Log24

Monday, April 23, 2018

Super Symmetry Surfing

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:17 AM

Midrash —

    

Backstory — Search this journal for Taormina.

Friday, March 24, 2017

A Large Superset

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:06 PM

From a post of Feb. 24

From a search for "Preparation" in this journal (see previous post) —

"It is almost inevitable to compare this book to Borevich-Shafarevich
Number Theory . The latter is a fantastic book which covers a large
superset of the material in Cohn's book. Borevich-Shafarevich is,
however, a much more demanding read and it is out of print.
For gentle self-study (and perhaps as a preparation to later read
Borevich-Shafarevich), Cohn's book is a fine read."

"I meant a larger map." — Number Six in "The Prisoner" (1967)

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Super Overarching Symmetry

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:48 PM

(Continued)

Santa Fe Institute logo (see previous post) —

Symmetry , by Hermann Weyl

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060319-Weyl.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Completing the Supersquare

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 AM

Presbyterian elder Reubin Askew was called “Jesus Christ Supersquare
after completing his first year as governor of Florida—

IMAGE- Reubin Askew was called 'Jesus Christ Supersquare' after completing his first year as governor of Florida.

Now Askew has completed his life.

See also other instances of “Super” in this journal.

Update of 10:30 AM March 13 —

For those who like puzzles, here is yet another
instance of “Super,” this one related to the pattern
in last evening’s post Obiter Dictum —

IMAGE- Rubik 'Supercube' with nine triangular half-squares on each face

Saturday, March 19, 2011

Night of the Supermoon

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:02 PM

Readings for tonight, the Night of the Supermoon

  1. Configuration
  2. Moonrise over Pyramid
  3. July 2005

Monday, November 4, 2019

Trudeau Revisited

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:24 PM

Previously in Log24:  Trudeau and the Story Theory  of Truth.

More-recent remarks by Trudeau —

Bible Stories for Skeptics

Review
With a bit of a twinkle in his eye, Richard Trudeau—a skeptic, retired Unitarian Universalist minister, Harvard Divinity School grad and (though he doesn't use the word) humanist—removes the supernaturalism from some of the common stories in the Judeo-Christian Bible for the edification of non-scholars. He links them to history as known to archeologists and serious historians and tries to salvage some things of value in the collection of diverse materials in the book…. 
— Edd Doerr, book reviewer for The Unitarian Universalist Humanist Association

About the Author
Richard Trudeau is minister emeritus of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Weymouth, Massachusetts. He holds a Master of Divinity degree with concentration in biblical studies from Harvard Divinity School. He is also professor emeritus of Stonehill College in Easton, Massachusetts, where he specialized in the history of mathematics, the philosophy of science and the history of astronomy. His previous books include Universalism 101 and The Non-Euclidean Revolution.

Product details
File Size: 474 KB
Print Length: 166 pages
Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1493688642
Publisher: Chad Brown Publishing (July 6, 2014)

Log24 on the above publication date — July 6, 2014 —

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

The Wertham Memorandum

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:38 AM

For Harlan Kane

From this  journal on Feb. 5, 2009:

"In the garden of Adding
live Even and Odd
And the song of love's recision
is the music of the spheres."

— The Midrash Jazz Quartet in 
City of God , by E. L. Doctorow (2000).

From this  journal on the date of
the above post by Gavaler:

Sunday, July 14, 2019

Old Pathways in Science:

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:37 PM

The Quantum Tesseract Theorem Revisited

From page 274 — 

"The secret  is that the super-mathematician expresses by the anticommutation
of  his operators the property which the geometer conceives as  perpendicularity
of displacements.  That is why on p. 269 we singled out a pentad of anticommuting
operators, foreseeing that they would have an immediate application in describing
the property of perpendicular directions without using the traditional picture of space.
They express the property of perpendicularity without the picture of perpendicularity.

Thus far we have touched only the fringe of the structure of our set of sixteen E-operators.
Only by entering deeply into the theory of electrons could I show the whole structure
coming into evidence."

A related illustration, from posts tagged Dirac and Geometry —

Anticommuting Dirac matrices as spreads of projective lines

Compare and contrast Eddington's use of the word "perpendicular"
with a later use of the word by Saniga and Planat.

American Pie Continues.

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:34 AM

From Pi Day 2017

"Don't want to end up a cartoon in a cartoon graveyard."
 

“God’s plan for man in this world is Adam and Eve,
not Adam and Steve.”

— The late William E. Dannemeyer, who reportedly
died at 89 on July 9, 2019.

Hollywood offers a second opinion —

"Zoolander 2" film script

— The garden of Eden.
The birthplace
of Adam and Eve
and Steve.
— Steve? Who's Steve?
— Steve is
the original supermodel.
The first of the purebloods.

Sunday, May 26, 2019

Sunday Shul: Connecting the Dots

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

"It's very easy to say, 'Well, Jeff couldn't quite connect these dots,'"
director Jeff Nichols told BuzzFeed News. "Well, I wasn't actually
looking at the dots you were looking at."

— Posted on March 21, 2016, at 1:11 p.m,
Adam B. Vary, BuzzFeed News Reporter

"Magical arrays of numbers have been the talismans of mathematicians and mystics since the time of Pythagoras in the sixth century B.C. And in the 16th century, Rabbi Isaac ben Solomon Luria devised a cosmological world view that seems to have prefigured superstring theory, at least superficially. Rabbi Luria was a sage of the Jewish cabalist movement — a school of mystics that drew inspiration from the arcane oral tradition of the Torah.

According to Rabbi Luria's cosmology, the soul and inner life of the hidden God were expressed by 10 primordial numbers [sic ], known as the sefirot. [Link added.]"

— "Things Are Stranger Than We Can Imagine,"
by Malcolm W. BrowneNew York Times Book Review ,
Sunday, March 20, 1994

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Review

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:44 PM

A later article about this same William Boyd

"In the end, it’s this indifference on the part of the tastemakers
that makes Boyd’s project a worthy one, pointing as it does to
their ability to treat as real whatever they choose, and to deny
the reality of other things simply by redirecting their gaze." 

Also on November 14, 2011 —

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Secret Characters

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , , — m759 @ 2:23 PM

"Cell 461" quote from Curzio Malaparte superimposed on a scene from
the 1963 Godard film "Le Mépris " ("Contempt") —

"The architecture… beomes closely linked to the script…."

Malaparte's cell number , 461, is somewhat less closely  linked
to the phrase "eternal blazon" —

Irving was quoted here on Dec. 22, 2008

The Tale of
the Eternal Blazon

by Washington Irving

Blazon  meant originally a shield , and then
the heraldic bearings on a shield .
Later it was applied to the art of describing
or depicting heraldic bearings in the proper
manner; and finally the term came to signify 
ostentatious display  and also description or
record by words or other means 
. In Hamlet ,
Act I Sc. 5, the Ghost, while talking with
Prince Hamlet, says:

‘But this eternal blazon must not be
To ears of flesh and blood.’

Eternal blazon  signifies revelation or description
of things pertaining to eternity 
.”

— Irving’s Sketch Book , p. 461
 

Update of 6:25 PM ET —

"Self-Blazon of Edenic Plenitude"

(The Issuu text is taken from Speaking about Godard , by Kaja Silverman
and Harun Farocki, New York University Press, 1998, page 34.)

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Architectural Note

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 PM

Casa Malaparte, also known as Villa Malaparte —

Related film image with architectural quotation superimposed

'Sincerity, order, logic and clarity above all' — Italian rationalist architecture philosophy.

Related art prose —

Sunday, December 30, 2018

Also Sprach Aitchison

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:48 PM

The New Yorker  reviewing "Bumblebee"

"There is one reliable source for superhero sublimity,
and it’s all the more surprising that it’s a franchise with
no sacred inspiration whatsoever but, rather, of purely
and unabashedly mercantile origins: the 'Transformers'
series, based on a set of toys, in which Michael Bay’s
exhilarating filmmaking offers phantasmagorical textures
of an uncanny unconscious resonance."

— Richard Brody on December 29, 2018

"Before time began, there was the Cube."

— Optimus Prime

Iain Aitchison on symmetric generation of M24

Some backstory — A Riddle for Davos,  Jan. 22, 2014.

Saturday, December 29, 2018

Annals of Style: Perfecting the New Yorker Sneer

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:38 PM

See also the Verwandlungslehre  link from the previous post
and The Hassenfeld Legacy (for Harlan Kane).

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

CV

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:01 PM

The title abbreviates* that of a collection of Wittgenstein's remarks:

Ludwig Wittgenstein — Culture and Value 
Revised Edition, Wiley-Blackwell (1998)

Showing 20 results for spirit

page 18, rubble & finally a heap of ashes; but spirits will hover over the ashes. MS 107 229:

page 18, Page 5 Only something supernatural can expre

page 20, contemplating it from above in its†c flight.†

page 21, spirit in which it is written.†f This spirit is, I believe, different from that of t

page 21, and American civilization. The spirit of this civilization the expression of

page 21, day†h fascism & socialism, is a spirit that is alien & uncongenial†i to the au

page 21, he Page Break 9 can work in the spirit of the whole, and his strength can with

page 21, straight for what is concrete. Which is chara

page 22, danger in a long foreword is that the spirit of a book has to be evident in the book

page 22, It is all one to me whether the typical weste

page 23, a great temptation to want to make the spirit explicit. MS 109 204: 6-7.11.1930 Page

page 23, readers that will be clear just from the fact

page 28, Foggy day. Grey autumn haunts us. Laughter se

page 42, If one wanted to characterize the essence of

page 51, attention from what matters.) The Spirit puts what is essential, essential for y

page 51, how far all this is exactly in the spirit of Kierkegaard.) MS 119 151: 22.10.1937

page 51, something feminine about this outlook?) MS 11

page 100, comfortable, clearer expression, but cannot b

page 106, act otherwise."–Perhaps, though, one might s

page 210, Page 7 †b function Page 7 †c from its Page

****************************************************************

The above "spirit guide" was suggested by yesterday's post
on Knuth as Yoda and by the paper in today's previous post, 
"Shadowhunter Tales."

This  post's title, "CV," is from . . .

Monday, December 17, 2018

Tales from Story Space

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:45 PM

"Kiernan Brennan Shipka  (born November 10, 1999)
is an American actress. She is best known for starring as 
Sabrina Spellman on the Netflix supernatural horror series 
Chilling Adventures of Sabrina  (2018–present)." — Wikipedia

As noted here earlier, Shipka turned 18 on Nov. 10 last year.

From Log24 on that date

Another 18th birthday in Story Space

Saturday, October 13, 2018

Space 101

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:01 PM

Screenshot of a tweet by space writer Shannon Stirone
posted at 10:57 PM ET October 12 —

See also NASA + Wiig.

Stirone has an opinion piece in today's online New York Times  promoting NASA.

Discussing the Hubble Space Telescope, she claims that . . .

"Hubble peers deep into space, patiently collecting the universe’s traveling light,
then delivering it to us in never before seen images: galaxies, supernovas and
nebulae. It is a time machine. And without it we wouldn’t know we are inside
a galaxy that is just one of possibly trillions."

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Godard and Interality

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:14 AM

The previous post, "One Plus One," suggests some further
art-historical remarks on interality

From Third Text , 2013, Vol. 27, No. 6, pp. 774–785 —

"Genealogy of the Image in Histoire(s) du Cinéma : Godard, Warburg and the Iconology of the Interstice"

By Dimitrios S. Latsis

* * * * P. 775

My discussion will focus on the significance of the concept of the ‘space in-between,’ its importance for Godard’s work and its role in a relational historiography of images more broadly. I hope to corroborate how Godard functions as a twenty-first century archaeologist of the moving image, constructing a meta-cinematic collage that, while consisting of an indexing of (almost exclusively) pre-existing filmic samples, ends up becoming a hybrid work of art in its own right. Godard, in the final analysis, expands the Warburgian programme of iconology into that of a cinematographic iconology of the interstice.

* * * * P. 777

Godard conceives of the image only in the plural, in the intermediate space between two images, be it a prolonged one (in  Histoire(s)  there are frequent instances of black screens) or a non-existent one (superimposition, co-presence of two images on screen). He comments: ‘[For me] it’s always two, begin by showing two images rather than one, that’s what I call image, the one made up of two’ [18] and elsewhere, ‘I perceived . . . cinema is that which is between things, not things [themselves] but between one and another.’ [19]

18. Jean-Luc Godard and Youssef Ishaghpour, "Archéologie du cinéma et mémoire du siècle," Farrago ,Tours, 2000, p. 27. The title of this work is reflective of the Godardian agenda that permeates Histoire(s) .

