Log24

Monday, March 25, 2019

Espacement

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 1:46 PM

(Continued from the previous post.)

In-Between "Spacing" and the "Chôra "
in Derrida: A Pre-Originary Medium?

By Louise Burchill

(Ch. 2 in Henk Oosterling & Ewa Plonowska Ziarek (Eds.),  Intermedialities: Philosophy, Arts, Politics , Lexington Books, October 14, 2010)

"The term 'spacing' ('espacement ') is absolutely central to Derrida's entire corpus, where it is indissociable from those of différance  (characterized, in the text from 1968 bearing this name, as '[at once] spacing [and] temporizing' 1), writing  (of which 'spacing' is said to be 'the fundamental property' 2) and deconstruction (with one of Derrida's last major texts, Le Toucher: Jean-Luc Nancy , specifying 'spacing ' to be 'the first word of any deconstruction' 3)."

1  Jacques Derrida, “La Différance,” in Marges – de la philosophie  (Paris: Minuit, 1972), p. 14. Henceforth cited as  D  .

2  Jacques Derrida, “Freud and the Scene of Writing,” trans. A. Bass, in Writing and  Difference  (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1978), p. 217. Henceforth cited as FSW .

3  Jacques Derrida, Le Toucher, Jean-Luc Nancy  (Paris: Galilée, 2000), p. 207.

. . . .

"… a particularly interesting point is made in this respect by the French philosopher, Michel Haar. After remarking that the force Derrida attributes to différance  consists simply of the series of its effects, and is, for this reason, 'an indefinite process of substitutions or permutations,' Haar specifies that, for this process to be something other than a simple 'actualisation' lacking any real power of effectivity, it would need “a soubassement porteur ' – let’s say a 'conducting underlay' or 'conducting medium' which would not, however, be an absolute base, nor an 'origin' or 'cause.' If then, as Haar concludes, différance  and spacing show themselves to belong to 'a pure Apollonism' 'haunted by the groundless ground,' which they lack and deprive themselves of,16 we can better understand both the threat posed by the 'figures' of space and the mother in the Timaeus  and, as a result, Derrida’s insistent attempts to disqualify them. So great, it would seem, is the menace to différance  that Derrida must, in a 'properly' apotropaic  gesture, ward off these 'figures' of an archaic, chthonic, spatial matrix in any and all ways possible…."

16  Michel Haar, “Le jeu de Nietzsche dans Derrida,” Revue philosophique de la France et de l’Etranger  2 (1990): 207-227.

. . . .

… "The conclusion to be drawn from Democritus' conception of rhuthmos , as well as from Plato's conception of the chôra , is not, therefore, as Derrida would have it, that a differential field understood as an originary site of inscription would 'produce' the spatiality of space but, on the contrary, that 'differentiation in general' depends upon a certain 'spatial milieu' – what Haar would name a 'groundless ground' – revealed as such to be an 'in-between' more 'originary' than the play of differences it in-forms. As such, this conclusion obviously extends beyond Derrida's conception of 'spacing,' encompassing contemporary philosophy's continual privileging of temporization in its elaboration of a pre-ontological 'opening' – or, shall we say, 'in-between.'

For permutations and a possible "groundless ground," see
the eightfold cube and group actions both on a set of eight
building blocks arranged in a cube (a "conducting base") and
on the set of seven natural interstices (espacements )  between
the blocks. Such group actions provide an elementary picture of
the isomorphism between the groups PSL(2,7) (acting on the
eight blocks) and GL(3,2) (acting on the seven interstices).

Espacements
 

For the Church of Synchronology

See also, from the reported publication date of the above book
Intermedialities , the Log24 post Synchronicity.

Sunday, March 24, 2019

Espacement: Geometry of the Interstice in Literary Theory

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 3:28 AM

"You said something about the significance of spaces between
elements being repeated. Not only the element itself being repeated,
but the space between. I'm very interested in the space between.
That is where we come together." — Peter Eisenman, 1982

https://www.parrhesiajournal.org/
parrhesia03/parrhesia03_blackburne.pdf

Parrhesia  No. 3 • 2007 • 22–32

(Up) Against the (In) Between: Interstitial Spatiality
in Genet and Derrida

by Clare Blackburne

Blackburne — www.parrhesiajournal.org 24 —

"The excessive notion of espacement  as the resurgent spatiality of that which is supposedly ‘without space’ (most notably, writing), alerts us to the highly dynamic nature of the interstice – a movement whose discontinuous and ‘aberrant’ nature requires further analysis."

