Log24

Friday, November 26, 2004

Friday November 26, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:11 PM

Dinner Theater?

“Philosophers ponder the idea of identity: what it is to give something a name on Monday and have it respond to that name on Friday….”
— Bernard Holland in the New York Times of Monday, May 20, 1996

From an entry of last Monday,
“Lynchburg Law” — 

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Critic Frank Rich in Wednesday’s Times on a recent televised promotion:

“… it was a manufactured scandal, as over-the-top as a dinner theater production of ‘The Crucible.’ “

From a Friday, Nov. 19, entry:

“the Platonist… is more interested in deriving an abstraction of the object into a universal….”

— Radu Surdulescu, Form, Structure, and Structurality

From El Universal online today:

“Meanwhile, [Mexico] continued to deal with the savagery of Tuesday night’s televised lynchings, with some saying the media had exploited the occurrence.

‘This is a new and worrisome phenomenon,’ security analyst José Reveles said in an interview… ‘It’s like the evil offspring of all the violent exploitation in the media.’  ‘It was Fuenteovejuna,’ he said, referring to the work by the Spanish golden age playwright Lope de Vega in which an entire town covers up the slaying of a corrupt official.”

Frank Rich has the last word:

“A ‘moral values’ crusade that stands between a TV show this popular and its audience will quickly learn the limits of its power in a country where entertainment is god.”

Wednesday, November 24, 2004

Wednesday November 24, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:00 AM

Habeas Corpus

From St. Nicholas Versus the Volcano:

“The day begins with Yvonne’s arrival at the Bella Vista bar in Quauhnahuac. From outside she hears Geoffrey’s familiar voice shouting a drunken lecture, this time on the topic of the rule of the Mexican railway that requires that  ‘A corpse will be transported by express!’ (Lowry, Under the Volcano).”

In honor of a particular corpse, from last Friday, November 19, here is part of a Log24 entry from that day:

“The meaning of the poem is ‘the full organized body of all the extension and intension that we can find in it.’ “
— Allen Tate

A corpse will be transported by express!

The corpse in question is that of a children’s book illustrator.  The following screenshot from today’s online New York Times illustrates both extension and, in light of the Lowry quotation above, intension.

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Monday, November 22, 2004

Monday November 22, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:00 PM

Lynchburg Law

From today’s New York Times:

The Rev. Jerry Falwell’s Liberty University [at Lynchburg, Virginia] is part of a movement around the nation that brings a religious perspective to the law.

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Sam Dean for The New York Times

The connection between the Bible and the law is part of the curriculum at Liberty, one of a number of new religiously oriented law schools.

Go to Article

The Times’s photo (above) of books on the Bible and the law, apparently at Lynchburg, suggests a related book that may be of considerable value to the legal scholars there:

Charles Williams on the
Salem witchcraft trials:

“The afflicted children continued to testify; there entered into the cases what was called ‘spectral evidence,’ a declaration by the witness that he or she could see that else invisible shape before them, perhaps hurting them.  It was a very ancient tendency of witnesses, and it had occurred at a number of trials in Europe.”

Witchcraft, Meridian Books, Inc., New York,
1959 (first published 1941), page 281

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Monday November 22, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:12 PM
 
Flores, Flores Para Los Muertos

See entry of
All Hallows' Eve:

"A memorial Mass will be held on Monday,
November 22, 2004, at the Church of
St. Ignatius Loyola, 980 Park Avenue…."

Photo by Gerry Gantt

From Four Quartets:

And the pool was filled
with water out of sunlight,
And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
The surface glittered out of heart of light…

Related reading:

From a review at Amazon.com
of All Hallows' Eve, by Charles Williams:

"How many other books do you know in which one of the two main characters is dead, in which the dead and living can communicate almost as easily as we do every day, in which magic is serious and scary? Mainstream books, that is, not Goosebumps, with an introduction by T.S. Eliot, with the whole thing to be understood as at least feasible if not truth. This is unusual. And yet, and yet, the whole thing works."

Sunday, November 21, 2004

Sunday November 21, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 PM

Pictures at 11

From today's Maureen Dowd column:

"Trapped in their blue bell jar,
drowning in unfulfilled dreams,
Democrats are the
'Desperate Housewives' of politics."

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Sam Dean for
The New York Times

Law and Religion

The Rev. Jerry Falwell's Liberty University is part of a movement around the nation that brings a religious perspective to the law.
Go to Article

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Click on picture
for details.

Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird:

"She's… broken a rigid and time-honored code of our society, a code so severe that whoever breaks it is hounded from our midst as unfit to live with.