19. Jean-Luc Godard, "Introduction à une véritable histoire du cinéma," Albatros , Paris,1980, p. 145

* * * * P. 783 —

If it is in ‘the in-between’ that thought is born, then for Godard cinematography as ‘a form that thinks  . . . was born with the advent of modern painting.’ [62]

62. Godard and Ishaghpour, op. cit., pp 45–46.

* * * * P. 785

Warburg commented on the signification of the black spaces that he placed between images in his analysis of the network of intervals in  Mnemosyne , by quoting Johann Wolfgang Goethe’s dictum ‘the truth inhabits the middle space.’ [68] This citation induces a feeling of déjà-vu for the viewer of Histoire(s). The link was not missed by Warburg himself, as one of his diary entries testifies: ‘We can compare this phenomenon [the iconology of the interval] to that of the cinematic montage, the domain of the interpretation is an intervallic one.’  [69]

68. Warburg,  Mnemosyne , pp 135–146.

69. Warburg is quoted in Didi-Huberman, L’image survivante, p. 503. (Georges Didi-Huberman, L’image survivante. Histoire de l’art et temps des fantômes selon Aby Warburg , Minuit, Paris, 2002)

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Deep Learning for Jews

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:23 PM

From The New York Times  on June 20, 2018 —

" In a widely read article published early this year on arXiv.org,
a site for scientific papers, Gary Marcus, a professor at
New York University, posed the question:

'Is deep learning approaching a wall?'

He wrote, 'As is so often the case, the patterns extracted
by deep learning are more superficial than they initially appear.' "

See as well an image from posts tagged Quantum Suffering  . . .

The time above, 10:06:48 PM July 16, is when  I saw

"What you mean 'we,' Milbank?"

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Cut

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 PM

"All our words from loose using
have lost their edge."
 — Ernest Hemingway    

"Cut! That was mint!"

— Line from "Super 8" (2011)

Related material — posts tagged Blacklist Thread.

The Bell

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:11 PM

Three hidden keys open three secret gates
Wherein the errant will be tested for worthy traits
And those with the skill to survive these straits
Will reach The End where the prize awaits

— Ready Player One , by Ernest Cline

"Look, my favorite expression is,
'When you go up to the bell, ring it,
or don’t go up to the bell.'
We’ve gone too far. We have to ring the bell."

Mel Brooks on "The Producers"
     in The New York Times  today.

A 2016 Scribner edition of Stephen King's IT —

Related material —

Mystery box  merchandise from the 2011  J. J. Abrams film  Super 8 

Saturday, July 7, 2018

Easter Eggs for Rosalind

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:19 PM

Three hidden keys open three secret gates
Wherein the errant will be tested for worthy traits
And those with the skill to survive these straits
Will reach The End where the prize awaits

Ready Player One , by Ernest Cline

Related text —

Tu es Petrus et super hanc petram
aedificabo ecclesiam meam et tibi
dabo claves regni caelorum
 

Mt. 16:18

Related imagery —

From Steven Spielberg's film "Ready Player One" (2018) —

From this journal on June 17, 2003

From The New York Times  on Easter night, 2007 —

Death of Sol LeWitt

See as well Rosalind Krauss on LeWitt:

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Taken In

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:36 AM

A passage that may or may not have influenced Madeleine L'Engle's
writings about the tesseract :

From Mere Christianity , by C. S. Lewis (1952) —

"Book IV – Beyond Personality:
or First Steps in the Doctrine of the Trinity"
. . . .

I warned you that Theology is practical. The whole purpose for which we exist is to be thus taken into the life of God. Wrong ideas about what that life is, will make it harder. And now, for a few minutes, I must ask you to follow rather carefully.

You know that in space you can move in three ways—to left or right, backwards or forwards, up or down. Every direction is either one of these three or a compromise between them. They are called the three Dimensions. Now notice this. If you are using only one dimension, you could draw only a straight line. If you are using two, you could draw a figure: say, a square. And a square is made up of four straight lines. Now a step further. If you have three dimensions, you can then build what we call a solid body, say, a cube—a thing like a dice or a lump of sugar. And a cube is made up of six squares.

Do you see the point? A world of one dimension would be a straight line. In a two-dimensional world, you still get straight lines, but many lines make one figure. In a three-dimensional world, you still get figures but many figures make one solid body. In other words, as you advance to more real and more complicated levels, you do not leave behind you the things you found on the simpler levels: you still have them, but combined in new ways—in ways you could not imagine if you knew only the simpler levels.

Now the Christian account of God involves just the same principle. The human level is a simple and rather empty level. On the human level one person is one being, and any two persons are two separate beings—just as, in two dimensions (say on a flat sheet of paper) one square is one figure, and any two squares are two separate figures. On the Divine level you still find personalities; but up there you find them combined in new ways which we, who do not live on that level, cannot imagine.

In God's dimension, so to speak, you find a being who is three Persons while remaining one Being, just as a cube is six squares while remaining one cube. Of course we cannot fully conceive a Being like that: just as, if we were so made that we perceived only two dimensions in space we could never properly imagine a cube. But we can get a sort of faint notion of it. And when we do, we are then, for the first time in our lives, getting some positive idea, however faint, of something super-personal—something more than a person. It is something we could never have guessed, and yet, once we have been told, one almost feels one ought to have been able to guess it because it fits in so well with all the things we know already.

You may ask, "If we cannot imagine a three-personal Being, what is the good of talking about Him?" Well, there isn't any good talking about Him. The thing that matters is being actually drawn into that three-personal life, and that may begin any time —tonight, if you like.

. . . .

But beware of being drawn into the personal life of the Happy Family .

https://www.jstor.org/stable/24966339

"The colorful story of this undertaking begins with a bang."

And ends with

Martin Gardner on Galois

"Galois was a thoroughly obnoxious nerd,
 suffering from what today would be called
 a 'personality disorder.'  His anger was
 paranoid and unremitting."

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Dirac and Geometry (continued)

"Just fancy a scale model of Being 
made out of string and cardboard."

Nanavira Thera, 1 October 1957,
on a model of Kummer's Quartic Surface
mentioned by Eddington

"… a treatise on Kummer's quartic surface."

The "super-mathematician" Eddington did not see fit to mention
the title or the author of the treatise he discussed.

See Hudson + Kummer in this  journal.

See also posts tagged Dirac and Geometry.

Monday, June 11, 2018

Arty Fact

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 10:35 PM

The title was suggested by the name "ARTI" of an artificial
intelligence in the new film 2036: Origin Unknown.

The Eye of ARTI —

See also a post of May 19, "Uh-Oh" —

— and a post of June 6, "Geometry for Goyim" — 

Mystery box  merchandise from the 2011  J. J. Abrams film  Super 8 

An arty fact I prefer, suggested by the triangular computer-eye forms above —

IMAGE- Hyperplanes (square and triangular) in PG(3,2), and coordinates for AG(4,2)

This is from the July 29, 2012, post The Galois Tesseract.

See as well . . .

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Geometry for Goyim

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:45 PM

Mystery box  merchandise from the 2011  J. J. Abrams film  Super 8  —

A mystery box that I prefer —

Box containing Froebel's Third Gift-- The Eightfold Cube

Click image for some background.

See also Nicht Spielerei .

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Illustrators of the Word

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:30 AM

Tom Wolfe in The Painted Word  (1975) 

“I am willing (now that so much has been revealed!)
to predict that in the year 2000, when the Metropolitan
or the Museum of Modern Art puts on the great
retrospective exhibition of American Art 1945-75,
the three artists who will be featured, the three seminal
figures of the era, will be not Pollock, de Kooning, and
Johns-but Greenberg, Rosenberg, and Steinberg.
Up on the walls will be huge copy blocks, eight and a half
by eleven feet each, presenting the protean passages of
the period … a little ‘fuliginous flatness’ here … a little
‘action painting’ there … and some of that ‘all great art
is about art’ just beyond. Beside them will be small
reproductions of the work of leading illustrators of
the Word from that period….”

The above group of 322,560 permutations appears also in a 2011 book —

From 'Beautiful Mathematics,' by Martin Erickson, an excerpt on the Cullinane diamond theorem (with source not mentioned)

— and in 2013-2015 papers by Anne Taormina and Katrin Wendland:

Monday, April 2, 2018

Three Mother Cubes

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:44 PM

From a Toronto Star video pictured here on April 1 three years ago:

The three connected cubes are labeled "Harmonic Analysis," 'Number Theory,"
and "Geometry."

Related cultural commentary from a review of the recent film "Justice League" —

"Now all they need is to resurrect Superman (Henry Cavill),
stop Steppenwolf from reuniting his three Mother Cubes
(sure, whatever) and wrap things up in under two cinematic
hours (God bless)."

The nineteenth-century German mathematician Felix Christian Klein
as Steppenwolf —

Volume I of a treatise by Klein is subtitled
"Arithmetic, Algebra, Analysis." This covers
two of the above three Toronto Star cubes.

Klein's Volume II is subtitled "Geometry."

An excerpt from that volume —

Further cultural commentary:  "Glitch" in this journal.

Saturday, March 24, 2018

Sure, Whatever.

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:13 AM

The search for Langlands in the previous post
yields the following Toronto Star  illustration —

From a review of the recent film "Justice League" —

"Now all they need is to resurrect Superman (Henry Cavill),
stop Steppenwolf from reuniting his three Mother Cubes
(sure, whatever) and wrap things up in under two cinematic
hours (God bless)."

For other cubic adventures, see yesterday's post on A Piece of Justice 
and the block patterns in posts tagged Design Cube.

Friday, March 2, 2018

A Snowflake on the Iceberg

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 AM

A scholium on the previous post, "Mother Ship Meets Mother Church" —

"Consider Saint Hedwig of Silesia (1174–1243), for example,
who is elegantly depicted in this catalogue, striking a pose
with her prayer book, rosary, and Virgin and child statue
(a reminder of the legitimacy of her sex), along with boots
slung over her elbow so she could walk barefoot like
the apostles. Between miracles, she was also known to 
supervise con­struction of new convents. Hedwig is but
a snowflake on the iceberg  of the extra­ordinary role of
actual women in the Middle Ages, to which more evidence
is added continually thanks the Feminae database."

— From "Wonder Women," by Matthew J. Milliner

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Raiders of the Lost Images

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:28 AM

On the recent film "Justice League" —

From DC Extended Universe Wiki, "Mother Box" —

"However, during World War I, the British rediscovered
mankind's lost Mother Box. They conducted numerous studies
but were unable to date it due to its age. The Box was then
shelved in an archive, up until the night Superman died,
where it was then sent to Doctor Silas Stone, who
recognized it as a perpetual energy matrix. . . ." [Link added.]

The cube shape of the lost Mother Box, also known as the
Change Engine, is shared by the Stone in a novel by Charles Williams,
Many Dimensions . See the Solomon's Cube webpage.

See too the matrix of Claude Lévi-Strauss in posts tagged
Verwandlungslehre .

Some literary background:

Who speaks in primordial images speaks to us
as with a thousand trumpets, he grips and overpowers,
and at the same time he elevates that which he treats
out of the individual and transitory into the sphere of
the eternal. 
— C. G. JUNG

"In the conscious use of primordial images—
the archetypes of thought—
one modern novelist stands out as adept and
grand master: Charles Williams.
In The Place of the Lion  he incarnates Plato’s
celestial archetypes with hair-raising plausibility.
In Many Dimensions  he brings a flock of ordinary
mortals face to face with the stone bearing
the Tetragrammaton, the Divine Name, the sign of Four.
Whether we understand every line of a Williams novel
or not, we feel something deep inside us quicken
as Williams tells the tale.

Here, in The Greater Trumps , he has turned to
one of the prime mysteries of earth . . . ."

— William Lindsay Gresham, Preface (1950) to
Charles Williams's The Greater Trumps  (1932)

For fans of what the recent series Westworld  called "bulk apperception" —

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Plea

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 AM

Ken Yuszkus, Salem News  staff photo

SALEM — The former MIT professor from Hamilton
accused of trying to swindle his son’s widow and children
out of nearly $5 million pleaded not guilty to the charges
on Friday in Salem Superior Court. 

John Donovan Sr., 75, was clutching a set of rosary beads
as he entered his plea before Judge Timothy Feeley. 

Donovan was indicted last month by an Essex County grand jury
on 13 counts, including larceny, forgery and witness intimidation. 

. . . .


— Julie Manganis, Salem News  staff writer, Jan. 13, 2018

See also other posts tagged Systems Programming.

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Cameron on All Saints’ Day

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:01 PM

"Nowdays, Halloween involves plastic figures of ghosts and bats
bought from the supermarket; this is driven by commerce and
in some people’s view is an American import. But it is clear that
this time of year was traditionally regarded as one where the barrier
between this world and the other was low, and supernatural
manifestations were to be expected."

Peter J. Cameron today.

Remarks related to another "barrier" and vértigo horizontal

See also a search for  Horizon + "Western Australia"  in this  journal.

From that search:  A sort of horizon, a "line at infinity," that is perhaps
more meaningful to most Cameron readers than the above remarks
by Borges —

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

The Source (Not by Michener)

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:18 AM
 

Wikipedia:  Taiji (philosophy)

Etymology

The word 太極 comes from I Ching : "易有太極,是生兩儀,兩儀生四象,四象生八卦,八卦定吉凶,吉凶生大業。"

Taiji  (太極) is a compound of tai   "great; grand; supreme; extreme; very; too" (a superlative variant of da   "big; large; great; very") and ji   "pole; roof ridge; highest/utmost point; extreme; earth's pole; reach the end; attain; exhaust". In analogy with the figurative meanings of English pole, Chinese ji  極 "ridgepole" can mean "geographical pole; direction" (e.g., siji  四極 "four corners of the earth; world's end"), "magnetic pole" (Beiji  北極 "North Pole" or yinji  陰極 "negative pole; cathode"), or "celestial pole" (baji  八極 "farthest points of the universe; remotest place"). Combining the two words, 太極 means "the source, the beginning of the world".

