hell.”
— “Hotel California”

Heaven —

Eugene Burdick, 'The Blue of Capricorn'

or —

Eugene Burdick, 'The 480'

Hell —

Eugene Burdick, 'The Ninth Wave'

Apparently from the back cover of The Ninth Wave:

“Fear + hate = power was Mike Freesmith’s formula for success.  He first tested it in high school when he seduced his English teacher and drove a harmless drunk to suicide.  He used it on the woman who paid his way through college.  He used it to put his candidate in the governor’s chair, and to make himself the most ruthless, powerful kingmaker in American politics.”

Don’t forget greed. See yesterday’s Friday the 13th entries.

Friday, March 13, 2009

Friday March 13, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:30 PM
Rat Psychology

Lawrence Summers, former president of Harvard, home of the rat psychology of Skinner and Quine, today offered a lesson in behavioral economics.

From a transcript of Summers’s remarks (for a video, see the previous entry)–

“An abundance of greed and an absence of fear on Wall Street led some to make purchases – not based on the real value of assets, but on the faith that there would be another who would pay more for those assets. At the same time, the government turned a blind eye to these practices and their potential consequences for the economy as a whole. This is how a bubble is born. And in these moments, greed begets greed. The bubble grows.

Eventually, however, this process stops – and reverses. Prices fall. People sell. Instead of an expectation of new buyers, there is an expectation of new sellers. Greed gives way to fear. And this fear begets fear.

This is the paradox at the heart of the financial crisis. In the past few years, we’ve seen too much greed and too little fear; too much spending and not enough saving; too much borrowing and not enough worrying. Today, however, our problem is exactly the opposite.

It is this transition from an excess of greed to an excess of fear that President Roosevelt had in mind when he famously observed that the only thing we had to fear was fear itself. It is this transition that has happened in the United States today.”

Related material

Spatial Practice,
Harvard-Style:

Rat in maze

Spatial Practice,
Paris-Style:

Art exhibit of empty rooms in Paris at the Centre Pompidou

Voids, a Retrospective,”
an exhibit of empty rooms
that runs through March 23
at the Centre Pompidou

See also “Art Humor
 and “Conceptual Art.”

Friday March 13, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:20 PM
Twisterooni
continued from
March 26, 2006

“When did Wharton School take over?”
— Chris Matthews tonight on “Hardball”

Good question.

Related material
from the
Harvard school:

Washington Post video of Lawrence Summers on emotion and finance

Friday March 13, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:15 PM
Radical Emptiness

Tom Conoboy on James Purdy’s novel Malcolm:

“Life, Purdy is telling us, is meaningless. Existence is absurd. It consists of events and happenings, all unavoidable, all simultaneously significant and meaningless. They touch you, wound even, ultimately kill, yet somehow existence appears to obtain in a bubble outside of the self. As Thomas M. Lorch describes it, ‘the novel portays humanity revolving about an abyss.'[1] What is real is not real, and what is not real becomes real. Malcolm describes himself as a ‘cypher’ and, in the end, his death affects no-one, least of all him.

Yet, through this, Purdy presents us with the final, and greatest, paradox. In presenting us with nothingness, and in deliberately describing the action in such bland and emotionless language, Purdy actually creates a sense of loss: there is nothing to lose, he is telling us, and yet we feel the loss greatly. What he does is to create a world of genuine nihilism, where nobody communicates, nobody connects, so that we can, in negative, imagine what a world in harmony might be like.”

[1] Thomas M. Lorch, “Purdy’s Malcolm: A Unique Vision of Radical Emptiness.” Wisconsin Studies in Contemporary Literature, Vol. 6, No. 2 (Summer, 1965), p. 212.

Today in The New York Times:


NY Times: James Purdy Has Died

See you in the
funny papers, Purdy.

Dagwood on Friday the 13th: Sadness of the echo from an empty refrigerator

Friday March 13, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM
Midnight in the Garden

From 12:00 AM on last month’s
Friday the 13th:

'Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil' and 'I Put a Spell on You'

From the soundtrack CD of
“Midnight in the Garden
  of Good and Evil”–

“Accentuate the positive.”
— Clint Eastwood 

MODE online:

Wilhelmina Slater, MODE editor-in-chief My advice for this month is to learn the lesson from the young and innocent. Embrace optimism and go forward with life, hoping only for the best…. Accentuate your positives and don’t worry about your negatives…. Because when you smile, others smile back.