2004 Country Music Awards

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"Every performance was a gem,
including 'Mockingbird'…
sung by Toby Keith with his
17-year-old daughter Krystal."

Michelle Snow

Sunday November 21, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

A Burning Cross
for Ireland

Friday's entries included a cross-burning in honor of the late Protestant activist Bobby Frank Cherry and of a 1963 bombing in Birmingham, Alabama:
 

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Click on picture for details.

The following honors today's 30th anniversary of other bombings, apparently by Catholics, in another Birmingham in England.
 
" 'Caritas' is a Latin word which means love, charity and compassion. The international symbol of Caritas is a flaming cross, symbolising Christ’s burning love for his people."

— Catholic Lay Organisations of Darwin, Australia

For Gerry Adams and
all the Catholics of Ireland,
 here's a hunka hunka
burnin' love:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041121-Cross.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Click on picture for details.
 

Sunday November 21, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 PM

Trinity and Counterpoint

Today's Roman Catholic meditation is from Gerry Adams, leader of Sinn Fein, the political arm of the Irish Republican Army:

"I certainly regret what happened and I make no bones about that," Adams said on the 30th anniversary of pub bombings that killed 21 on Nov. 21, 1974, in Birmingham, England.

Those who care what Roman Catholics think of the Trinity may read the remarks of St. Bonaventure at math16.com.

That site also offers a less holy but more intelligible trinity based on the irrefutable fact that 3 x 8 = 24 and on a remarkable counterpoint between group actions on a 4×2 array and group actions on a 4×4 array.

For a Protestant view of this trinity, see a website at the University of Birmingham in England.

That site's home page links to Birmingham's City Evangelical Church.
 

Sunday November 21, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Today's Sermon:
Canonization

The title of Cleanth Brooks's classic The Well Wrought Urn comes from a poem by John Donne:

We’ll build in sonnets pretty roomes;
As well a well wrought urne becomes
The greatest ashes, as half-acre tombes.

The Canonization

"A poem cannot exhaust reality, but it can arrest it: by manifesting a vision of experience available in no other way. This is only possible because, like a physical urn, it is a distinct substantial object: only by its difference from human experience can a poem represent that experience, even as the urn can be a metaphor for a poem only if it is not itself a poem. The alternative to 'crystalline closure' is not, then, an endless and chaotic 'repetition and proliferation,' but a structured relationship of significance."

The Old New Criticism and Its Critics, by R. V. Young, Professor of English at North Carolina State University

Related reading: At War with the Word, by R. V. Young.

Canon:

"A musical composition in which the voices begin one after another, at regular intervals, successively taking up the same subject. It either winds up with a coda (tailpiece), or, as each voice finishes, commences anew, thus forming a perpetual fugue or round." — Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary

Canonization:

The process of making a musical theme into a canon:

"The phrase continues almost uninterrupted and unvaried until the canonization of the theme…."

Program Notes for
   Greater Dallas Youth Orchestras,
   Sunday May 18, 2003, by Erin Lin
   on Symphony No. 3 in C Minor, Op. 78,
   by Camille Saint-Saëns

 

For more on this concept, see the Log24.net entries of July 16-31, 2004, and in particular the entries of July 25.

See, too, Theme and Variations, with its midi of Bach's

Fourteen Canons on the First Eight Notes of the Goldberg Ground.
 

Saturday, November 20, 2004

Saturday November 20, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:00 AM
Janet's Tea Party

From October 5, 2004:
 

For Janet Leigh,
who died on Sunday, Oct. 3, 2004:
 

The Manchurian Candidate

MARCO — What's your last name?

ROSIE — Chaney.  I'm production assistant for a man named Justin who had two hits last season.  I live on 54th Street, a few doors from the Modern Museum of Art, of which I'm a "tea privileges" member,  no cream.  I live at 53 West 54th Street, apartment 3B.  Can you remember that?

MARCO —  Yes.

On the redesigned
Museum of Modern Art,
11 West 53rd Street:

"… the ultimate judgment will have to wait: Taniguchi himself told a MoMA curator who'd complimented him that considering the building without the art in it is like admiring the tea cup without the green tea. Next month the museum will have art on the walls and crowds in the galleries—and then the tea ceremony will begin."