Blackburne — www.parrhesiajournal.org 25 —

"Espacement  also evokes the ambiguous figure of the interstice, and is related to the equally complex derridean notions of chora , différance , the trace and the supplement. Derrida’s reading of the Platonic chora  in Chora L Works  (a series of discussions with the architect Peter Eisenman) as something which defies the logics of non-contradiction and binarity, implies the internal heterogeneity and instability of all structures, neither ‘sensible’ nor ‘intelligible’ but a third genus which escapes conceptual capture.25 Crucially, chora , spacing, dissemination and différance  are highly dynamic concepts, involving hybridity, an ongoing ‘corruption’ of categories, and a ‘bastard reasoning.’26 Derrida identification of différance  in Margins of  Philosophy , as an ‘unappropriable excess’ that operates through spacing as ‘the becoming-space of time or the becoming-time of space,’27 chimes with his description of chora  as an ‘unidentifiable excess’ that is ‘the spacing which is the condition for everything to take place,’ opening up the interval as the plurivocity of writing in defiance of ‘origin’ and ‘essence.’28  In this unfolding of différance , spacing  ‘insinuates  into  presence an  interval,’29 again alerting us to the crucial role of the interstice in deconstruction, and, as Derrida observes  in Positions ,  its  impact  as  ‘a movement,  a  displacement  that  indicates  an  irreducible alterity’: ‘Spacing is the impossibility for an identity to be closed on itself, on the inside of its proper interiority, or on its coincidence with itself. The irreducibility of spacing is the irreducibility of the other.’30"

25. Quoted in Jeffrey Kipnis and Thomas Leeser, eds., 
Chora L Works. Jacques Derrida and Peter Eisenman  
(New York: The Monacelli Press, 1997), 15.

26. Ibid, 25.

27. Derrida, Margins of Philosophy.
(Brighton: The Harvester Press, 1982), 6 and 13.

28. Derrida, Chora L Works , 19 and 10.

29. Ibid, 203.

30. Derrida, Positions , 94.

Saturday, March 23, 2019

Another Typology

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:04 AM

"You said something about the significance of spaces between
elements being repeated. Not only the element itself being repeated,
but the space between. I'm very interested in the space between.
That is where we come together." — Peter Eisenman, 1982

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Geometry of Interstices

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 10:18 PM

Finite Galois geometry with the underlying field the simplest one possible —
namely, the two-element field GF(2) — is a geometry of  interstices :

For some less precise remarks, see the tags Interstice and Interality.

The rationalist motto "sincerity, order, logic and clarity" was quoted
by Charles Jencks in the previous post.

This  post was suggested by some remarks from Queensland that
seem to exemplify these qualities —

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

The Eightfold Cube and PSL(2,7)

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:45 PM

For PSL(2,7), this is ((49-1)(49-7))/((7-1)(2))=168.

The group GL(3,2), also of order 168, acts naturally
on the set of seven cube-slicings below —

Another way to picture the seven natural slicings —

Application of the above images to picturing the
isomorphism of PSL(2,7) with GL(3,2) —

Why PSL(2,7) is isomorphic to GL(3.2)

For a more detailed proof, see . . .

Saturday, September 29, 2018

“Ikonologie des Zwischenraums”

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:29 AM

The title is from Warburg. The Zwischenraum  lines and shaded "cuts"
below are to be added together in characteristic two, i.e., via the
set-theoretic symmetric difference  operator.

Some small Galois spaces (the Cullinane models)

Saturday, September 15, 2018

Eidetic Reduction in Geometry

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:23 AM
 

"Husserl is not the greatest philosopher of all times.
He is the greatest philosopher since Leibniz."