Common English translations of the cosmological Taiji  are the "Supreme Ultimate" (Le Blanc 1985, Zhang and Ryden 2002) or "Great Ultimate" (Chen 1989, Robinet 2008); but other versions are the "Supreme Pole" (Needham and Ronan 1978), "Great Absolute", or "Supreme Polarity" (Adler 1999).

Monday, October 16, 2017

Highway 61 Revisited

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 10:13 AM

"God said to Abraham …." — Bob Dylan, "Highway 61 Revisited"

Related material — 

See as well Charles Small, Harvard '64, 
"Magic Squares over Fields" —

— and Conway-Norton-Ryba in this  journal.

Some remarks on an order-five  magic square over GF(52):

"Ultra Super Magic Square"

on the numbers 0 to 24:

22   5   18   1  14
  3  11  24   7  15
  9  17   0  13  21
10  23   6  19   2
16   4  12  20   8

Base-5:

42  10  33  01  24 
03  21  44  12  30 
14  32  00  23  41
20  43  11  34  02
31  04  22  40  13 

Regarding the above digits as representing
elements of the vector 2-space over GF(5)
(or the vector 1-space over GF(52)) 

All vector row sums = (0, 0)  (or 0, over GF(52)).
All vector column sums = same.

Above array as two
orthogonal Latin squares:
   
4 1 3 0 2     2 0 3 1 4
0 2 4 1 3     3 1 4 2 0 
1 3 0 2 4     4 2 0 3 1         
2 4 1 3 0     0 3 1 4 2
3 0 2 4 1     1 4 2 0 3

— Steven H. Cullinane,
      October 16, 2017

Saturday, September 30, 2017

Where Angels Fear to Tread

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:38 AM

From the online New York Times  this morning —

"Origin  is Mr. Brown’s eighth novel. It finds his familiar protagonist,
the brilliant Harvard professor of symbology and religious iconography
Robert Langdon, embroiled once more in an intellectually challenging,
life-threatening adventure involving murderous zealots, shadowy fringe
organizations, paradigm-shifting secrets with implications for the future
of humanity, symbols within puzzles and puzzles within symbols and
a female companion who is super-smart and super-hot.

As do all of Mr. Brown’s works, the new novel does not shy away from
the big questions, but rather rushes headlong into them."

— Profile of Dan Brown by Sarah Lyall

See also yesterday's Log24 post on the Feast of St. Michael and All Angels.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Stability

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:35 PM

"She wrote her doctoral thesis, which was supervised
by Friedrichs, on the stability of a spherical implosion
and was awarded her Ph.D. in 1951."

MacTutor

See also a related Google Image Search.

For images from the reported date of Morawetz's death,
see Theology for Child Buyers.

Update of 2:56 PM ET Friday, August 11, 2017 —

Legacy.com and NYU now report that Morawetz died
on Tue., Aug. 8, not, as the AMS reported, on Mon., Aug. 7.
(The AMS has now corrected its error.)

For sloppiness about mathematics that echoes this
sloppiness about dates, see a post of Tue., Aug. 8.

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Truly Tasteless* Tulips

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:29 PM

Excerpt from the above story

"The project could also be a new frontier for Mr. Koons.
'It’s superconceptual,' said Judith Benhamou-Huet,
a French art critic and blogger, in that 'he’s giving
the concept but not the realization.' She compared
the approach to that of Sol LeWitt, who sold wall drawings
that buyers then executed on their own."

Rachel Donadio

See also the previous post and Rota on Beauty.

* A reference to Truly Tasteless Jokes , by Blanche Knott
  (Book 1 of 11, Ballantine Books paperback, May 1985, page 50).

Friday, June 9, 2017

Proprietary Code

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:14 AM

    Quixote Vive!Terry Gilliam, June 4, 2017

Review of a post from March 7, 2017

"The supervisory read-only memory (SROM)
in question is a region of proprietary code
that runs when the chip starts up,
and in privileged mode."

— Elliot Williams at Hackaday , March 4, 2017,
     "Reading the Unreadable SROM"

From a reply to a comment on the above story —

"You are singing a very fearful and oppressive tune.
You ought to try to get it out of your head."

A perhaps less oppressive tune —

Related scene —

Richard Kiley in "Blackboard Jungle," 1955:

IMAGE- Richard Kiley in 'Blackboard Jungle,' with grids and broken records

Friday, May 26, 2017

Headline Style at The New York Times

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 AM

Sounds like a job for Amy Adams.

Amy Adams at the Lancia Café in Taormina, Sicily, on June 15, 2013.
Adams was in Taormina for the Italian premiere of her Superman film.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Logos Review

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:32 PM

From Balboa Press —

More than a pretty face designed to identify a product, a logo combines powerful elements super boosted with sophisticated branding techniques. Logos spark our purchasing choice and can affect our wellbeing.

Lovingly detailed, researched and honed to deliver a specific intention, a logo contains a unique dynamic that sidesteps our conscious mind. We might not know why we prefer one product over another but the logo, designed to connect the heart of the brand to our own hearts, plays a vital part in our decision to buy.

The power of symbols to sway us has been recognised throughout history. Found in caves and in Egyptian temples they are attributed with the strength to foretell and create the future, connect us with the divine and evoke emotions, from horror to ecstasy, at a glance.  The new symbols we imbue with these awesome powers are our favourite brand logos.

• Discover the unconscious effect of these modern symbols that thrust our most successful global corporations into the limelight and our lives.

• Learn to make informed choices about brands.

• Find out how a logo reflects the state of the brand and holds it to account.

The date of the above remarks on a logo change, March 24, 2016,
suggests a review of a Log24 post from that date —

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Philosophy Notes

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:01 AM

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Ripples

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:25 PM

A Scottish physicist credited with key experimental work
in the sensing of space-time ripples has died, today's
online New York Times  reports.

From a BBC obituary online on Wed., March 8, 2017 —

An unconventional R.I.P. from this journal on March 7,
the reported date of the ripple-seeker's death —

"The supervisory read-only memory (SROM)
in question is a region of proprietary code
that runs when the chip starts up,
and in privileged mode."

— Elliot Williams at Hackaday , March 4, 2017,
     "Reading the Unreadable SROM"

Some R.I.P. backstory from a recent film, "Passengers" —

DECK TWO – LIBRARY – DAY

Aurora sits at a library workstation . . .

AURORA

What about research articles, any kind of
technical documents?

WORKSTATION

Hibernation technology is proprietary.
The following articles deal with the subject
on a theoretical level. 

For a "theoretical level" I prefer, see a passage quoted in
the above March 7 Log24 post, "Hackaday Story" —

According to Orphic myth —

  " You will find to the left of the House of Hades
    a spring,
  And by the side thereof standing
    a white cypress.
  To this spring approach not near.
  But you shall find another,
    from the lake of Memory
  Cold water flowing forth, and there are
    guardians before it.
  Say, 'I am a child of Earth and starry Heaven;
  But my race is of Heaven alone.
    This you know yourselves.
  But I am parched with thirst and I perish.
    Give me quickly
  The cold water flowing forth
    from the lake of Memory.' "

See as well today's previous post.

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Raise High the Ridgepole, Architects*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:40 PM

A post suggested by remarks of J. D. Salinger in 
The New Yorker  of November 19, 1955 —

Wikipedia:  Taiji (philosophy)

Etymology

The word 太極 comes from I Ching : "易有太極,是生兩儀,兩儀生四象,四象生八卦,八卦定吉凶,吉凶生大業。"

Taiji  (太極) is a compound of tai   "great; grand; supreme; extreme; very; too" (a superlative variant of da   "big; large; great; very") and ji   "pole; roof ridge; highest/utmost point; extreme; earth's pole; reach the end; attain; exhaust". In analogy with the figurative meanings of English pole, Chinese ji  極 "ridgepole" can mean "geographical pole; direction" (e.g., siji  四極 "four corners of the earth; world's end"), "magnetic pole" (Beiji  北極 "North Pole" or yinji  陰極 "negative pole; cathode"), or "celestial pole" (baji  八極 "farthest points of the universe; remotest place"). Combining the two words, 太極 means "the source, the beginning of the world".

Common English translations of the cosmological Taiji  are the "Supreme Ultimate" (Le Blanc 1985, Zhang and Ryden 2002) or "Great Ultimate" (Chen 1989, Robinet 2008); but other versions are the "Supreme Pole" (Needham and Ronan 1978), "Great Absolute", or "Supreme Polarity" (Adler 1999).

See also Polarity in this journal.

* A phrase adapted, via Salinger,
from a poem by Sappho

Ἴψοι δὴ τὸ μέλαθρον,
     Υ᾽μήναον
ἀέρρετε τέκτονεσ ἄνδρεσ,
     Υ᾽μήναον
γάμβροσ ἔρχεται ἶσοσ Ά᾽ρευϊ,
     [Υ᾽μήναον]
ανδροσ μεγάλο πόλυ μείζων
     [Υ᾽μήναον]

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Hackaday Story

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:48 PM

Cypress Spring 

according to Orphic myth

  " You will find to the left of the House of Hades
    a spring,
  And by the side thereof standing
    a white cypress.
  To this spring approach not near.
  But you shall find another,
    from the lake of Memory
  Cold water flowing forth, and there are
    guardians before it.
  Say, 'I am a child of Earth and starry Heaven;
  But my race is of Heaven alone.
    This you know yourselves.
  But I am parched with thirst and I perish.
    Give me quickly
  The cold water flowing forth
    from the lake of Memory.' "

"The supervisory read-only memory (SROM)
in question is a region of proprietary code
that runs when the chip starts up,
and in privileged mode."

— Elliot Williams at Hackaday , March 4, 2017,
     "Reading the Unreadable SROM"

From a reply to a comment on the above story —

"You are singing a very fearful and oppressive tune.
You ought to try to get it out of your head."

A perhaps less oppressive tune —

Related scene —

Richard Kiley in "Blackboard Jungle," 1955:

IMAGE- Richard Kiley in 'Blackboard Jungle,' with grids and broken records

See also the Go chip in this journal.

Monday, February 27, 2017

Logic for Jews

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:07 PM

(Continued)

Adam Gopnik in The New Yorker  today reacts to the startling
outcomes of three recent contests: the presidential election,
the Super Bowl, and the Oscar for Best Picture —

"The implicit dread logic is plain."

Related material —

Transformers in this journal and

“Lord Arglay had a suspicion that the Stone would be
purely logical.  Yes, he thought, but what, in that sense,
were the rules of its pure logic?”

Many Dimensions  (1931), by Charles Williams

See also

The above figure is from Ian Stewart's 1996 revision of a 1941 classic, 
What Is Mathematics? , by Richard Courant and Herbert Robbins.

One wonders how the confused slave boy of Plato's Meno  would react
to Stewart's remark that

"The number of copies required to double an
 object's size depends on its dimension."

Saturday, October 1, 2016

Rippling Rhythms

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

The previous post presented Plato's Meno diagram as
an illustration of (superimposed) yin and yang.

For those who prefer a more fluid approach to yin and yang —

From a June 15, 2016, Caltech news release on gravitational waves —

Audio

The "chirp" tones of the two LIGO detections are available for download. Formats are suitable as ringtones for either iPhone or Android devices. (Instructions for installing custom ringtones)

September 2015 Detection

December 2015 Detection

Related commentary from July 2015 and earlier —

See posts tagged Haiku.

A different perspective —

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Logos

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:00 AM

From RIP, a post of Wednesday, March 16, 2016

See also earlier posts tagged Sermon Weekend.

From Balboa Press

More than a pretty face designed to identify a product, a logo combines powerful elements super boosted with sophisticated branding techniques. Logos spark our purchasing choice and can affect our wellbeing.

Lovingly detailed, researched and honed to deliver a specific intention, a logo contains a unique dynamic that sidesteps our conscious mind. We might not know why we prefer one product over another but the logo, designed to connect the heart of the brand to our own hearts, plays a vital part in our decision to buy.

The power of symbols to sway us has been recognised throughout history. Found in caves and in Egyptian temples they are attributed with the strength to foretell and create the future, connect us with the divine and evoke emotions, from horror to ecstasy, at a glance.  The new symbols we imbue with these awesome powers are our favourite brand logos.

• Discover the unconscious effect of these modern symbols that thrust our most successful global corporations into the limelight and our lives.

• Learn to make informed choices about brands.

• Find out how a logo reflects the state of the brand and holds it to account.

Monday, August 29, 2016

Roll Credits

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:29 AM

Click images for some backstories.

  

  

    Pink hexagram in cube

Related material: The Wet Hot Summa.

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Logos and Logic

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:11 PM

"Logos and logic, crystal hypothesis,
 Incipit and a form to speak the word
 And every latent double in the word…."

— Wallace Stevens,
    "Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction,"
     Section I, Canto VIII

    

Narratives

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:00 PM

The novel Blood on Snow , set in Oslo, was published
by Knopf on April 7, 2015.  This journal on that date —

Log24 on Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Logic

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:00 PM 

Seven years ago in this journal —

The above links:  the Stone,  the rules.