— Cathleen McGuigan, Newsweek,
    issue dated Oct. 11, 2004

 

The art of Theo van Doesburg suggests
the following "tea party" mini-exhibit:

 

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From
the book
Tangram

 

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The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041120-Tea2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
From the book Tangram

Friday, November 19, 2004

Friday November 19, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:00 PM

From Tate to Plato

In honor of Allen Tate‘s birthday (today)
and of the MoMA re-opening (tomorrow)

“For Allen Tate the concept of tension was the most useful formal tool at the critic’s disposal, as irony and paradox were for Brooks. The principle of tension sustains the whole structure of meaning, and, as Tate declares in Tension in Poetry (1938), he derives it from lopping the prefixes off the logical terms extension and intension (which define the abstract and denotative aspect of the poetic language and, respectively, the concrete and connotative one). The meaning of the poem is ‘the full organized body of all the extension and intension that we can find in it.’  There is an infinite line between extreme extension and extreme intension and the readers select the meaning at the point they wish along that line, according to their personal drives, interests or approaches. Thus the Platonist will tend to stay near the extension end, for he is more interested in deriving an abstraction of the object into a universal….”

— from Form, Structure, and Structurality,
   by Radu Surdulescu

“Eliot, in a conception comparable to Wallace Stevens’ ‘Anecdote of the Jar,’ has suggested how art conquers time:

        Only by the form, the pattern,
Can words or music reach
The stillness, as a Chinese jar still
Moves perpetually in its stillness.”

F. O. Matthiessen
   in The Achievement of T.S. Eliot,
   Oxford University Press, 1958

From Writing Chinese Characters:

“It is practical to think of a character centered within an imaginary square grid…. The grid can… be… subdivided, usually to 9 or 16 squares….”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041119-ZhongGuo.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

These “Chinese jars”
(as opposed to their contents)
are as follows:

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Various previous Log24.net entries have
dealt with the 3×3 “form” or “pattern”
(to use the terms of T. S. Eliot).

For the 4×4 form, see Poetry’s Bones
and Geometry of the 4×4 Square.

Friday November 19, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:30 AM

Goin’ to Carolina
in My Mind

From today’s New York Times:

“Bobby Frank Cherry, the former Klansman whose conviction two years ago for the church bombing that killed four black girls in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963 resolved one of the most shocking cases of the civil rights era, died yesterday at the Kilby Correctional Facility near Montgomery, Ala., a prison spokesman said. He was 74.”

From

The Footprints of God

(Log24.net, July 31, 2004):

“If Trinity is everything you say it is,” she said, “then why in God’s name would it be based in North Carolina?”

This I hadn’t expected.  “Aren’t you the top Jungian analyst in the world?”

“Well… one of them.”

“Why are you based in North Carolina?”

From

The Fiery Cross —
A Call to Arms
:

“The western portions of Virginia and the Carolinas, the northern portions of Georgia and Alabama, and most of Tennessee, were settled by the hardy race of Scotch-Irish, in whose veins the Scotch blood was warm.”

From the LA Times story
cited in yesterday’s entry:

“Born in Charlotte, N.C., Graham grew up in a family of Scottish Presbyterians…. Since 1950,  [he has] lived in an Appalachian log home… near Asheville, N.C.”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041119-Graham72.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041119-MethFlag.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Graham
in 1972
Methodist
Flag

 

“The Cross and Flame is a registered trademark and the use is supervised by the General Council on Finance and Administration of The United Methodist Church. Permission to use the Cross and Flame must be obtained from the General Council on Finance and Administration of The United Methodist Church – Legal Department, 1200 Davis Street, Evanston, IL 60201.”  — www.bobmay.info

Today’s birthday:
Poet Allen Tate

“In the riven troughs the splayed leaves
Pile up, of nature the casual sacrament
To the seasonal eternity of death.”

Ode to the Confederate Dead

Thursday, November 18, 2004

Thursday November 18, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 6:20 PM

Last Crusade?

From the Los Angeles Times:

Evangelist Billy Graham is scheduled to preach a four-day Crusade at the Pasadena Rose Bowl, beginning tonight.

I do not agree with Graham’s beliefs, but respect his sincerity.

As for the “moral values” that have caused such political confusion recently, some  Crusaders and I might agree on the importance of the following book:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041118-Abolition.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Click on picture for details.

Tuesday, November 16, 2004

Tuesday November 16, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:12 PM

Geometry, continued

Added a long footnote on symplectic properties of the 4×4 array to “Geometry of the 4×4 Square.”

Friday, November 12, 2004

Friday November 12, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:56 AM

Dark Zen

The above link is in memory of
Iris Chang,
who ended her life at 36
on Nov. 9, 2004.

