Log24

Sunday, October 18, 2015

Ballet Blanc

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:09 AM

For more about the coordinatization problem
of the previous post, see Ballet Blanc .

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Publish or …

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM
 

From The New York Times  online on July 29 —

" Ms. Appelbaum’s favorite authors, she said in an interview with The Internet Writing Journal in 1998, were too many to count, but they included George Eliot, Anthony Trollope, Anne Tyler and Julian Barnes.

'I love to see writers expand our range of understanding, experience, knowledge, even happiness,' she said in that interview. 'Publishing has always struck me as a way to change the world.' "

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page B6 of the New York edition with the headline: Judith Appelbaum, Guru On Publishing, Dies at 78.

See a review of the new Anne Tyler novel Clock Dance
in today's  online New York Times .

For a more abstract dance, see Ballet Blanc .

"A blank underlies the trials of device." — Wallace Stevens

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Space Art

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:45 PM

Related material —

See too Ballet Blanc  and Expanding the Spiel.

A non -Paris review

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Stage

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:27 AM

See Ballet Blanc 
and Still Point.

Friday, December 9, 2016

Snow Dance

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

See Ballet Blanc  in this journal.

For a darker perspective, click on the image below.

IMAGE- Detail of large 'Search for the Lost Tesseract' image with Amy Adams, Richard Zanuck, 'snowflake' structure, and white gloves

See also Cartier in The Hexagon of Opposition.

Happy birthday to Kirk Douglas.

Kirk Douglas in 'Diamonds'

Sunday, November 29, 2015

There the Dance Is

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 10:00 PM

In memory of ballet designer
Yolanda Sonnabend, who
reportedly died at 80 on Nov. 9,
see posts on Apollo, Ballet Blanc,
maps of New Haven, etc., etc., etc.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Entertainment Theory

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

From "Entertainment," a 1981 story by M. A. Foster—

"For some time, Cormen had enjoyed a peculiar suspicion, which he had learned from his wanderings around the city, and cultivated with a little notebook, in which he had made a detailed series of notes and jottings, as well as crude, but effective, charts and maps of certain districts. 'Cormen's Problem,' as it was known, was familiar to the members of the circle in which he moved; in fact, if he had not been so effective with his productions and so engaging in his personality, they might have considered him a bore.

It seemed, so the suspicion went, that the city was slowly shrinking, as evidenced by abandoned districts along the city edges. Beyond the empty houses were ruins, and beyond that, traces of foundations and street lines. Moreover, it had recently dawned on him that there were no roads out of the city, although there were no restraints. One hardly noticed this—it was the norm. But like many an easy assumption, once broken it became increasingly obvious.

Cormen's acquaintances were tolerant of his aberration, but generally unsympathetic. What he needed was proof, something he could demonstrate in black and white—and color if required. But the city was reluctant, so it appeared, to give up its realities so easily. The Master Entertainment Center, MEC, would not answer direct queries about this, even though it would obediently show him presentations, pictorial or symbolic as he required, of the areas in question. But it was tiresome detail work, in which he had to proceed completely on his own."

Lily Collins in City of Bones  (2013)—

American Folk Art (see August 23, 2011) —

IMAGE- Four Winds quilt block

Art Theory —

IMAGE- The eight Galois quaternions

See as well Ballet Blanc .

Saturday, February 9, 2013

Snow Dance

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:09 PM

The Snow White dance from last Nov. 14
features an ad that was originally embedded
in an American Mathematical Society Notices
review describing three books of vulgarized
mathematics. These books all use "great
equations" as a framing device.

This literary strategy leads to a more abstract
snow dance. See the ballet blanc  in this journal
on Balanchine's birthday (old style) in 2003.
That dance involves equation (C) below.

Recall that in a unit ring ,
"0" denotes the additive identity,
"1" the multiplicative identity, and "-1" the
additive inverse of the multiplicative identity.