A related image —

Thursday, June 30, 2016

Rubik vs. Galois: Preconception vs. Pre-conception

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:20 PM

From Psychoanalytic Aesthetics: The British School ,
by Nicola Glover, Chapter 4  —

In his last theoretical book, Attention and Interpretation  (1970), Bion has clearly cast off the mathematical and scientific scaffolding of his earlier writings and moved into the aesthetic and mystical domain. He builds upon the central role of aesthetic intuition and the Keats's notion of the 'Language of Achievement', which

… includes language that is both
a prelude to action and itself a kind of action;
the meeting of psycho-analyst and analysand
is itself an example of this language.29.

Bion distinguishes it from the kind of language which is a substitute  for thought and action, a blocking of achievement which is lies [sic ] in the realm of 'preconception' – mindlessness as opposed to mindfulness. The articulation of this language is possible only through love and gratitude; the forces of envy and greed are inimical to it..

This language is expressed only by one who has cast off the 'bondage of memory and desire'. He advised analysts (and this has caused a certain amount of controversy) to free themselves from the tyranny of the past and the future; for Bion believed that in order to make deep contact with the patient's unconscious the analyst must rid himself of all preconceptions about his patient – this superhuman task means abandoning even the desire to cure . The analyst should suspend memories of past experiences with his patient which could act as restricting the evolution of truth. The task of the analyst is to patiently 'wait for a pattern to emerge'. For as T.S. Eliot recognised in Four Quartets , 'only by the form, the pattern / Can words or music reach/ The stillness'.30. The poet also understood that 'knowledge' (in Bion's sense of it designating a 'preconception' which blocks  thought, as opposed to his designation of a 'pre -conception' which awaits  its sensory realisation), 'imposes a pattern and falsifies'

For the pattern is new in every moment
And every moment is a new and shocking
Valuation of all we have ever been.31.

The analyst, by freeing himself from the 'enchainment to past and future', casts off the arbitrary pattern and waits for new aesthetic form to emerge, which will (it is hoped) transform the content of the analytic encounter.

29. Attention and Interpretation  (Tavistock, 1970), p. 125

30. Collected Poems  (Faber, 1985), p. 194.

31. Ibid., p. 199.

See also the previous posts now tagged Bion.

Preconception  as mindlessness is illustrated by Rubik's cube, and
"pre -conception" as mindfulness is illustrated by n×n×n Froebel  cubes
for n= 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Suitably coordinatized, the Froebel  cubes become Galois  cubes,
and illustrate a new approach to the mathematics of space .

Saturday, June 4, 2016

A Personal View

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:20 AM

"The editors are also grateful to
T. Kibble and Imperial College Press
for permission to reprint B. Zumino's paper
'Supersymmetry: A Personal View' . . . ."

— Preface to Symmetry in Mathematics and Physics
(AMS, 2009), a book based on talks at
a UCLA conference of Jan. 18-20, 2008

(For the book's title page, see yesterday morning's post Symmetry.)

This suggests a search in this journal for the term "supersymmetry."
That search yields some links that may be of further interest to
devotees of the Church of Synchronology.

Monday, April 11, 2016

Gospel of the Nobodies

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:56 PM

"Principles before personalities" — AA saying

Principles

From an April 8 Princeton obituary of a mathematician —

" Moore embodied a 'Princeton style' that made him
a challenging and influential presence in the careers
of his students, said Joseph Neisendorfer, a professor
of mathematics at the University of Rochester who
received his Ph.D. in mathematics from Princeton in
1972. Because of Moore's style, his students would
write theses that 'almost without exception' were
significant advances in mathematics, Neisendorfer said.

'There's a certain Princeton style that focuses on
precision, centrality and simplicity. He was a superb
mathematician and he exercised a lot of influence
by imparting his style to his students,' Neisendorfer said.
'He epitomized the Princeton style.' "

Personalities 

Gospel of the Nobodies 

Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Global Game

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:06 PM

Seymour Lazar, Flamboyant Entertainment Lawyer, Dies at 88

The New York Times  this evening has an obituary for Seymour Lazar, 
"Seymour the Head in Supermoney George Goodman’s 1972 account
of the global financial game, written under the pen name Adam Smith."

From that obituary —

"It was in Cuernavaca that Mr. Goodman, quite skeptical of the Lazar lore
he had heard so much of, met the man behind the myth. 'Seymour was
real,' he wrote…."

As is the Hungarian algorithm.

Mr. Lazar reportedly died on March 30. This journal on that date

Thursday, March 31, 2016

Devil’s Gate Revisited

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:27 AM

The revisiting, below, of an image shown here in part
on Spy Wednesday, 2016, was suggested in part by
a New York Times  obituary today for a Nobel-prize
winning Hungarian novelist. 

Note the references on the map to 
"Devil's Gate" and "Pathfinder."

See also the following from a review of The Pathseeker , a novel 
by the Nobel laureate (Imre Kertész), who reportedly died today —

The commissioner is in fact not in search of a path, but rather of traces of the past (more literally the Hungarian title means ‘trace seeker’). His first shock comes at his realization that the site of his sufferings has been converted into a museum, complete with tourists “diligently carrying off the significance of things, crumb by crumb, wearing away a bit of the unspoken importance” (59). He meets not only tourists, however. He also comes across paradoxically “unknown acquaintances who were just as much haunted by a compulsion to revisit,” including a veiled woman who slowly repeats to him the inventory of those she lost: “my father, my younger brother, my fiancé” (79). The commissioner informs her that he has come “to try to redress that injustice” (80). When she asks how, he suddenly finds the words he had sought, “as if he could see them written down: ‘So that I should bear witness to everything I have seen’” (80).

The act of bearing witness, however, proves elusive. In the museum he is compelled to wonder, “What could this collection of junk, so cleverly, indeed all too cleverly disguised as dusty museum material, prove to him, or to anyone else for that matter,” and adds the chilling observation, “Its objects could be brought to life only by being utilized” (71). As he touches the rust-eaten barbed wire fence he thinks, “A person might almost feel in the mood to stop and dutifully muse on this image of decay – were he not aware, of course, that this was precisely the goal; that the play of ephemerality was merely a bait for things” (66). It is this play of ephemerality, the possibility that the past will be consigned to the past, against which the commissioner struggles, yet his struggle is frustrated precisely by the lack of resistance, the indifference of the objects he has come to confront. “What should he cling on to for proof?” he wonders. “What was he to fight with, if they were depriving him of every object of the struggle? Against what was he to try and resist, if nothing was resisting?” (68) He had come with the purpose of “advertis[ing] his superiority, celebrat[ing] the triumph of his existence in front of these mute and powerless things. His groundless disappointment was fed merely by the fact that this festive invitation had received no response. The objects were holding their peace” (109). 

In point of fact The Pathseeker  makes no specific mention either of the Holocaust or of the concentration camps, yet the admittedly cryptic references to places leave no doubt that this is its subject. Above the gate at the camp the commissioner’s wife reads the phrase, “Jedem das Seine,” to each his due, and one recalls the sign above the entrance to the camp at Buchenwald. Further references to Goethe as well as the Brabag factory, where Kertész himself worked as a prisoner, confirm this. Why this subterfuge on the part of the author? Why a third-person narrative with an unnamed protagonist when so many biographical links tie the author to the story? One cannot help but wonder if Kertész sought specifically to avoid binding his story to particulars in order to maintain the ultimately metaphysical nature of the quest. Like many of Kertész’s works,The Pathseeker  is not about the trauma of the Holocaust itself so much as the trauma of survival. The self may survive but the triumph of that survival is chimerical.

Translator Tim Wilkinson made the bold decision, in translating the title of the work, not to resort to the obvious. Rather than simply translate Nyomkereső , an allusion to the Hungarian translation of James Fenimore Cooper’s The Pathfinder , back into English, he preserves an element of the unfamiliar in his title. This tendency marks many of the passages of the English translation, in which Wilkinson has opted to preserve the winding and often frustratingly serpentine nature of many of the sentences of the original instead of rewriting them in sleek, familiar English.  . . .

— Thomas Cooper

"Sleek, familiar English" —

"Those were the good old days!" — Applegate in "Damn Yankees"
(See previous post.)

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Rivalry

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 PM

See also In Memoriam, a post of March 27, 2016.

The Robin Wright at right above is the author, not the actress.

Friday, March 18, 2016

The Stone…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:30 PM

of  Woody Allen's  philosopher

"Deadline reports that Stone is finalizing a deal
to star in Maniac , a 30-minute television series with
her former Superbad  castmate Jonah Hill.
The project, a dark comedy, will be directed by 
True Detective  alum Cary Fukunaga and is based
on a 2014 Norwegian series about a mental-institution
patient living out a fantasy life in his dreams."

Vanity Fair  today

See as well the previous post and Jews Telling Stories.

Update of 11:07 PM ET —

From Variety  today — "Hill and Stone would also make their
TV producing debut as the two stars are attached to exec produce
with  Anonymous Content’s Michael Sugar and Doug Wald …."

"The problem is having a solid business plan and knowing what
you're doing, whether it's a movie, a TV series or a company."
Steve Golin in The Hollywood Reporter , Sept. 4, 2013

Thursday, March 17, 2016

The Frankfurter Legacy

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:38 PM

Detail of images from this evening's Harvard Crimson
(click for a wider view) —

Click either image below for some backstory.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04B/041215-Frankfort.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Amy Schumer and Seth Rogen form the Bud Light Party in 2016 Super Bowl commercial

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Harvey’s Wake

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 PM

See Supercomputer Blood Flow and
an American Physical Society talk.

See also Harvey Court and Adam's Eve.

Sunday, February 28, 2016

High Concept:

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:00 PM

Daily Globe  Meets  Daily PlaNet

Office scene from "Spotlight," a 2015 film about The Boston Globe

Detail of the above office scene 

A photo from the Web of Mount Baker and Bellingham WA 
that may or may not match the "Spotlight" picture's location.

Update of 1 AM on March 3, 2016 —

A much better match for the "Spotlight" office picture is this image of
Mount Illimani and La Paz, Bolivia, from dreamstime.com

Sunday, February 7, 2016

For Fast EDI

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:29 PM

Stealth (the movie) and Stealth (the Super Bowl ad)

Monday, February 1, 2016

The Hiroshima Preprint

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:00 PM

This morning at 11:44 I happened upon

This was published as

Toshiyuki Katsura, Shigeyuki Kondo, Ichiro Shimada,
"On the supersingular K3 surface in characteristic 5 with Artin invariant 1,"
Michigan Mathematical Journal , vol. 63, issue 4 (Dec. 2014), 803–844.

Related material from later today —

See also earlier Log24 remarks on the Hoffman-Singleton graph
and a remark on geometry for Princeton.

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Symmetry Framed

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 3:26 PM

The cover of the K. O. Friedrichs book From Pythagoras to Einstein 
shown in the previous post suggests a review (click the Log24 
images for webpages where they can be manipulated) ….

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110209-SymFrameBWPage.gif

The "more sophisticated" link in the first image above
leads to a webpage by Alexander Bogomolny
"Pythagoras' Theorem by Tessellation," that says
"This is a subtle and beautiful proof."

Bogomolny refers us to the Friedrichs book, from which one of
the illustrations of the proof by tessellation is as follows —

For a quite different use of superposition, see
The Lindbergh Manifesto (May 19, 2015).

Monday, September 14, 2015

Happy Birthday to…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:15 AM

The actor who portrayed the angel Uriel in the TV series
"Supernatural," Robert Wisdom.

See also the angel Uriel in the novel Weaveworld .

Sunday, August 30, 2015

Lines

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:01 AM

"We tell ourselves stories in order to live." — Joan Didion

A post from St. Augustine's day, 2015, may serve to
illustrate this.

The post started with a look at a painting by Swiss artist
Wolf Barth, "Spielfeld." The painting portrays two
rectangular arrays, of four and of twelve subsquares, 
that sit atop a square array of sixteen subsquares.

To one familiar with Euclid's "bride's chair" proof of the
Pythagorean theorem, "Spielfeld" suggests a right triangle
with squares on its sides of areas 4, 12, and 16.

That image in turn suggests a diagram illustrating the fact
that a triangle suitably inscribed in a half-circle is a right 
triangle… in this case, a right triangle with angles of 30, 60,
and 90 degrees… Thus —

In memory of screenwriter John Gregory Dunne (husband
of Joan Didion and author of, among other things, The Studio
here is a cinematric approach to the above figure.

The half-circle at top suggests the dome of an observatory.
This in turn suggests a scene from the 2014 film "Magic in
the Moonlight."  

As she gazes at the silent universe above
through an opening in the dome, the silent
Emma Stone is perhaps thinking, 
prompted by her work with Spider-Man

"Drop me a line."

As he  gazes at the crack in the dome,
Stone's costar Colin Firth contrasts the vastness 
of the Universe with the smallness of Man, citing 

"the tiny field F2 with two elements."

In conclusion, recall the words of author Norman Mailer
that summarized his Harvard education —

"At times, bullshit can only be countered
with superior bullshit."