A central concept of Zen
is satori, or “awakening.”
For a rude awakening, see
Satori at Pearl Harbor.

Fade to Black

See, too, my entries of
Aug. 1-7, 2003,
from which the following is taken:

“…that ineffable constellation of talents that makes the player of rank: a gift for conceiving abstract schematic possibilities; a sense of mathematical poetry in the light of which the infinite chaos of probability and permutation is crystallized under the pressure of intense concentration into geometric blossoms; the ruthless focus of force on the subtlest weakness of an opponent.”

— Trevanian, Shibumi

” ‘Haven’t there been splendidly elegant colors in Japan since ancient times?’

‘Even black has various subtle shades,’ Sosuke nodded.’ “

— Yasunari Kawabata, The Old Capital

An Ad Reinhardt painting
described in the entry of
noon, November 9, 2004 —
the date given
as that of Chang’s death —
is illustrated below.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041112-Reinhardt.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Ad Reinhardt,
Abstract Painting,
1960–66.
Oil on canvas, 60 x 60 inches.
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

Thursday, November 11, 2004

Thursday November 11, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:04 PM

Blasphemy?

From the profile of
psifenix at livejournal.com:

"Perhaps I shall embrace Islam.
Its standards for poetry
seem very high."

— Susan Voight in the novel
Freedom & Necessity,
by Emma Bull and Steven Brust

From psifenix
at livejournal.com
on Oct. 3, 2004:

"S4 is the one true God,
and C2×C2 is
His [normal] prophet."

psifenix

"Group theory is so beautiful. If I ever get the chance to go back in time or mess with an agrarian civilization, I'm going to try to get them to worship finite groups of small order. Why? Symmetry is nice, and you can turn groups into pretty pictures, too… Each group could represent an attribute of god, and the nonabelian attributes would be the scary and wrathful ones. The prime cyclic groups could symbolize the cycles of life and death. And the trivial group would be the origin of all things!

I'm on crack, but that's okay!"

psifenix

 

"You can turn groups
   into pretty pictures" —

IMAGE- 'Study of O' and 'Portrait of O' (the octahedral group)

Shown above are two ways of
picturing the octahedral group O,
also known as
the symmetric group S4.

For further details, see
Diamond Theory.

Thursday November 11, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:11 AM

11/11 11:11:11

Samuel Beckett on Dante and Joyce:

“Another point of comparison is the preoccupation with the significance of numbers. The death of Beatrice inspired nothing less than a highly complicated poem dealing with the importance of the number 3 in her life. Dante never ceased to be obsessed by this number. Thus the poem is divided into three Cantiche, each composed of 33 Canti…. Why, Mr. Joyce seems to say, should…. the Armistice be celebrated at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month? He cannot tell you because he is not God Almighty, but in a thousand years he will tell you… He is conscious that things with a common numerical characteristic tend towards a very significant interrelationship. This preoccupation is freely translated in his present work….”

— “Dante… Bruno. Vico.. Joyce,” in James Joyce/Finnegans Wake: A Symposium (1929), New Directions paperback, 1972

See also my entry from five years ago on this date:

Plato, Pegasus, and the Evening Star.

Wednesday, November 10, 2004

Wednesday November 10, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:25 AM

Updike on God

“In Exodus 3:14, when Moses asks God his name, the answer in Hebrew, ’Ehyeh-’Asher-’Ehyeh, has been commonly rendered I AM THAT I AM but could be, Alter reports, simply I AM, I AM.  An impression grew upon me, as I made my way through these obdurate old texts, that to the ancient Hebrews God was simply a word for what was: a universe often beautiful and gracious but also implacable and unfathomable.”

— John Updike, review of Robert Alter’s translation of The Five Books of Moses, in The New Yorker, issue dated Nov. 1, 2004, posted online Oct. 25, 2004

Tuesday, November 9, 2004

Tuesday November 9, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The Nine
(Readings for
Weyl’s birthday)

“The grid is a staircase to the Universal….
We could think about Ad Reinhardt, who,
despite his repeated insistence that
‘Art is art,’
ended up by painting a series of…
nine-square grids in which the motif
that inescapably emerges is
a Greek cross.


Greek Cross

There is no painter in the West
who can be unaware of
the symbolic power
of the cruciform shape and the
Pandora’s box of spiritual reference
that is opened once one uses it.”