Wilhelmina Slater

Thursday, March 12, 2009

Thursday March 12, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:30 PM
Aesthetics
 of Matter,

continued

Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson in 'Lost in Translation'

International

The Klein Four-Group (Click for details.)

Klein

 

Blue

Related material:

Aspects of Symmetry,
from the day that
Scarlett Johansson
turned 23, and…

"…A foyer of the spirit in a landscape
Of the mind, in which we sit
And wear humanity's bleak crown;

In which we read the critique of paradise
And say it is the work
Of a comedian, this critique…."

— "Crude Foyer," by Wallace Stevens

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Wednesday March 11, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:00 PM
Found (sort of)
in translation

The Associated Press, “Today in History” March 11– On this date…

“In 1959, the Lorraine Hansberry drama ‘A Raisin in the Sun’ opened at New York’s Ethel Barrymore Theater.”

Flashback to Feb. 28, 2008

Miles to Go…

For Scarlett:

Scarlett Johansson singing 'Yes We Can'

A campaign song
in memory of
Buddy Miles:

The California Raisins sing 'I Heard It Through the Grapevine'

Click on image for details.  

With a wink to Lois Wyse    
and a nod to Woody Allen

Listen, I tell you a mystery….

 
— and to January 23, 2009:

Le coeur a ses raisons…

Wednesday March 11, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Sein Feld
in Translation
(continued from
May 15, 1998)

The New York Times March 10–
 “Paris | A Show About Nothing“–

'Voids, a Retrospective,' at the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Photo from NY Times.

The Times describes one of the empty rooms on exhibit as…

“… Yves Klein’s ‘La spécialisation de la sensibilité à l’état matière première en sensibilité picturale stabilisée, Le Vide‘ (‘The Specialization of Sensibility in the Raw Material State Into Stabilized Pictorial Sensibility, the Void’)”

This is a mistranslation. See “An Aesthetics of Matter” (pdf), by Kiyohiko Kitamura and Tomoyuki Kitamura, pp. 85-101 in International Yearbook of Aesthetics, Volume 6, 2002

“The exhibition «La spécialisation de la sensibilité à l’état matière-première en sensibilité picturale stabilisée», better known as «Le Vide» (The Void) was held at the Gallery Iris Clert in Paris from April 28th till May 5th, 1955.” –p. 94

“… «Sensibility in the state of prime matter»… filled the emptiness.” –p. 95

Kitamura and Kitamura translate matière première correctly as “prime matter” (the prima materia of the scholastic philosophers) rather than “raw material.” (The phrase in French can mean either.)

Related material:
The Diamond Archetype and
The Illuminati Diamond.

The link above to
prima materia
is to an 1876 review
by Cardinal Manning of
a work on philosophy
by T. P. Kirkman, whose
“schoolgirls problem” is
closely related to the
finite space of the
 diamond theorem.

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Tuesday March 10, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:11 PM

Immortal Diamond
continued:

“That flower unseen, that gem of purest ray,
Bright thoughts uncut by men:
Strange that you need but speak them, Thomas Gray,
And the mind skips and dives beyond its ken,

Finding at once the wild supposed bloom,
Or in the imagined cave
Some pulse of crystal staving off the gloom
As covertly as phosphorus in a grave.”

— From “In a Churchyard,” by Richard Wilbur

“A metaphysical assertion of this kind is the idea of the ‘diamond body,’ the indestructible breath-body which develops in the Golden Flower, or in the square inch space.”

The Secret of the Golden Flower, by Richard Wilhelm, Carl Gustav Jung, and Hua-Yang Liu, second rev. ed., publ. by Routledge, 1999, pp. 130-131

For more about these concepts, see the work cited.

See also
Diamond, Flower, Space.

Tuesday March 10, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:26 AM
Language Game

“Music, mathematics, and chess are in vital respects dynamic acts of location. Symbolic counters are arranged in significant rows. Solutions, be they of a discord, of an algebraic equation, or of a positional impasse, are achieved by a regrouping, by a sequential reordering of individual units and unit-clusters (notes, integers, rooks or pawns). The child-master, like his adult counterpart, is able to visualize in an instantaneous yet preternaturally confident way how the thing should look several moves hence. He sees the logical, the necessary harmonic and melodic argument as it arises out of an initial key relation or the preliminary fragments of a theme. He knows the order, the appropriate dimension, of the sum or geometric figure before he has performed the intervening steps. He announces mate in six because the victorious end position, the maximally efficient configuration of his pieces on the board, lies somehow ‘out there’ in graphic, inexplicably clear sight of his mind….”