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Design Thinking

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:14 AM

This post was suggested in part by last night's post
of 11:14 PM ET, Southern Charm, and by a post
of 11/14 last year, Another Opening, Another Show.

See also Design Thinking at Wikipedia and the following
two quotations —

CHARLESTON COUNTY, SC (WCSC) (today)
Dr. Gerrita Postlewait's contract for Superintendent
of Charleston County Schools was approved and
signed in a meeting with school board members 
Wednesday morning, a school system official says….
From 2006 to 2013, she was the chief K-12 officer for
the Stupski Foundation, a San Francisco-based
education reform nonprofit. [See related page.]

PHILANTHROPY.COM (Aug. 2, 2012)
Chris Tebben, executive director of Grantmakers for
Education, says the [Stupski] foundation was among
the first to consider how the problem-solving approach
known as “design thinking” could play a role in improving
education.

Related cinematic remarks:  Robot Overlords (now on-demand).

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Literary Notes

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:00 AM

From an interview by Glen Duncan with author
Susanna Moore published on January 29, 2013 —

When did you first realize that you wanted to write fiction? Was there an epiphanic moment?

I was a voracious reader as a child, clearing out the local library (my mother had given me a letter for the librarian, attesting that the books that I borrowed were for her reading alone), and I began to write plays, usually starring myself, when I was 9 or 10. There were years of bad poetry. I was features editor of the Punahou school newspaper. But at no moment did I clearly decide that I was going to be a writer, nor did it feel as if I had always been one. I left home for the mainland (I grew up in Hawaii) when I was 17 with no money or education beyond Punahou and the books that I’d read, and knew that I had to earn my living. I had a fantasy that I’d be a reporter and was sent by an equally naïve friend to Walter Annenberg, the owner of The Philadelphia Inquirer , who promptly sent me to the classified ad room, where I became an ad-taker. I’ve always thought that it was very good training: A man would call to place an ad in the hope of selling his used bed, and I would have to write a convincing few sentences on his behalf. I later read scripts for Jack Nicholson and oddly enough had to do the same thing – condense a complicated proposal into a statement of a dozen words.

We’ve talked before about how feeling different from the people around us – “mutant” was the word you used – informs or underpins the burgeoning writer’s mentality. Could you expand on that?

By mutant, I mean that state in childhood and adolescence of isolation, sometimes blissful, often bewildering, when you realize that you have little in common with the people closest to you – not because you are superior in intelligence or sensitivity, but because you perceive the world in an utterly different way, which you assume to be a failing on your part. It was only through reading and discovering characters who shared that feeling that I realized when I was about 14 that I wasn’t insane. And yes, I think that the sensation, the awareness and then the conviction that your perception of the world is not what might be called conventional, is essential to the making of an artist. It is a little like speaking a different language from the people around you – it affords you solitude, but it also means that you are sometimes misunderstood.

Related material:

Midnight Politics,  X-Woman,  "Welcome to Me,"  and
the following meditation on the word "binder"—

Monday, February 23, 2015

For Katy Perry

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:15 PM

See also this  journal on the date of Mr. Howard's death:

"Mark my words
This love will make you levitate
Like a bird"

— Katy Perry, "Dark Horse"

“It’s the Super Bowl, I guess,”
Michael Keaton said in the first minutes
of ABC’s official Oscar red-carpet special."

— Hallie Cantor in the online New Yorker  today

Saturday, February 14, 2015

Valentine Dance

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:00 PM

For Eliot and von Franz —

"A dance results."

— Marie-Louise von Franz
     in Number and Time

IMAGE- Halftime dance in 4x4 square, 2015 Super Bowl, with Katy Perry

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Dead Reckoning

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:28 PM

Continued from yesterday evening

IMAGE- Bogart in 'Casablanca' with chessboard

Today's mathematical birthday — 

Claude Chevalley, 11 Feb. 1909 – 28 June 1984.

From MacTutor —

Chevalley's daughter, Catherine Chevalley, wrote about
her father in "Claude Chevalley described by his daughter"
(1988):—

For him it was important to see questions as a whole, to see the necessity of a proof, its global implications. As to rigour, all the members of Bourbaki cared about it: the Bourbaki movement was started essentially because rigour was lacking among French mathematicians, by comparison with the Germans, that is the Hilbertians. Rigour consisted in getting rid of an accretion of superfluous details. Conversely, lack of rigour gave my father an impression of a proof where one was walking in mud, where one had to pick up some sort of filth in order to get ahead. Once that filth was taken away, one could get at the mathematical object, a sort of crystallized body whose essence is its structure. When that structure had been constructed, he would say it was an object which interested him, something to look at, to admire, perhaps to turn around, but certainly not to transform. For him, rigour in mathematics consisted in making a new object which could thereafter remain unchanged.

The way my father worked, it seems that this was what counted most, this production of an object which then became inert— dead, really. It was no longer to be altered or transformed. Not that there was any negative connotation to this. But I must add that my father was probably the only member of Bourbaki who thought of mathematics as a way to put objects to death for aesthetic reasons.

Recent scholarly news suggests a search for Chapel Hill
in this journal. That search leads to Transformative Hermeneutics.
Those who, like Professor Eucalyptus of Wallace Stevens's
New Haven, seek God "in the object itself" may contemplate
yesterday's afternoon post on Eightfold Design in light of the
Transformative post and of yesterday's New Haven remarks and
Chapel Hill events.

Sunday, February 1, 2015

Spielraum III

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:30 PM

From today's Super Bowl Halftime:

Click for image in context.

See also Spielraum  in this journal.

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Drama Club

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:27 AM

Julianne Moore at the Screen Actors Guild awards
on Sunday evening:

"When I was 17, I decided I wanted to be
an actor. It didn't seem possible because
I'd never met a real actor," Moore said.
"So I want to say to all the kids in the
drama club, you guys are the real actors."

On the main character of the new film "Birdman"

"Thomson is clearly talented, yet unable to get out of
the shadow of his superhero role. He is filled with
a simmering rage as Robert Downey Jr. appears
on the TV, arguably the highest profile actor alive
courtesy of a role in the Marvel films."

— Grant Pearsall at The Snapper

A midrash for Robert:

See The Stars My Destination and Cube of Ultron.

Sunday, December 28, 2014

Cube of Ultron

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The Blacklist “Pilot” Review

"There is an element of camp to this series though. Spader is
quite gleefully channeling Anthony Hopkins, complete with being
a well educated, elegant man locked away in a super-cell.
Speaking of that super-cell, it’s kind of ridiculous. They’ve got him
locked up in an abandoned post office warehouse on a little
platform with a chair inside  a giant metal cube that looks like
it could have been built by Tony Stark. And as Liz approaches
to talk to him, the entire front of the cube  opens and the whole
thing slides back to leave just the platform and chair. Really? 
FUCKING REALLY ? "

Kate Reilly at Geekenstein.com (Sept. 27, 2013)

Thursday, September 11, 2014

A Class by Itself

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:48 AM

The American Mathematical Society yesterday:

Harvey Cohn (1923-2014)
Wednesday September 10th 2014

Cohn, an AMS Fellow and a Putnam Fellow (1942), died May 16 at the age of 90. He served in the Navy in World War II and following the war received his PhD from Harvard University in 1948 under the direction of Lars Ahlfors. He was a member of the faculty at Wayne State University, Stanford University, Washington University in St. Louis, the University of Arizona, and at City College of New York, where he was a distinguished professor. After retiring from teaching, he also worked for the NSA. Cohn was an AMS member since 1942.

Paid death notice from The New York Times , July 27, 2014:

COHN–Harvey. Fellow of the American Mathematical Society and member of the Society since 1942, died on May 16 at the age of 90. He was a brilliant Mathematician, an adoring husband, father and grandfather, and faithful friend and mentor to his colleagues and students. Born in New York City in 1923, Cohn received his B.S. degree (Mathematics and Physics) from CCNY in 1942. He received his M.S. degree from NYU (1943), and his Ph.D. from Harvard (1948) after service in the Navy (Electronic Technicians Mate, 1944-46). He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa (Sigma Chi), won the William Lowell Putnam Prize in 1942, and was awarded the Townsend Harris Medal in 1972. A pioneer in the intensive use of computers in an innovative way in a large number of classical mathematical problems, Harvey Cohn held faculty positions at Wayne State University, Stanford, Washington University Saint Louis (first Director of the Computing Center 1956-58), University of Arizona (Chairman 1958-1967), University of Copenhagen, and CCNY (Distinguished Professor of Mathematics). After his retirement from teaching, he worked in a variety of capacities for the National Security Agency and its research arm, IDA Center for Computing Sciences. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Bernice, of Laguna Woods, California and Ft. Lauderdale, FL, his son Anthony, daughter Susan Cohn Boros, three grandchildren and one great-granddaughter.

— Published in The New York Times  on July 27, 2014

See also an autobiographical essay found on the web.

None of the above sources mention the following book, which is apparently by this same Harvey Cohn. (It is dedicated to "Tony and Susan.")

From Google Books:

Advanced Number Theory, by Harvey Cohn
Courier Dover Publications, 1980 – 276 pages
(First published by Wiley in 1962 as A Second Course in Number Theory )

Publisher's description:

" 'A very stimulating book … in a class by itself.'— American Mathematical Monthly

Advanced students, mathematicians and number theorists will welcome this stimulating treatment of advanced number theory, which approaches the complex topic of algebraic number theory from a historical standpoint, taking pains to show the reader how concepts, definitions and theories have evolved during the last two centuries. Moreover, the book abounds with numerical examples and more concrete, specific theorems than are found in most contemporary treatments of the subject.

The book is divided into three parts. Part I is concerned with background material — a synopsis of elementary number theory (including quadratic congruences and the Jacobi symbol), characters of residue class groups via the structure theorem for finite abelian groups, first notions of integral domains, modules and lattices, and such basis theorems as Kronecker's Basis Theorem for Abelian Groups.

Part II discusses ideal theory in quadratic fields, with chapters on unique factorization and units, unique factorization into ideals, norms and ideal classes (in particular, Minkowski's theorem), and class structure in quadratic fields. Applications of this material are made in Part III to class number formulas and primes in arithmetic progression, quadratic reciprocity in the rational domain and the relationship between quadratic forms and ideals, including the theory of composition, orders and genera. In a final concluding survey of more recent developments, Dr. Cohn takes up Cyclotomic Fields and Gaussian Sums, Class Fields and Global and Local Viewpoints.

In addition to numerous helpful diagrams and tables throughout the text, appendices, and an annotated bibliography, Advanced Number Theory  also includes over 200 problems specially designed to stimulate the spirit of experimentation which has traditionally ruled number theory."

User Review –

"In a nutshell, the book serves as an introduction to Gauss' theory of quadratic forms and their composition laws (the cornerstone of his Disquisitiones Arithmeticae) from the modern point of view (ideals in quadratic number fields). I strongly recommend it as a gentle introduction to algebraic number theory (with exclusive emphasis on quadratic number fields and binary quadratic forms). As a bonus, the book includes material on Dirichlet L-functions as well as proofs of Dirichlet's class number formula and Dirichlet's theorem in primes in arithmetic progressions (of course this material requires the reader to have the background of a one-semester course in real analysis; on the other hand, this material is largely independent of the subsequent algebraic developments).

Better titles for this book would be 'A Second Course in Number Theory' or 'Introduction to quadratic forms and quadratic fields'. It is not a very advanced book in the sense that required background is only a one-semester course in number theory. It does not assume prior familiarity with abstract algebra. While exercises are included, they are not particularly interesting or challenging (if probably adequate to keep the reader engaged).

While the exposition is *slightly* dated, it feels fresh enough and is particularly suitable for self-study (I'd be less likely to recommend the book as a formal textbook). Students with a background in abstract algebra might find the pace a bit slow, with a bit too much time spent on algebraic preliminaries (the entire Part I—about 90 pages); however, these preliminaries are essential to paving the road towards Parts II (ideal theory in quadratic fields) and III (applications of ideal theory).

It is almost inevitable to compare this book to Borevich-Shafarevich 'Number Theory'. The latter is a fantastic book which covers a large superset of the material in Cohn's book. Borevich-Shafarevich is, however, a much more demanding read and it is out of print. For gentle self-study (and perhaps as a preparation to later read Borevich-Shafarevich), Cohn's book is a fine read."

Saturday, July 26, 2014

OOPs

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:01 PM

Or:  Two Rivets Short of a Paradigm

Detail from an author photo:

IMAGE- 'House of Cards,' book on Bear Stearns, author photo, with two missing rivets

From rivet-rivet.net:

The philosopher Graham Harman is invested in re-thinking the autonomy of objects and is part of a movement called Object-Oriented-Philosophy (OOP). Harman wants to question the authority of the human being at the center of philosophy to allow the insertion of the inanimate into the equation. With the aim of proposing a philosophy of objects themselves, Harman puts the philosophies of Bruno Latour and Martin Heidegger in dialogue. Along these lines, Harman proposes an unconventional reading of the tool-being analysis made by Heidegger. For Harman, the term tool does not refer only to human-invented tools such as hammers or screwdrivers, but to any kind of being or thing such as a stone, dog or even a human. Further, he uses the terms objects, beings, tools and things, interchangeably, placing all on the same ontological footing. In short, there is no “outside world.”