Kurt Gödel as quoted by Gian-Carlo Rota

Some results from a Google search —

Eidetic reduction | philosophy | Britannica.com

Eidetic reduction, in phenomenology, a method by which the philosopher moves from the consciousness of individual and concrete objects to the transempirical realm of pure essences and thus achieves an intuition of the eidos (Greek: “shape”) of a thing—i.e., of what it is in its invariable and essential structure, apart …

Phenomenology Online » Eidetic Reduction

The eidetic reduction: eidos. Method: Bracket all incidental meaning and ask: what are some of the possible invariate aspects of this experience? The research …

Eidetic reduction – New World Encyclopedia

Sep 19, 2017 – Eidetic reduction is a technique in Husserlian phenomenology, used to identify the essential components of the given phenomenon or experience.

Terminology: Eidos

For example —

The reduction of two-colorings and four-colorings of a square or cubic
array of subsquares or subcubes to lines, sets of lines, cuts, or sets of
cuts between the subsquares or subcubes.

See the diamond theorem and the eightfold cube.

* Cf. posts tagged Interality and Interstice.

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Godard and Interality

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:14 AM

The previous post, "One Plus One," suggests some further
art-historical remarks on interality

From Third Text , 2013, Vol. 27, No. 6, pp. 774–785 —

"Genealogy of the Image in Histoire(s) du Cinéma : Godard, Warburg and the Iconology of the Interstice"

By Dimitrios S. Latsis

* * * * P. 775

My discussion will focus on the significance of the concept of the ‘space in-between,’ its importance for Godard’s work and its role in a relational historiography of images more broadly. I hope to corroborate how Godard functions as a twenty-first century archaeologist of the moving image, constructing a meta-cinematic collage that, while consisting of an indexing of (almost exclusively) pre-existing filmic samples, ends up becoming a hybrid work of art in its own right. Godard, in the final analysis, expands the Warburgian programme of iconology into that of a cinematographic iconology of the interstice.

* * * * P. 777

Godard conceives of the image only in the plural, in the intermediate space between two images, be it a prolonged one (in  Histoire(s)  there are frequent instances of black screens) or a non-existent one (superimposition, co-presence of two images on screen). He comments: ‘[For me] it’s always two, begin by showing two images rather than one, that’s what I call image, the one made up of two’ [18] and elsewhere, ‘I perceived . . . cinema is that which is between things, not things [themselves] but between one and another.’ [19]

18. Jean-Luc Godard and Youssef Ishaghpour, "Archéologie du cinéma et mémoire du siècle," Farrago ,Tours, 2000, p. 27. The title of this work is reflective of the Godardian agenda that permeates Histoire(s) .

19. Jean-Luc Godard, "Introduction à une véritable histoire du cinéma," Albatros , Paris,1980, p. 145

* * * * P. 783 —

If it is in ‘the in-between’ that thought is born, then for Godard cinematography as ‘a form that thinks  . . . was born with the advent of modern painting.’ [62]

62. Godard and Ishaghpour, op. cit., pp 45–46.

* * * * P. 785

Warburg commented on the signification of the black spaces that he placed between images in his analysis of the network of intervals in  Mnemosyne , by quoting Johann Wolfgang Goethe’s dictum ‘the truth inhabits the middle space.’ [68] This citation induces a feeling of déjà-vu for the viewer of Histoire(s). The link was not missed by Warburg himself, as one of his diary entries testifies: ‘We can compare this phenomenon [the iconology of the interval] to that of the cinematic montage, the domain of the interpretation is an intervallic one.’  [69]

68. Warburg,  Mnemosyne , pp 135–146.

69. Warburg is quoted in Didi-Huberman, L’image survivante, p. 503. (Georges Didi-Huberman, L’image survivante. Histoire de l’art et temps des fantômes selon Aby Warburg , Minuit, Paris, 2002)

Saturday, September 8, 2018

Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:26 PM

'Space' in Chinese

For example —

'Projective space' in Chinese

See also Interality in this journal.

Monday, July 23, 2018

Space 101

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:01 AM

From the April 1st publication date of "Interality Shows Through,"
by Geling Shang —

See too yesterday's post  Space.