“… in some autistic enchantment, pure as one of Bach’s inverted canons or Euler’s formula for polyhedra.”

— George Steiner, “A Death of Kings,” in The New Yorker, issue dated Sept. 7, 1968

Related material:

“Classrooms are filled with discussions not of the Bible and Jesus but of 10 ‘core values’– perseverance and curiosity, for instance– that are woven into the curriculum.”

— “Secular Education, Catholic Values,” by Javier C. Hernandez, The New York Times, Sunday, March 8, 2009

“… There was a problem laid out on the board, a six-mover. I couldn’t solve it, like a lot of my problems. I reached down and moved a knight…. I looked down at the chessboard. The move with the knight was wrong. I put it back where I had moved it from. Knights had no meaning in this game. It wasn’t a game for knights.”


— Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep

The Chandler quotation appears in “Language Game,” an entry in this journal on April 7, 2008.

Some say the “Language Game” date, April 7, is the true date (fixed, permanent) of the Crucifixion– by analogy, Eliot’s “still point” and Jung’s “centre.” (See yesterday, noon.)

Monday, March 9, 2009

Monday March 9, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:24 PM
First and Last Things

Next Sunday’s New York Times Book Review arrived in today’s mail. On the inside of the first page is a full-page ad for a course of 24 lectures on DVD’s called “Games People Play: Game Theory in Life, Business, and Beyond.” On the inside of the last page is “Our Steiner Problem– and Mine,” a full-page essay by Lee Siegel on polymath George Steiner.

Related material:

Happy birthday to the late Bobby Fischer.

“For God’s sake, let us sit upon the ground
 And tell sad stories of the death of kings”
Richard II, Act III, Scene ii 
Portrayal of John Nash sitting upon the ground
Russell Crowe as game theorist
John Nash in “A Beautiful Mind”

Monday March 9, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Humorism

'The Manchurian Candidate' campaign button

"Always with a
little humor."
Dr. Yen Lo  

Diamond diagram of the four humors, the four qualities, the four elements, the four seasons, and four colors

From Temperament: A Brief Survey

For other interpretations
of the above shape, see
The Illuminati Diamond.

from Jung's Aion:

"From the circle and quaternity motif is derived the symbol of the geometrically formed crystal and the wonder-working stone. From here analogy formation leads on to the city, castle, church, house, room, and vessel. Another variant is the wheel. The former motif emphasizes the ego’s containment in the greater dimension of the self; the latter emphasizes the rotation which also appears as a ritual circumambulation. Psychologically, it denotes concentration on and preoccupation with a centre…." –Jung, Collected Works, Vol. 9, Part II, paragraph 352

As for rotation, see the ambigrams in Dan Brown's Angels & Demons (to appear as a film May 15) and the following figures:

Diamond Theory version of 'The Square Inch Space' with yin-yang symbol for comparison
 
Click on image
for a related puzzle.
For a solution, see
 The Diamond Theorem.

A related note on
"Angels & Demons"
director Ron Howard:

Director Ron Howard with illustration of the fictional discipline 'symbology'
 
Click image for details.

Sunday, March 8, 2009

Sunday March 8, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:07 PM

Transit Authority

In memory of
Stanley Kubrick
(overlooked in
yesterday's memorial)

"For believers the day of death, and even more the day of martyrdom, is not the end of all; rather, it is the 'transit' towards immortal life. It is the day of definitive birth, in Latin, dies natalis.

Bowman's end in '2001'

"'Wherever you come near
the human race, there's layers
and layers of nonsense,'
says the Stage Manager in
Thornton Wilder's 'Our Town.'"

Today's sermon
    from Frank Rich

The Eye in the Pyramid

The Seventh Symbol from 'Stargate'

The monolith at the beginning of '2001'

For more layers, see
James A. Michener's
The Source.

Saturday, March 7, 2009

Saturday March 7, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM
One or Two Ideas

Today’s birthday: Piet Mondrian

From James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man:

The dean returned to the hearth and began to stroke his chin.

–When may we expect to have something from you on the esthetic question? he asked.

–From me! said Stephen in astonishment. I stumble on an idea once a fortnight if I am lucky.

–These questions are very profound, Mr Dedalus, said the dean. It is like looking down from the cliffs of Moher into the depths. Many go down into the depths and never come up. Only the trained diver can go down into those depths and explore them and come to the surface again.