Harman distinguishes two characteristics of the tool-being: invisibility and totality. Invisibility means that an object is not simply used but is: “[an object] form(s) a cosmic infrastructure of artificial and natural and perhaps supernatural forces, power by which our last action is besieged.” For instance, nails, wooden boards and plumbing tubes do their work to keep a house “running” silently (invisibly) without being viewed or noticed. Totality means that objects do not operate alone but always in relation to other objects–the smallest nail can, for example, not be disconnected from wooden boards, the plumbing tubes or from the cement. Depending on the point of view of each entity (nail, tube, etc.) a different reality will emerge within the house. For Harman, “to refer to an object as a tool-being is not to say that it is brutally exploited as a means to an end, but only that it is torn apart by the universal duel between the silent execution of an object’s reality and the glistening aura of its tangible surface.”

— From “The Action of Things,” an M.A. thesis at the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, by Manuela Moscoso, May 2011, edited by Sarah Demeuse

From Wikipedia, a programming paradigm:

See also posts tagged Turing’s Cathedral, and Alley  Oop (Feb. 11, 2003).

Friday, July 4, 2014

The Hallowed Crucible

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:00 PM

Continues

“A physicist who played a central role in developing
the theory of supersymmetry – often known as SUSY –
has died.”

Times Higher Education , July 3, 2014

In honor of the above physicist, Bruno Zumino,
here are two sets of Log24 posts:

Structure, May 2-4, 2013 (the dates of a physicists’ celebration
for Zumino’s 90th birthday)

Hallmark, June 21, 2014 (the date of Zumino’s death)

Friday, May 23, 2014

Free-Floating Signs

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 4:30 PM

“You’ve got to pick up every stitch…”
— Donovan, song on closing credits of  To Die For

“…’Supersymmetry’ was originally written
specifically for Her ….” — Pitchfork

“Eventually we see snow particles….”
— Her  screenplay by Spike Jonze

This journal on January 24, 2006:

Context:  See Free-Floating Signs.

Backstory:  Digital Member and  Uneven Break.

Sunday, May 18, 2014

Eyes on the Prize

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

From 1972:

IMAGE- Eyes of girl in 'Rainbow Bridge: Part 5 of 6' video

From 2014:

IMAGE- Commentary by 'Wolven' on Scarlett Johansson's 'Lucy' trailer, April 3, 2014

“Since when did you start writing Chinese?” — Lucy  trailer
See also the Saturday night 11:30 post.

Wolven’s Lucy  midrash is from April 3.  See also this  journal on that date.

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Two -Year College

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:45 AM

See last night’s pentagram photo and a post from May 13, 2012.

That post links to a little-known video of a 1972 film.
A speech from the film was used by Oslo artist Josefine Lyche as a
voice-over in her  2011 golden-ratio video (with pentagrams) that she
exhibited along with a large, wall-filling copy of some of my own work.
The speech (see video below) is clearly nonsense.

The patterns* Lyche copied are not.

“Who are you, anyway?” 

— Question at 00:41 of 15:00, Rainbow Bridge (Part 5 of 9)
at YouTube, addressed to Baron Bingen as “Mr. Rabbit”

* Patterns exhibited again later, apparently without the Lyche pentagram video.
It turns out, by the way, that Lyche created that video by superimposing
audio from the above “Rainbow Bridge” film onto a section of Disney’s 1959
Donald in Mathmagic Land” (see 7:17 to 8:57 of the 27:33 Disney video).

Saturday, May 10, 2014

Test Patterns

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:00 AM

 Raven’s Progressive Matrices  intelligence test—
IMAGE- Raven's Progressive Matrices problem based on triangular half- and quarter-diamonds

Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale  test—  

Related art —  (Click images for further details.)

Patterns suggesting those of the Raven test:

Patterns suggesting those of the Wechsler test:

The latter patterns were derived from the former.

Sunday, December 29, 2013

Good Question

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 PM

Amy Adams in the new film “Her” —

“You’re dating an OS?  What is that like?”

— Question quoted in a Hollywood Reporter
story on the film’s second trailer

From the same story, by Philiana Ng —

” The trailer is set to Arcade Fire’s
mid-tempo ballad ‘Supersymmetry.’ “

Parts of an answer for Amy —

Nov. 26, 2012, as well as

July 19, 2008,

Dec. 18, 2013,

Dec. 24, 2013, and

Dec. 27, 2013.

The Hollywood Reporter  story is from Dec. 3, 2013.
See also that date in this  journal.

Sunday, December 22, 2013

The Bronfman Catechism

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:21 AM

Meanwhile

Log24 on Sunday, October 5, 2008

Theologian James Edwin Loder:

“In a game of chess, the knight’s move is unique because it alone goes around corners. In this way, it combines the continuity of a set sequence with the discontinuity of an unpredictable turn in the middle. This meaningful combination of continuity and discontinuity in an otherwise linear set of possibilities has led some to refer to the creative act of discovery in any field of research as a ‘knight’s move’ in intelligence.”

Related material:

Terence McKenna:

“Schizophrenia is not a psychological disorder peculiar to human beings. Schizophrenia is not a disease at all but rather a localized traveling discontinuity of the space time matrix itself. It is like a travelling whirl-wind of radical understanding that haunts time. It haunts time in the same way that Alfred North Whitehead said that the color dove grey ‘haunts time like a ghost.’”

Anonymous author:

“‘Knight’s move thinking’ is a psychiatric term describing a thought disorder where in speech the usual logical sequence of ideas is lost, the sufferer jumping from one idea to another with no apparent connection. It is most commonly found in schizophrenia.”

Related journalism

IMAGE- Scene from a blackboard jungle

"What's the 'S'  stand for?" — Amy Adams

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:12 PM

The essay excerpted in last night's post on structuralism
is of value as part of a sustained attack by the late
Robert de Marrais on the damned nonsense of the late
French literary theorist Jacques Derrida—

Catastrophes, Kaleidoscopes, String Quartets:
Deploying the Glass Bead Game

Part I:  Ministrations Concerning Silliness, or:
Is “Interdisciplinary Thought” an Oxymoron?

Part II:  Canonical Collage-oscopes, or:
Claude in Jacques’ Trap?  Not What It Sounds Like!

Part III:  Grooving on the Sly with Klein Groups

Part IV:  Claude’s Kaleidoscope . . . and Carl’s

Part V:  Spelling the Tree, from Aleph to Tav
(While  Not Forgetting to Shin)

The response of de Marrais to Derrida's oeuvre  nicely
exemplifies the maxim of Norman Mailer that

"At times, bullshit can only be countered
with superior bullshit."

Friday, October 25, 2013

Abstraction

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:06 PM

Rhetorical questions by art critic Michael Glover

"Has this kind of abstraction to do with ideas
of the spiritual? Are we supposed to see behind
what we have here some kind of evidence of
superhuman energies at work in the universe?
Is this some kind of manifestation of the force
that through the green fuse drives the flower—
to quote a line from Dylan Thomas?"

Rhetorical answer —

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Steam

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

For Jack and Jill.

The above motivational video is from the web page of a middle school
math teacher who was shot to death yesterday morning.

Related journalism —

IMAGE- Scene from a blackboard jungle

See also "S in a Diamond" (here, October 2013)
and "Superman Comes to the Supermarket,"
by Norman Mailer (Esquire , November 1960).

In a recent film, Amy Adams asked Superman,
"What's the S stand for?"

One possible answer, in light of Stephen King's
recent sequel to The Shining  and of
the motivational video above—

Steam.

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

S in a Diamond

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 PM

For Amy Adams, who in a recent
Superman film posed the question

"What's the S stand for?"

This logo appears on the new game
Beyond: Two Souls . (See this evening's
earlier post on the game.)

In a more appealing sort of computer
entertainment, the S might stand for Scarlett.

"Please wait as your operating system is initiated."

(From the October 5th post Dream Girls.) 

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Bright Star

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:29 PM

(Continued. For the title, see Lucero  in this journal.)

See Newton in several works of literary art:

The date, Nov. 23, 2010, of the Westminster Abbey remarks
in the second Newton link above suggests a quite different church 
​from that date.

Tuesday, August 27, 2013

What Seems Insanity

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:29 PM

On a way of seeingsuperimposition
that “seems insanity” (cf. C. S. Lewis’s remarks below)

Combining last night’s post Spectrum with
the August 14 post Valhalla Is Down

From An Experiment in Criticism 
by C.S. Lewis, 1961–

“If we go steadily through all the myths of any people
we shall be appalled by much of what we read.
Most of them, whatever they may have meant to
ancient or savage man, are to us meaningless and
shocking; shocking not only by their cruelty and
obscenity but by their apparent silliness— almost
what seems insanity. Out of this rank and squalid
undergrowth the great myths— Orpheus, Demeter
and Persephone, the Hesperides, Balder, Ragnarok,
or Ilmarinen’s forging of the Sampo– rise like elms.”

Voilà —

The Aug. 14 post Valhalla Is Down referred to a New York Times  blackout.
(Jill Abramson, on earlier being named executive editor at the Times, had
said it was like “ascending into Valhalla.”)

Another Times blackout occurred today.

Lewis’s term Ragnarok refers to the twilight of the gods of Valhalla.

A more conventional illustration from the gamer website Ragnarok/Valhalla Wiki —

Monday, August 26, 2013

Spectrum

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:30 PM

From the weblog of Dr. David Justice today :

C.S. Lewis somewhere (in time, in retirement, I might recover
the passage) surveys the spectrum of plot-outlines, and notes
that that of Orpheus retains its power to spellbind, even in a
bare-bones form, whereas that of almost all worthy modern novels,
become as dust upon such summary.

We venture now  upon that territory where words fail ….

Related material :

C. S. Lewis on Orpheus (click to enlarge) —

Lewis, according to Justice, "surveys the spectrum of plot-outlines."

A related image (see, too, today's previous post) —

C. S. Lewis on myth —

"The stories I am thinking of always have a very simple narrative shape—
a satisfactory and inevitable shape, like a good vase or a tulip."

Conceptual Art

For concepts of prism, spectrum, and tulip combined, see Sicilian Reflections.

"For every kind of vampire, there is a kind of cross."
Gravity's Rainbow

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Taormina Dualism

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:23 PM

"At some point in Greek history, it was noticed that the capital upsilon—Y—
looked like a path branching left and right. The comparison, like so much
traditional material, was ascribed to the Pythagoreans, in accordance with
the dualism just mentioned; our earliest source for it, however, is as late as
the Roman poet Persius (Satires, 3.56)." 

— "The Garden of Forking Paths" in the weblog
   Varieties of Unreligious Experience, Nov. 21, 2006

Amy Adams at the Lancia Café in Taormina, Sicily, on June 15, 2013.
Adams was in Taormina for the Italian premiere of her Superman film.

See also this  journal on that date— June 15, 2013.

Posts related to the Garden of Forking Paths:  Witch Ball (Jan. 24, 2013),
Sermon for Harvard (Sept. 19, 2010), and Amy Adams + Craft.

Thursday, June 20, 2013

ART WARS: Chesterton Thursday

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 PM

The New York Times  philosophy column "The Stone"
last evening had an essay on art by a sarcastic anarchist,
one Crispin Sartwell

"… whole generations of art lovers have been
trained in modernist dogma, and arts institutions’
access to various forms of state or foundation
support depend on it completely. One goes to
the museum to gasp at stunning works of
incomparable, super-human genius by beings
who are infinitely more exalted and important
than the mere humans staring at their paintings.
That’s why ordinary people staring at a Picasso
(allegedly) experience a kind of transcendence
or re-articulation of their lives and world."

 Cubism Re-Articulated:

  Click image for some backstory.

(IMAGE: Walter Gropius and Froebel's Third Gift,
from a Google image search today)

Background: Cubism in this journal and
Pilate Goes to Kindergarten.

Related material: Chesterton + Thursday in this journal.

Monday, June 17, 2013

Savior for Atheists

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:17 PM

"Man of Steel  is subversive mythology for atheists
that exalts a Superman who behaves the way they
think God should but doesn’t."

— Jeff Jensen, "Why the Superman of 'Man of Steel'
is the Jesus we wish Jesus would be," 
Entertainment Weekly  this afternoon

"He's a bird, he's a plane He's our savior?"

— Nicole Sperling, "'Man of Steel's' Christian link,"
Los Angeles Times  this afternoon

Elsewhere on the Web today:

IMAGE- Google sidebar: John Baez as superhero

See also Baez in this journal.

Friday, June 14, 2013

Amy’s Shadow

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:18 PM

Why knows what evil lurks…? — The Shadow

Backstory: "Amy Adams" + Shadow in this journal.

Related material —

Amy Adams as Lois Lane:

In the new Amy Adams version, Superman's Smallville mom
is played by Diane  Lane.

Lane also played George Reeves's sugar mommy
in the 2006 film Hollywoodland .

Ben Affleck and Diane Lane at the 2006 Venice Film Festival
premiere of  Hollywoodland :

See, too, today's previous post, and Amy Adams as Lacey Yeager
in the yet-to-be-made film version of An Object of Beauty .