— Rosalind Krauss,
Meyer Schapiro Professor
of Modern Art and Theory
at Columbia University

(Ph.D., Harvard U., 1969),
in “Grids”

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Krauss

“Nine is a very powerful Nordic number.”
— Katherine Neville, author of The Eight,

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041109-Magic.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

in The Magic Circle,
Ballantine paperback,
1999, p. 339

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Neville

“To live is to defend a form.”

(“Leben, das heisst eine Form verteidigen“)
attributed to Hölderlin

For details on the above picture,
which deals with properties of the
nine-square grid, see

Translation Plane.

For more on the defense
of this form,


see the Log24.net entry of
June 5, 2004, A Form,
and the Art Wars entries
for St. Peter’s Day, 2004.

Monday, November 8, 2004

Monday November 8, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:11 AM
Ship of State

“The president would say that
he relied on his ‘gut’ or his “instinct”
to guide the ship of state,
and then he ‘prayed over it.’ “

Ron Suskind in
The New York Times Magazine
,
Sunday, Oct. 17, 2004

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041108-Clark.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Commander
Gard J. Clark

Clark is the commanding officer
of the USS Dallas (see previous entry).

He is a native of Jamestown, New York,
and a 1981 graduate of
Frewsburg Central School
and Jamestown Community College.
He is a 1985 graduate of the
United States Naval Academy.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041108-Church.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Kiantone Congregational Church

Sunday, November 7, 2004

Sunday November 7, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:55 PM
Big Fish

In honor of the reversion of Leningrad
to its former name, St. Petersburg,
and in honor of the late Howard Keel,
who died this morning:

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The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041107-Dallas2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

SSN 700, The USS Dallas:

“USS Dallas is the 13th Los Angeles class
nuclear powered attack submarine.
The boat plays a very prominent part
in Tom Clancy’s Hunt for Red October.”

Sunday November 7, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:55 AM

In memory of
“an ardent anti-Communist,”
Harry Fleischman,
dead at 90 on
All Saints’ Day:

The Hunt for
Red November

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From USA Today

On November 1917:

Lenin may have controlled Petrograd,
[but] Russia was a vast country
and he did not control vast areas.
These areas were openly hostile
to the Bolsheviks.”

Friday, November 5, 2004

Friday November 5, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

A Harvard Education
in a Sentence

Harvard alumnus Norman Mailer:

At times, bullshit can only be countered with superior bullshit.

For Harvard bullshit, see
The Crimson Passion.

For superior bullshit, see
Shrine of the Holy Whapping.

Friday November 5, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 AM
New Journalism 101:
The Rhetorical Question

Art critic Holland Cotter in today’s New York Times on the work of a contemporary artist:

“Although much of this art is intuitive in origin, an on-the-spot response to materials, little of it can be described as whimsical. Some of it is uninnocently weird: several of the dozens of small, labor-intensive pieces seem to be invaded by a creeping mold, or stained with organic substances, including blood.

Indeed, like Mozart’s opera, the work as a whole eludes conventional categories. Is ‘The Magic Flute’ a musical comedy, a redemptive pageant or a moral tract? Is it darling or dark? Is Mr. Tuttle doing drawing, collage, painting or sculpture? Process Art or Conceptual Art? Or something else? Are the results art about art, or art about everything, including art?”

Who gives a rat’s ass?

Tuesday, November 2, 2004

Tuesday November 2, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 6:00 AM
Readings for
All Souls’ Day

Yesterday was the Feast of All Saints. Today is the Feast of All Souls.

Those of us who are not saints may profit from the writings of both the saintly Thomas Wolfe and the more secular Tom Wolfe.

From Log24.net on the Feast of St. Ignatius Loyola, a quotation from St. Thomas Wolfe:



Nell

“Remembering speechlessly we seek the great forgotten language, the lost lane-end into heaven, a stone, a leaf, an unfound door. Where? When?”

Thomas Wolfe

See also a Wolfe quotation from the Feast of St. Gerard Manley Hopkins in 2003

For the Feast of St. Thomas Wolfe himself, see the Log24 entries of Sept. 15 (the date of Wolfe’s death).

Readings more suited to today, All Souls’ Day, than to yesterday, All Saints’:

Bright Young Things,
Andrew at St. Andrews,
and, of course,
Under the Volcano.

Andrew at St. Andrews recommends the remarks, in The Guardian, of Tom Wolfe on today’s election.

The fact that the protagonist of Tom Wolfe’s new novel is a virgin from the hill country of North Carolina, combined with the above entry on Nell from the Feast of St. Ignatius, brings us back to the earlier Wolfe…  For the later, secular Wolfe on the earlier, saintly Wolfe, see

Look Homeward, Wolfe.

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