Three classic equations:

(A)  1 + 1 = 2    (Characteristic 0, ordinary arithmetic)

(B)  1 + 1 = 0   (Characteristic 2 arithmetic, in which 2 = 0)

(C)  1 + 1 = -1 (Characteristic 3 arithmetic, in which 2 = -1)

Cases (B) and (C), in which the characteristic is prime,
occur in Galois geometry.

For a more elaborate snow dance, see Master Class.

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Four Winds

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:07 AM

A Quilt Version

IMAGE- Four Winds quilt block

A Mathematical Version

IMAGE- The eight Galois quaternions

Related remarks —

For the eight-limbed star at the top of the quaternion array above,
see "Damnation Morning" in this journal—

She drew from her handbag a pale grey gleaming implement
that looked by quick turns to me like a knife, a gun, a slim
sceptre, and a delicate branding iron—especially when its
tip sprouted an eight-limbed star of silver wire.

“The test?” I faltered, staring at the thing.

“Yes, to determine whether you can live in the fourth
dimension or only die in it.”

— Fritz Leiber, short story, 1959

See also Feb. 19, 2011.

Sunday, January 9, 2011

Back to You, Olivia

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 PM

After the Diablo Ballet, the Ballet Blanc .

Friday, January 9, 2009

Friday January 9, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 5:01 PM
Stories
for Mary Karr

"In reality, my prose books
probably sit between
I Was a Teenage Sex Slave
and some other contemporary
memoir written in five minutes…."

Mary Karr in the NY Times
of July 6, 2007

Story of M, Story of N, Story of O

See also
Ballet Blanc
and the true story
0, 1, 2, 3, ….

"In a dream scenario, my memoirs…
would find another shelf.
They’d sit between St. Augustine
  and Nabokov’s Speak, Memory…."

— Mary Karr, loc. cit.

Recall the
mnemonic rhyme
"Nine is a Vine."

Thursday, January 9, 2003

Thursday January 9, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:48 PM

Balanchine's Birthday

Today seems an appropriate day to celebrate Apollo and the nine Muses.

From a website on Balanchine's and Stravinsky's ballet, "Apollon Musagete":

In his Poetics of Music (1942) Stravinsky says: "Summing up: What is important for the lucid ordering of the work– for its crystallization– is that all the Dionysian elements which set the imagination of the artist in motion and make the life-sap rise must be properly subjugated before they intoxicate us, and must finally be made to submit to the law: Apollo demands it."  Stravinsky conceived Apollo as a ballet blanc a "white ballet" with classical choreography and monochromatic attire. Envisioning the work in his mind's eye, he found that "the absence of many-colored hues and of all superfluities produced a wonderful freshness." Upon first hearing Apollo, Diaghilev found it "music somehow not of this world, but from somewhere else above." The ballet closes with an Apotheosis in which Apollo leads the Muses towards Parnassus. Here, the gravely beautiful music with which the work began is truly recapitulated "on high"– ceaselessly recycled, frozen in time.

— Joseph Horowitz

 

 

Another website invoking Apollo:

The icon that I use… is the nine-fold square…. The nine-fold square has centre, periphery, axes and diagonals.  But all are present only in their bare essentials.  It is also a sequence of eight triads.  Four pass through the centre and four do not.  This is the garden of Apollo, the field of Reason…. 

In accordance with these remarks, here is the underlying structure for a ballet blanc:

A version of 'grid3x3.gif.'

This structure may seem too simple to support movements of interest, but consider the following (click to enlarge):

As Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, paraphrasing Horace, remarks in his Whitsun, 1939, preface to the new edition of the Oxford Book of English Verse, "tamen usque recurret Apollo."

The alert reader will note that in the above diagrams, only eight of the positions move.

Which muse remains at the center?

Consider the remark of T. S. Eliot, "At the still point, there the dance is," and the fact that on the day Eliot turned 60, Olivia Newton-John was born.  How, indeed, in the words of another "sixty-year-old smiling public man," can we know the dancer from the dance?
 

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