Monday, June 10, 2013

Galois Coordinates

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:30 PM

Today's previous post on coordinate systems
suggests a look at the phrase "Galois coordinates."

A search shows that the phrase, though natural,
has apparently not been used before 2011* for solutions
to what Hermann Weyl called "the relativity problem."

A thorough historical essay on Galois coordinatization
in this sense would require more academic resources
than I have available. It would likely describe a number
of applications of Galois-field coordinates to square
(and perhaps to cubical) arrays that were studied before
1976, the date of my Diamond Theory  monograph.

But such a survey might not  find any such pre-1976
coordinatization of a 4×4 array  by the 16 elements
of the vector 4-space  over the Galois field with two
elements, GF(2).

Such coordinatizations are important because of their
close relationship to the Mathieu group 24 .

See a preprint by Anne Taormina and Katrin Wendland,
"The overarching finite symmetry group of Kummer
surfaces in the Mathieu group 24 ," with its remark
denying knowledge of any such coordinatization
prior to a 1989 paper by R. T. Curtis.

Related material: 

Some images related to Galois coordinates, excerpted
from a Google search today (click to enlarge)—

*  A rather abstract  2011 paper that uses the phrase
   "Galois coordinates" may have some implications 
   for the naive form of the relativity problem
   related to square and cubical arrays.

Sunday, June 9, 2013

Sicilian Reflections

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 AM

(Continued from Sept. 22, 2011)

See Taormina in this journal, and the following photo of "Anne Newton"—

Click photo for context.

Related material:

"Super Overarching" in this journal,
  a group of order 322,560, and

See also the MAA Spectrum  program —

— and an excerpt from the above book:

From 'Beautiful Mathematics,' by Martin Erickson, an excerpt on the Cullinane diamond theorem (with source not mentioned)

Backstory

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

(Continued)

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract." —A novel from Crosswicks

Related material from a 1905 graduate of Princeton,
"The 3-Space PG(3,2) and Its Group," is now available
at Internet Archive (1 download thus far).

The 3-space paper is relevant because of the
connection of the group it describes to the
"super, overarching" group of the tesseract.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Logline

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:29 AM

Found this morning in a search:

logline  is a one-sentence summary of your script.
www.scriptologist.com/Magazine/Tips/Logline/logline.html
It's the short blurb in TV guides that tells you what a movie
is about and helps you decide if you're interested 

The search was suggested by a screenwriting weblog post,
"Loglines: WHAT are you doing?".

What is your story about?
No, seriously, WHAT are you writing about?
Who are the characters? What happens to them?
Where does it take place? What’s the theme?
What’s the style? There are nearly a million
little questions to answer when you set out
to tell a story. But it all starts with one
super, overarching question.
What are you writing about? This is the first
big idea that we pull out of the ether, sometimes
before we even have any characters.
What is your story about?

The screenwriting post was found in an earlier search for
the highlighted phrase.

The screenwriting post was dated December 15, 2009.

What I am doing now  is checking for synchronicity.

This  weblog on December 15, 2009, had a post
titled A Christmas Carol. That post referred to my 1976
monograph titled Diamond Theory .

I guess the script I'm summarizing right now is about
the heart of that theory, a group of 322,560 permutations
that preserve the symmetry of a family of graphic designs.

For that group in action, see the Diamond 16 Puzzle.

The "super overarching" phrase was used to describe
this same group in a different context:

IMAGE- Anne Taormina on 'Mathieu Moonshine' and the 'super overarching symmetry group'

This is from "Mathieu Moonshine," a webpage by Anne Taormina.

A logline summarizing my  approach to that group:

Finite projective geometry explains
the surprising symmetry properties
of some simple graphic designs— 
found, for instance, in quilts.

The story thus summarized is perhaps not destined for movie greatness.

Saturday, April 27, 2013

Mark and Remark

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:00 AM

“Fact and fiction weave in and out of novels like a shell game.” —R.B. Kitaj

Not just novels.

Fact: 

IMAGE- Anne Taormina on 'Mathieu Moonshine' and the 'super overarching symmetry group'

The mark preceding A in the above denotes the semidirect product.

Symbol from the box-style
I Ching  (Cullinane, 1/6/89).
This is Hexagram 55,
“Abundance [Fullness].”

The mathematical quote, from last evening’s Symmetry, is from Anne Taormina.

The I Ching  remark is not.

Another version of Abbondanza 

IMAGE- Taormina sunset from inabbondanza.com on June 22, 2009

Fiction:

Found in Translation and the giorno  June 22, 2009here.

Friday, April 26, 2013

Symmetry

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:00 PM

Anne Taormina on Mathieu Moonshine —

IMAGE- Anne Taormina on 'Mathieu Moonshine' and the 'super overarching symmetry group'

This is, of course, the same group (of order 322,560) underlying the Diamond 16 Puzzle.

Saturday, April 6, 2013

Seize the Dia

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 PM

On this journal:

"he seems to repeat stuff compulsively punctuated with citing others and berating them for note taken nor credit given of his precedence .. but like i said, he more than makes up for that, dredging up and dusting off his all time faves like a super expensive store keeper who moves a piece only once a decade"

— "poetpiet" on Feb. 23, 2013

This suggests moving a piece linked to here 
(in an update; scroll down) a decade ago.

Photo source: http://evanfazio.com/public-relations-lessons-from-the-chess-board/

The New York Times Magazine cover story
a decade ago, on Sunday, April 6, 2003:

"The artists demanded space
in tune with their aesthetic."

— "The Dia Generation,"
     by Michael Kimmelman

Related material:  Occupy Space in this journal.

Monday, February 4, 2013

The Universe of Discourse

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 PM

A Raven's Remark—

Related material:

Fish Story, Object Lesson, The Universe of Discourse,
Archimedes's Approximation of Pi, and

Saturday, February 2, 2013

Outside the Box

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 AM

In memory of the late Ed Koch
a poem and a link:

Poem — "The Shoebox," by Sheila Gogol

Link  Sheila in this journal

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Clash of the Caped Crusaders

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:29 PM

The New Yorker , quoted here yesterday, on a meeting in 1638 of Galileo and Milton—

"… it’s like those comic-book specials in which Superman meets Batman…."

Related news yesterday from The Hollywood Reporter

IMAGE- Producer Lloyd Phillips dies at 63

      Phillips's upcoming Superman film stars Amy Adams.

      Other entertainment:

      Log24 posts from the day of Phillips's death—

Monday, January 28, 2013

Encounter

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

"Sometime in 1638, John Milton visited Galileo Galilei in Florence. The great astronomer was old and blind and under house arrest, confined by order of the Inquisition, which had forced him to recant his belief that the earth revolves around the sun, as formulated in his 'Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems.' Milton was thirty years old—his own blindness, his own arrest, and his own cosmological epic, 'Paradise Lost,' all lay before him….

Beyond the sheer pleasure of picturing the encounter— it’s like those comic-book specials in which Superman meets Batman— there’s something strange about imagining these two figures inhabiting the same age. Though Milton was the much younger man, in some ways his world system seems curiously older than the astronomer’s empirical universe."

Jonathan Rosen, The New Yorker , June 2, 2008, "Return to Paradise"

More in the spirit of Superman and Batman:

    "Huh. You know what? Galileo didn't even write this."
    "What!"
    "The poem is signed John Milton."
    "John Milton ?" The influential English poet who wrote
Paradise Lost  was a contemporary of Galileo's and a
savant who conspiracy buffs put at the top of their list
of Illuminati suspects. Milton's alleged affiliation with
Galileo's Illuminati was one legend Langdon
suspected was true. Not only had Milton made a
well documented 1638 pilgrimage to Rome to
"commune with enlightened men," but he had held
meetings with Galileo during the scientist's house
arrest, meetings portrayed in many Renaissance
paintings….
    "Milton knew Galileo, didn't he?" Vittoria said, finally
pushing the folio over to Langdon. "Maybe he wrote
the poem as a favor?"

Angels & Demons  , by Dan Brown
     (first published in 2000)

See also this journal on August 16, 2009.

Addendum for Aaron Swartz (see today's previous post)—

"The Vatican, it seemed, took their archives
a bit more seriously than most." — Dan Brown

Monday, December 10, 2012

Review of Leonardo Article

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Review of an often-cited Leonardo  article that is
now available for purchase online

The Tiling Patterns of Sebastien Truchet 
and the Topology of Structural Hierarchy

Authors: Cyril Stanley Smith and Pauline Boucher

Source: Leonardo , Vol. 20, No. 4,
20th Anniversary Special Issue:
Art of the Future: The Future of Art (1987),
pp. 373-385

Published by: The MIT Press

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1578535 .

Smith and Boucher give a well-illustrated account of
the early history of Truchet tiles, but their further remarks
on the mathematics underlying patterns made with
these tiles (see the diamond theorem* of 1976) are
worthless.

For instance

Excerpt from pages 383-384—

"A detailed analysis of Truchet's
patterns touches upon the most fundamental
questions of the relation between
mathematical formalism and the structure
of the material world. Separations
between regions differing in density
require that nothing  be as important as
something  and that large and small cells of
both must coexist. The aggregation of
unitary choice of directional distinction
at interfaces lies at the root of all being
and becoming."

* This result is about Truchet-tile patterns, but the
    underlying mathematics was first discovered by
    investigating superimposed patterns of half-circles .
    See Half-Circle Patterns at finitegeometry.org.

Saturday, September 22, 2012

Occupy Space

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 PM

(Continued)

"The word 'space' has, as you suggest, a large number of different meanings."

Nanavira Thera in [Early Letters. 136] 10.xii.1958

From that same letter (links added to relevant Wikipedia articles)—

Space (ākāsa) is undoubtedly used in the Suttas
to mean 'what/where the four mahābhūtas are not',
or example, the cavities in the body are called ākāsa
M.62—Vol. I, p. 423). This, clearly, is the everyday
'space' we all experience—roughly, 'What I can move
bout in', the empty part of the world. 'What you can't
ouch.' It is the 'space' of what Miss Lounsberry has so
appily described as 'the visible world of our five
senses'. I think you agree with this. And, of course, if
this is the only meaning of the word that we are
going to use, my 'superposition of several spaces' is
disqualified. So let us say 'superposition of several
extendednesses'. But when all these
extendednesses have been superposed, we get
'space'—i.e. our normal space-containing visible
world 'of the five senses'. But now there is another
point. Ākāsa is the negative of the four mahābhūtas,
certainly, but of the four mahābhūtas understood
in the same everyday sense—namely, solids (the
solid parts of the body, hair, nails, teeth, etc.),
liquids (urine, blood, etc.), heat and processes
(digestion) and motion or wind (N.B. not 'air').
These four, together with space, are the normal
furniture of our visible world 'of the five senses',
and it is undoubtedly thus that they are intended
in many Suttas. But there is, for example, a Sutta
(I am not sure where) in which the Ven. Sariputta
Thera is said to be able to see a pile of logs
successively as paṭhavi, āpo, tejo, and vāyo; and
it is evident that we are not on the same level.
On the everyday level a log of wood is solid and
therefore pathavi (like a bone), and certainly not
āpo, tejo, or vāyo. I said in my last letter that I
think that, in this second sense—i.e. as present in,
or constitutive of, any object (i.e. = rupa)—they
are structural and strictly parallel to nama and can
be defined exactly in terms of the Kummer
triangle. But on this fundamental level ākāsa has
no place at all, at least in the sense of our normal
everyday space. If, however, we take it as equivalent
to extendedness then it would be a given arbitrary
content—defining one sense out of many—of which
the four mahābhūtas (in the fundamental sense) are
the structure. In this sense (but only in this sense—
and it is probably an illegitimate sense of ākāsa)
the four mahābhūtas are the structure of space
(or spatial things). Quite legitimately, however, we
can say that the four mahābhūtas are the structure
of extended things—or of coloured things, or of smells,
or of tastes, and so on. We can leave the scientists'
space (full of right angles and without reference to the
things in it) to the scientists. 'Space' (= ākāsa) is the
space or emptiness of the world we live in; and this,
when analyzed, is found to depend on a complex
superposition of different extendednesses (because
all these extendednesses define the visible world
'of the five senses'—which will include, notably,
tangible objects—and this world 'of the five
senses' is the four mahābhūtas [everyday space]
and ākāsa).

Your second letter seems to suggest that the space
of the world we live in—the set of patterns
(superimposed) in which “we” are—is scientific space.
This I quite disagree with—if you do suggest it—,
since scientific space is a pure abstraction, never
experienced by anybody, whereas the superimposed
set of patterns is exactly what I experience—the set
is different for each one of us—, but in all of these
sets 'space' is infinite and undifferentiable, since it is,
by definition, in each set, 'what the four mahābhūtas
are not'. 

A simpler metaphysical system along the same lines—

The theory, he had explained, was that the persona
was a four-dimensional figure, a tessaract in space,
the elementals Fire, Earth, Air, and Water permutating
and pervolving upon themselves, making a cruciform
(in three-space projection) figure of equal lines and
ninety degree angles.

The Gameplayers of Zan ,
a 1977 novel by M. A. Foster

"I am glad you have discovered that the situation is comical:
 ever since studying Kummer I have been, with some difficulty,
 refraining from making that remark."