–If you mean speculation, sir, said Stephen, I also am sure that there is no such thing as free thinking inasmuch as all thinking must be bound by its own laws.

–Ha!

–For my purpose I can work on at present by the light of one or two ideas of Aristotle and Aquinas.

–I see. I quite see your point.

Besides being Mondrian’s birthday, today is also the dies natalis (in the birth-into-heaven sense) of St. Thomas Aquinas and, for those who believe worthy pre-Christians also enter heaven, possibly of Aristotle.

Pope Benedict XVI explained the dies natalis concept on Dec. 26, 2006:

“For believers the day of death, and even more the day of martyrdom, is not the end of all; rather, it is the ‘transit’ towards immortal life. It is the day of definitive birth, in Latin, dies natalis.

The Pope’s remarks on that date
were in St. Peter’s Square.

From this journal on that date,
a different square —


The Seventh Symbol:

Box symbol

Pictorial version
of Hexagram 20,
Contemplation (View)

The square may be regarded as
symbolizing art itself.
(See Nov.30 – Dec.1, 2008.)

In honor of
Aristotle and Aquinas,
here is a new web site,
illuminati-diamond.com,
with versions of the diamond shape
made famous by Mondrian

Cover of  Mondrian: The Diamond Compositions

— a shape symbolizing
possibility within modal logic
 as well as the potentiality of
 Aristotle’s prima materia.

Friday, March 6, 2009

Friday March 6, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:30 PM
The Illuminati Stone

TV listing for this evening —
Family Channel, 7:30 PM:

"Harry Potter and
  the Sorcerer's Stone"

In other entertainment news —
Scheduled to open May 15:

IMAGE- Illuminati Diamond, pp. 359-360 in 'Angels & Demons,' Simon & Schuster Pocket Books 2005, 448 pages, ISBN 0743412397

"Only gradually did I discover
what the mandala really is:
'Formation, Transformation,
Eternal Mind's eternal recreation'"
(Faust, Part Two)

Carl Gustav Jung  

Related material:

"For just about half a century, E.J. Holmyard's concisely-titled Alchemy has served as a literate, well-informed, and charming introduction to the history and literature of Western alchemy." —Ian Myles Slater

From 'Alchemy,' by Holmyard, the diamond of Aristotle's 4 elements and 4 qualities

For more about this
"prime matter" (prima materia)
see The Diamond Archetype

The Diamond Cross

and Holy the Firm.

 

Background:

Holmyard —

'Alchemy,' by Holmyard, back cover of Dover edition

— and Aristotle's
On Generation and Corruption.

Thursday, March 5, 2009

Thursday March 5, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:20 PM

Here’s hoping this president knows how to read the newspaper.

Thursday March 5, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:20 PM
De Angelis*

Horton Foote Remembered
 
* continued from yesterday

Wednesday, March 4, 2009

Wednesday March 4, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:07 PM
Cover Art

Cover of 'Angels & Demons,' paperback ISBN-10 0671027360

As religious fictions go,
I prefer…

De Angelis

“Richardson leaned forward and picked up from the table a very old bound book and a very fat exercise book. He again settled himself in his chair, and said, looking firmly at Anthony– ‘This is the De Angelis of Marcellus Victorinus of Bologna, published in the year 1514 at Paris, and dedicated to Leo X.’

‘Is it?’ Anthony said uncertainly.”

— Charles Williams, The Place of the Lion, 1931

Cover by Jim Lamb for 'The Place of the Lion,' Eerdmans 1979 paperback, ISBN-10 0802812228

For more about the artist,
see an entry at the weblog
“Through the Wardrobe”
on Aug. 18, 2008.

Related material:
 previous entry.

Wednesday March 4, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:24 PM
The Straight Story

Horton Foote Has Died-- NY Times March 4, 2009

Stanley Fish in
Sunday’s New York Times
on “Redemption,”
by George Herbert:

“… the final line provides an answer with a compact swiftness that is literally breathtaking: ‘Who straight, “Your suit is granted,” said, and died.’ (‘Straight’ here means ‘immediately and without detour’ and describes the movement and pace of the line it introduces.)”

“Selah.”
— Dr. Hunter S. Thompson

“I’m a rolling stone from Texas”
— Theme song in  
“Secondhand Lions”
(starring Robert Duvall, 2003)

Foote was not associated with
“Secondhand Lions” (which I
saw for the first time last night)
 but has worked many times
with Duvall.