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:29 AM


See also interality in the eightfold cube.

IMAGE- The Trinity Cube (three interpenetrating planes that split the eightfold cube into its eight subcubes)

Sunday, January 7, 2018

Clueless:

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Peter Zhang and Eric McLuhan on Interality

Space Program

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Or:  Interality Illustrated

See also Seven Seals.

Saturday, January 6, 2018

Report from Red Mountain

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Tom Wolfe in The Painted Word  (1975):

"It is important to repeat that Greenberg and Rosenberg
did not create their theories in a vacuum or simply turn up
with them one day like tablets brought down from atop
Green Mountain or Red Mountain (as B. H. Friedman once
called the two men). As tout le monde  understood, they
were not only theories but … hot news,
straight from the studios, from the scene."

Harold Rosenberg in The New Yorker  (click to enlarge)

See also Interality  and the Eightfold Cube .

Friday, January 5, 2018

Types of Ambiguity

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:56 AM

From "The Principle of Sufficient Reason," by George David Birkhoff
in "Three Public Lectures on Scientific Subjects,"
delivered at the Rice Institute, March 6, 7, and 8, 1940 —

From the same lecture —

Up to the present point my aim has been to consider a variety of applications of the Principle of Sufficient Reason, without attempting any precise formulation of the Principle itself. With these applications in mind I will venture to formulate the Principle and a related Heuristic Conjecture in quasi-mathematical form as follows:

PRINCIPLE OF SUFFICIENT REASON. If there appears in any theory T a set of ambiguously  determined ( i e . symmetrically entering) variables, then these variables can themselves be determined only to the extent allowed by the corresponding group G. Consequently any problem concerning these variables which has a uniquely determined solution, must itself be formulated so as to be unchanged by the operations of the group G ( i e . must involve the variables symmetrically).

HEURISTIC CONJECTURE. The final form of any scientific theory T is: (1) based on a few simple postulates; and (2) contains an extensive ambiguity, associated symmetry, and underlying group G, in such wise that, if the language and laws of the theory of groups be taken for granted, the whole theory T appears as nearly self-evident in virtue of the above Principle.

The Principle of Sufficient Reason and the Heuristic Conjecture, as just formulated, have the advantage of not involving excessively subjective ideas, while at the same time retaining the essential kernel of the matter.

In my opinion it is essentially this principle and this conjecture which are destined always to operate as the basic criteria for the scientist in extending our knowledge and understanding of the world.

It is also my belief that, in so far as there is anything definite in the realm of Metaphysics, it will consist in further applications of the same general type. This general conclusion may be given the following suggestive symbolic form:

Image-- Birkhoff diagram relating Galois's theory of ambiguity to metaphysics

While the skillful metaphysical use of the Principle must always be regarded as of dubious logical status, nevertheless I believe it will remain the most important weapon of the philosopher.

Related remarks by a founding member of the Metaphysical Club:

See also the previous post, "Seven Types of Interality."

Seven Types of Interality*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 AM

* See the term interality  in this journal.
For many synonyms, see 
"The Human Seriousness of Interality,"
by Peter Zhang, Grand Valley State University,
China Media Research  11(2), 2015, 93-103.

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Perspectives from a Chinese Jar

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:40 PM

" . . . Only by the form, the pattern,
Can words or music reach
The stillness, as a Chinese jar still
Moves perpetually in its stillness."

— T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets

"The Grand Valley spirit never dies."

— Adapted from the Tao Te Ching

Monday, January 16, 2017

Interality Illustrated

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:18 AM

For the "interality" of the title, click on the tag.

Click the above image for posts tagged "The Positive."

Sunday, January 15, 2017

Interality

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:48 PM

See also previous posts now tagged with this term.

April First Interality

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Data for an essay titled "Interality in Heidegger" —

See also Log24 posts
on that same date —
April 1, 2015.

Saturday, January 14, 2017

The Thing and I

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 PM

Continued.

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Changes

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Despite a remark at ichingpsychics.com, the I Ching's underlying group actually has 1,290,157,424,640 permutations.

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