— Nanavira Thera, [Early Letters, 131] 17.vii.1958

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Incommensurables

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:48 AM

(Continued from Midsummer Eve)

"At times, bullshit can only be countered with superior bullshit."

— Norman Mailer, March 3, 1992, PBS transcript

"Just because it is a transition between incommensurables, the transition between competing paradigms cannot be made a step at a time, forced by logic and neutral experience. Like the gestalt switch, it must occur all at once (though not necessarily in an instant) or not at all."

Thomas Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions , 1962, as quoted in The Enneagram of Paradigm Shifting

"In the spiritual traditions from which Jung borrowed the term, it is not the SYMMETRY of mandalas that is all-important, as Jung later led us to believe. It is their capacity to reveal the asymmetry that resides at the very heart of symmetry." 

The Enneagram as Mandala

I have little respect for Enneagram enthusiasts, but they do at times illustrate Mailer's maxim.

My own interests are in the purely mathematical properties of the number nine, as well as those of the next square, sixteen.

Those who prefer bullshit may investigate non-mathematical properties of sixteen by doing a Google image search on MBTI.

For bullshit involving nine, see (for instance) Einsatz  in this journal.

For non-bullshit involving nine, sixteen, and "asymmetry that resides at the very heart of symmetry," see Monday's Mapping Problem continued. (The nine occurs there as the symmetric  figures in the lower right nine-sixteenths of the triangular analogs  diagram.)

For non-bullshit involving psychological and philosophical terminology, see James Hillman's Re-Visioning Psychology .

In particular, see Hillman's "An Excursion on Differences Between Soul and Spirit."

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Bright Black

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:12 AM

“‘In the dictionary next to [the] word “bright,” you should see Paula’s picture,’ he said. ‘She was super smart, with a sparkling wit. … She had a beautiful sense of style and color.'”

— Elinor J. Brecher in The Miami Herald  on June 8, quoting Palm Beach Post writer John Lantigua on the late art historian Paula Hays Harper

This  journal on the date of her death—

IMAGE- The Trinity of Max Black (a 3-set, with its eight subsets arranged in a Hasse diagram that is also a cube)

For some simpleminded commentary, see László Lovász on the cube space.

Some less simpleminded commentary—

Was ist Raum, wie können wir ihn
erfassen und gestalten?”

Walter Gropius,

The Theory and
Organization of the
Bauhaus
  (1923)

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Dark, Dark, Dark

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Damnation Morning

From her left arm hung a black handbag that closed with a drawstring and from which protruded the tip of a silvery object about which I found myself apprehensively curious.

Her right arm was raised and bent, the elbow touching the door frame, the hand brushing back the very dark bangs from her forehead to show me the sigil, as if that had a bearing on her question.

The sigil was an eight-limbed asterisk made of fine dark lines and about as big as a silver dollar. An X superimposed on a plus sign. It looked permanent.


IMAGE- 'Eight-limbed asterisk' of Fritz Leiber (square version)

Except for the bangs she wore her hair pinned up. Her ears were flat, thin-edged, and nicely shaped, with the long lobes that in Chinese art mark the philosopher. Small square silver flats with rounded corners ornamented them.

Her face might have been painted by Toulouse-Lautrec or Degas. The skin was webbed with very fine lines; the eyes were darkly shadowed and there was a touch of green on the lids (Egyptian?—I asked myself); her mouth was wide, tolerant, but realistic. Yes, beyond all else, she seemed realistic.

Mary Karr

You’re not afraid to show yourself at your lowest ebb. In Lit, you stop breast-feeding because you’ve started drinking again. You describe yourself hiding in a closet with a bottle of whiskey, a bottle of Listerine, and a spit bowl.

It’s not a proud moment. The temptation in Lit was to either make myself seedy or show some glamour. But there wasn’t any. It was just dark, dark, dark for days. Ugly.

Were you surprised by how deeply people related to this dark stuff?

If I’m doing my job then I’m able to make the strange seem familiar. Bad memoirs try to make the strange stranger, to provide something for people to gawk at. I try to create an experience where no matter how bizarre something is, it seems normal. I don’t want readers to balk, I want them to be in the experience. My goal isn’t for people to go, “Oh, poor little Mary Karr,” but rather to have the reader go, “I can be an asshole too,” or just to have enthusiasm for the possibility for change.

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Rainbow People

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:29 PM

(Mythopoetic continued)

Voice of America  today—

Thousands of Norwegians Defy Confessed Killer Breivik in Song

"The demonstrators waved roses and flags
Thursday as they and Norwegian folk singer
Lillebjoern Nilsen sang an adaptation
of the children's song, 'My Rainbow Race,' 
which Breivik in court last week called
an example of Marxist brainwashing."

[See also PETE SEEGER AND LILLEBJØRN NILSEN.
Click on the image below for Seeger's original version.]

Liberia Reacts to Taylor Conviction With Mixed Emotions

"As the verdict was read out, a rainbow was seen
in the sky, encircling the sun.  For many Liberians,
superstition is a part of life.  The rainbow heralded
a new era, they said, beginning with the verdict of Taylor."

["You're not the only one… with mixed emotions."]

Sunday, April 1, 2012

The Palpatine Dimension

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

A physics quote relayed at Peter Woit's weblog today—

"The relation between 4D N=4 SYM and the 6D (2, 0) theory
is just like that between Darth Vader and the Emperor.
You see Darth Vader and you think 'Isn’t he just great?
How can anyone be greater than that? No way.'
Then you meet the Emperor."

— Arkani-Hamed

Some related material from this  weblog—

(See Big Apple and Columbia Film Theory)

http://www.log24.com/log/pix12/120108-Space_Time_Penrose_Hawking.jpg

The Meno Embedding:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101128-TheEmbedding.gif

Some related material from the Web—

IMAGE- The Penrose diamond and the Klein quadric

See also uses of the word triality  in mathematics. For instance…

A discussion of triality by Edward Witten

Triality is in some sense the last of the exceptional isomorphisms,
and the role of triality for n = 6  thus makes it plausible that n = 6
is the maximum dimension for superconformal symmetry,
though I will not give a proof here.

— "Conformal Field Theory in Four and Six Dimensions"

and a discussion by Peter J. Cameron

There are exactly two non-isomorphic ways
to partition the 4-subsets of a 9-set
into nine copies of AG( 3,2).
Both admit 2-transitive groups.

— "The Klein Quadric and Triality"

Exercise: Is Witten's triality related to Cameron's?
(For some historical background, see the triality  link from above
and Cameron's Klein Correspondence and Triality.)

Cameron applies his  triality to the pure geometry of a 9-set.
For a 9-set viewed in the context of physics, see A Beginning

From MIT Commencement Day, 2011—

A symbol related to Apollo, to nine, and to "nothing"

A minimalist favicon—

IMAGE- Generic 3x3 square as favicon

This miniature 3×3 square— http://log24.com/log/pix11A/110518-3x3favicon.ico — may, if one likes,
be viewed as the "nothing" present at the Creation. 
See Feb. 19, 2011, and Jim Holt on physics.

Happy April 1.

Friday, March 23, 2012

Embedding the Stone

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 8:00 AM

"Imbedding the God character in a holy book's very detailed narrative
and building an entire culture around this narrative
seems by itself to confer a kind of existence on Him."

John Allen Paulos in the philosophy column "The Stone,"
     New York Times  online, Oct. 24, 2010

A related post from Log24 later that year—

Sunday, November 28, 2010

The Embedding

 — m759 @ 6:00 AM

The New York Times Magazine  this morning on a seminar on film theory at Columbia University—

"When the seminar reconvened after the break, Schamus said, 'Let’s dive into the Meno,' a dialogue in which Plato and Socrates consider virtue. 'The heart of it is the mathematical proof.' He rose from his seat and went to the whiteboard, where he drew figures and scribbled numbers as he worked through the geometry. 'You can only get the proof visually,' he concluded, stepping back and gazing at it. Plato may be skeptical about the category of the visual, he said, but 'you are confronted with a visual proof that gets you back to the idea embedded in visuality.'"

The Meno Embedding

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101128-TheEmbedding.gif

See also Plato's Code and
 Plato Thanks the Academy.

"Next come the crown of thorns and Jesus' agonized crawl across the stage,
bearing the weight of his own crucifix. And at last, after making
yet another entrance, Mr. Nolan strikes the pose immortalized
in centuries of art, clad in a demure loincloth, arms held out to his sides,
one leg artfully bent in front of the other, head hanging down
in tortured exhaustion. Gently spotlighted, he rises from the stage
as if by magic, while a giant cross, pulsing with hot gold lights,
descends from above to meet him. Mr. Lloyd Webber's churning guitar rock
hits a climactic note, and the audience erupts in excited applause."

— Charles Isherwood, review of "Jesus Christ Superstar" in today's  New York Times

Other remarks on embedding —

Part I

Review of a new book on linguistics, embedding, and a South American tribe—

"Imagine a linguist from Mars lands on Earth to survey the planet's languages…."
Chronicle of Higher Education , March 20, 2012

Part II

The Embedding , by Ian Watson (Review of a 1973 novel from Shakespeare's birthday, 2006)

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

A Strange Thing

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

In memory of songwriter Robert Sherman

L. Frank Baum

See also The Uploading.

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

State of a Nation

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:19 AM

Happy birthday to…

Alicia Keys in 'Superwoman' video

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Collegiality in Action

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:30 PM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix12/120112-BusinessDay.jpg

"The transcripts of the 2006 meetings, released after a standard five-year delay,
clearly show some of the nation’s pre-eminent economic minds did not fully understand
the basic mechanics of the economy that they were charged with supervising."

— Binyamin Appelbaum in the Jan. 12 online New York Times

Academics may recall other examples of comfortably ignorant collegiality.

Thursday, December 15, 2011

Logic for Jews

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:02 PM

New York Daily News , 2:55 PM EST today—

Joe Simon, who dreamed up the star-spangled super hero Captain America while riding on a Manhattan bus during the early days of World War II, died Thursday [Dec. 15] after an undisclosed illness. He was 98.

New York Times , about 10 PM EST today—

Joe Simon, a writer, editor and illustrator of comic books who was a co-creator of the superhero Captain America, conceived out of a patriotic impulse as war was roiling Europe, died on Wednesday [Dec. 14] at his home in Manhattan. He was 98.

The discrepancy is perhaps due to initial reports that quoted Simon's family as saying he died "Wednesday night."

Simon was a co-creator of Captain America. For some background on Simon and a photo with his fellow comic artist Jerry Robinson, co-creator of The Joker, see a Washington Post article from this afternoon. Robinson died on either Wednesday, Dec. 7, or Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011.

Los Angeles Times

Jerry Robinson, a pioneer in the early days of Batman comics and a key force in the creation of Robin the Boy Wonder; the Joker;  Bruce Wayne’s butler, Alfred; and Two-Face, died Wednesday afternoon [Dec. 7] in New York City. He was 89.

CNN

Cartoonist Jerry Robinson, who worked on the earliest Batman comics and claimed credit for creating the super-villain The Joker, died Thursday [Dec. 8] at the age of 89, his family confirmed.

A picture by Robinson—

IMAGE- The Joker with calendar page for November 27

The Joker in January 1943
with a Nov. 27 calendar page

A non-joke from a more recent November 27—

Simplex Sigillum Veri

"Oh, what a tangled web we weave…"

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

More Uncertainty*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 AM

From this morning's online New York Times

Les Daniels, Historian of Comic Books, Dies at 68

By DENNIS HEVESI

Published: November 14, 2011

Les Daniels, one of the earliest historians of comic books— from the launching (off the doomed planet Krypton) of Superman in 1938 through the countercultural comix movement of the ’60s— and an author of horror novels, died on Nov. 5 at his home in Providence, R.I. He was 68.

The cause was a heart attack, said Diane Manning, his sister and only immediate survivor. …

The version at The Comics Reporter  may or may not be more accurate—

Leslie Noel Daniels III, 1943-2011

Posted 7:00 AM PST Nov. 14, 2011

(Unsigned, apparently by Tom Spurgeon.)

The writer Les Daniels died at an unknown moment before November 4 in his Providence apartment, local media sources have reported. Daniels' body was identified by his friend, the illustrator Steve Gervais, on that day, who told the Providence Journal  that it looked like Daniels had been dead a couple of days by the time he saw the body. The police had been called after other acquaintances worried that the they had not been in contact with the writer for an extended period of time. Daniels was a diabetic waiting to receive surgery for a heart-valve replacement. No autopsy was requested. Daniels was 68 years old. …

* The title refers to yesterday's post Uncertainty.

Monday, October 24, 2011

The Hunt for Profitable October

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:23 AM

Wikipedia today—

Paranormal Activity 3  is a 2011 American supernatural horror film. It is the third film of the Paranormal Activity  series and serves as a prequel, set 18 years prior to the events of the first two films. It was released in theaters on October 21, 2011. The film broke financial records upon release, setting a new record for a midnight opening for a horror film ($8M), the best opening day for a horror film in the United States ($26.2M), the highest opening for any film in October, highest opening for a film in the fall (Sep-Oct), and setting a record opening for the franchise ($54M).

So much for Celebration of Mind.

(Background: Last year's Paranormal  post of October 23.)

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