Wednesday March 4, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Markoff Process

“So fearsome was Dr. Schwartz’s early reputation as a mathematician that when John Forbes Nash Jr., the Nobel Prize winning mathematician and economist, learned that he was attempting to solve an extremely challenging mathematical problem…. he became agitated, apparently fearing Dr. Schwartz might beat him to a solution, said Sylvia Nasar, author of ‘A Beautiful Mind,’ a biography of Nash.”

New York Times obituary of Jacob T. Schwartz dated Tuesday, March 3, 2009

 Author of the obituary:
John Markoff.

New York Lottery
March 3, 2009:

NY Lottery March 3, 2009-- Midday 491, Evening 116

“His background in mathematical algorithms led Dr. Schwartz to develop an early programming language…. The language would later influence the designer of the Python programming language, widely used by programmers today.” —NY Times

“Treatment of Autistic Schizophrenic Children with LSD-25 and UML-491“–

“Autistic schizophrenic children present challenging and baffling problems in treatment…. Many of the children have been followed subsequently into later childhood, adolescence, and adulthood…. Meanwhile, a new group of young autistic children are always available for new treatment endeavors as the new modes become available.”*

Monty Python - Bright Side of Life

Dr. Schwartz died on Monday,
birthday of Tom Wolfe —
who wrote
The Painted Word.

1/16: “It’s all there, hiding behind the realistic side.” –Andrew Wyeth

Related material: The previous five entries.

* by Lauretta Bender, M.D., Lothar Goldschmidt, M.D., and D.V. Siva Sankar, Ph.D., in Recent Advances in Biological Psychiatry, 1962, 4, 170-177
.

Tuesday, March 3, 2009

Tuesday March 3, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:32 AM
Straight

“For every kind of vampire,
there is a kind of cross.”

— Thomas Pynchon in  
Gravity’s Rainbow

This entry is continued
from yesterday evening,
from midnight last night,
and from an entry of
 February 20 (the date
four years ago of
 Hunter Thompson’s death)–
  “Emblematizing the Modern“–

Emblematizing the Modern

Note that in applications, the vertical axis of the Cross of Descartes often symbolizes the timeless (money, temperature, etc.) while the horizontal axis often symbolizes time.

T.S. Eliot:


“Men’s curiosity searches past and future
And clings to that dimension. But to apprehend
The point of intersection of the timeless
With time, is an occupation for the saint….”

“I played ‘Deathmaster’ straight….
 The best villains are the ones who are
 both protagonist and antagonist.”
The late Robert Quarry

“Selah.”
The late Hunter Thompson

'Deathmaster' Robert Quarry and gonzo journalist Hunter Thompson, who both died on a February 20

Yesterday afternoon’s online
New York Times:

NY Times online front page, 5 PM March 2, 2009-- graph of stock market plunge

Today’s online New York Times:

Footnote

Descending financial graph's arrow strikes man's pants cuff, immobilizing him

Tuesday March 3, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM
Midnight
in the Garden

continues

Poster for Robert Quarry's 'The Deathmaster'

Click poster for details.

Robert Quarry obituary, LA Times of March 2, 2009

Click image for details.

Related material:

The three entries here on
 the date of Quarry’s death:

Emblematizing the Modern,

A Kind of Cross, and

The Cross of Constantine.

Monday, March 2, 2009

Monday March 2, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:00 PM
Straight

From this journal’s Sunday sermon:

“Flowers’s thoughts stray to Brown,
 with affectionate pity, as he
drinks port and eats walnuts
for the first time in
Senior Combination Room.”

— G. H. Hardy recounting the plot
of A Fellow of Trinity

A Glossary of Cambridge:

Combination Room
Attached to the High Table end of the largely unheated medieval college halls, this was a warm place for Fellows to gather before and after meals. Now known as the Senior Combination Room to distinguish it from the Junior and Middle combination rooms.

From Stanley Fish’s weblog
 in The New York Times
 (Sunday, March 1, 2009, 10 PM):

George Herbert’s “Redemption” —

“‘I resolved to be bold,/And make a suit unto him, to afford/A new small-rented lease and cancel th’old.’

But first he has to find him…. Either he’s just left or he hasn’t been seen, but then, unexpectedly and in the most unlikely circumstances, he turns up:

‘At length I heard a ragged noise and mirth/Of thieves and murderers: there I him espied.’

Before he or his reader can ask ‘what on earth are you doing here?,’ the final line provides an answer with a compact swiftness that is literally breathtaking:

 ‘Who straight, “Your suit is granted,” said, and died.'”

For Senior Combination Room as
a den of thieves and murderers,
see That Hideous Strength.

Related material:

The Painted Word

G. H. Hardy died at 70
 on December 1, 1947.
That date is now observed as
“Day Without Art.”

Day Without Art logo: X'd-out frame

Click on image
for further details.

Monday March 2, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:30 AM
Joyce's Nightmare
continues

Today in History – March 2

Today is Monday, March 2, the 61st day of 2009. There are 304 days left in the year.

Today's Highlight in History:

On March 2, 1939, Roman Catholic Cardinal Eugenio Pacelli was elected Pope on his 63rd birthday; he took the name Pius XII.

IMAGE- Illuminati Diamond, pp. 359-360 in 'Angels & Demons,' Simon & Schuster Pocket Books 2005, 448 pages, ISBN 0743412397

 

Log24 on June 9, 2008

From Gravity's Rainbow (Penguin Classics, 1995), page 563:

"He brings out the mandala he found.
'What's it mean?'
[….]

Slothrop gives him the mandala. He hopes it will work like the mantra that Enzian told him once, mba-kayere (I am passed over), mba-kayere… a spell […]. A mezuzah. Safe passage through a bad night…."

 

In lieu of Slothrop's mandala, here is another…

Christ and the four elements, 1495
 

Christ and the Four Elements

This 1495 image is found in
The Janus Faces of Genius:
The Role of Alchemy
in Newton's Thought,
by B. J. T. Dobbs,
Cambridge University Press,
2002, p. 85


Related mandalas:Diamond arrangement of the four elements
and

Logo by Steven H. Cullinane for website on finite geometry

For further details,
click on any of the
three mandalas above.

 

Angels and Demons cross within a diamond (page 306), and Finite Geometry logo

Happy birthday to
Tom Wolfe, author of
The Painted Word.
 

Sunday, March 1, 2009

Sunday March 1, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Solomon's Cube
continued

"There is a book… called A Fellow of Trinity, one of series dealing with what is supposed to be Cambridge college life…. There are two heroes, a primary hero called Flowers, who is almost wholly good, and a secondary hero, a much weaker vessel, called Brown. Flowers and Brown find many dangers in university life, but the worst is a gambling saloon in Chesterton run by the Misses Bellenden, two fascinating but extremely wicked young ladies. Flowers survives all these troubles, is Second Wrangler and Senior Classic, and succeeds automatically to a Fellowship (as I suppose he would have done then). Brown succumbs, ruins his parents, takes to drink, is saved from delirium tremens during a thunderstorm only by the prayers of the Junior Dean, has much difficulty in obtaining even an Ordinary Degree, and ultimately becomes a missionary. The friendship is not shattered by these unhappy events, and Flowers's thoughts stray to Brown, with affectionate pity, as he drinks port and eats walnuts for the first time in Senior Combination Room."

— G. H. Hardy, A Mathematician's Apology

"The Solomon Key is the working title of an unreleased novel in progress by American author Dan Brown. The Solomon Key will be the third book involving the character of the Harvard professor Robert Langdon, of which the first two were Angels & Demons (2000) and The Da Vinci Code (2003)." —Wikipedia

"One has O+(6) ≅ S8, the symmetric group of order 8! …."

 — "Siegel Modular Forms and Finite Symplectic Groups," by Francesco Dalla Piazza and Bert van Geemen, May 5, 2008, preprint.

"The complete projective group of collineations and dualities of the [projective] 3-space is shown to be of order [in modern notation] 8! …. To every transformation of the 3-space there corresponds a transformation of the [projective] 5-space. In the 5-space, there are determined 8 sets of 7 points each, 'heptads' …."

— George M. Conwell, "The 3-space PG(3, 2) and Its Group," The Annals of Mathematics, Second Series, Vol. 11, No. 2 (Jan., 1910), pp. 60-76

"It must be remarked that these 8 heptads are the key to an elegant proof…."

— Philippe Cara, "RWPRI Geometries for the Alternating Group A8," in Finite Geometries: Proceedings of the Fourth Isle of Thorns Conference (July 16-21, 2000), Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001, ed. Aart Blokhuis, James W. P. Hirschfeld, Dieter Jungnickel, and Joseph A. Thas, pp. 61-97
 

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