Log24

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Die Cast

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:11 PM

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

The Die is Cast

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:31 AM

Meditation for the Ides of March—

IMAGE- Grateful Dead logo based on a concept by Owsley Stanley

   Only connect.

Sunday, January 17, 2021

The Miscast Spell

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:34 PM

See Spectre and Spectral in this journal.

Details —  “California Health Care Facility inmate Phillip Spector, 80,
was pronounced deceased of natural causes at 6:35 p.m. [California time]
on Saturday, January 16, 2021, at an outside hospital. His official cause of
death will be determined by the medical examiner in the San Joaquin
County Sheriff’s Office.”
— California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

Saturday, August 8, 2020

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

In memory of Wilford Brimley:

“The polymorphic Thing, capable of absorbing the human
as but one among other morphological possibilities in its
seemingly infinite repertoire, can be understood, that is,
as the embodiment of evolution.”

— Eric White,  Science Fiction Studies  #61  (Vol. 20, Part 3, Nov. 1993),
The Erotics of Becoming: XENOGENESIS and The Thing

Friday, June 12, 2020

Bullshit Studies: “Hyperseeing”

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:13 AM

In memoriam —

Friedman co-edited the ISAMA journal  Hyperseeing .  See also . . .

See too the other articles in Volume 40 of  Kybernetes .

Related material —

Compare and contrast the discussion of the geometry
of the 4×4 square
in the diamond theorem (1976) with
Nat Friedman’s treatment of the same topic in 2001 —

Saturday, May 16, 2020

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:59 PM

From https://www.mathunion.org/outreach/logos/versions-all-logos

Click the logo for some IMU history.

Related bullshit —

Hegel’s Conceptual Group Action

Click the banner below for the background of the logo

Friday, May 1, 2020

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 2:55 PM

The following passage is from Amanda Gefter’s  Trespassing
on Einstein’s Lawn  (Bantam Books, 2014).

“You know the story of Plato’s cave?” my father asked. “All the prisoners are chained up in the cave and they can’t see the real world outside, only the shadows on the wall? That’s supposed to be a negative thing, like they’ll never know reality. But the truth is, you have to be stuck inside a limited reference frame for there to be any reality at all! If you weren’t chained to your light cone, you’d see nothing. The H-state.”

I nodded. “You’d have no information. You need the broken symmetry, the shadow, to have information and information gives rise to the world. It from bit.”

I couldn’t help but grin with excitement. The message was clear: having a finite frame of reference creates the illusion of a world, but even the reference frame itself is an illusion. Observers create reality, but observers aren’t real. There is nothing ontologically distinct about an observer, because you can always find a frame in which that observer disappears: the frame of the frame itself, the boundary of the boundary.

“If physicists discover an invariant someday, the game will be up,” my father mused. “That would rule out the hypothesis that the universe is really nothing.”

That was true. But so far, at least, every last invariant had gone the way of space and time, rendered relative and observer-dependent. Spacetime, gravity, electromagnetism, the nuclear forces, mass, energy, momentum, angular momentum, charge, dimensions, particles, fields, the vacuum, strings, the universe, the multiverse, the speed of light— one by one they had been downgraded to illusion. As the surface appearance of reality fell away, only one thing remained. Nothing.

My path to Gefter’s father’s musing led from a quotation attributed,
probably falsely, to John Archibald Wheeler on page 52 of Octavio
Paz’s  Claude Lévi-Strauss: An Introduction  (Cornell, 1970)

“There is a point at which

‘something is nothing and nothing is something.’

The quote may actually be by AP writer John Barbour reporting
on a 1967 American Physical Society talk by Wheeler, “The End
of Time.”

Gefter mentions Wheeler 369 times:

See as well Introduction to Quantum Woo.

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Mage Studies: Art vs. Bullshit

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:32 PM

Art:

From an October 3 post

Bullshit:

From an academic's website —

Friday, September 8, 2017

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 AM

Or:  Nine, Eight, Seven . . .

See as well
Rainbow Countdown.

Sunday, May 28, 2017

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:24 PM

The previous post dealt with a symbol of an apparently
admirable "social development environment."

For a less admirable development environment, see a film
described in a July 2014 story from Film New Europe —

"Shooting started in Bucharest on 9 June 2014. . . ."

This  journal on 8-9 June 2014 —

Monday, April 10, 2017

Bullshit Studies Continued*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:29 PM

Yin Yang Yung

* See also earlier posts on Bullshit Studies.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:19 AM

From The Chronicle of Higher Education  on March 2, 2017 —

These days, in a world totally dependent on microprocessors, lasers, and nanotechnology, it has been estimated that 30 percent of the U.S. gross national product is based on inventions made possible by quantum mechanics. With the booming high-tech industry and the expected advent of quantum computers, this percentage will only grow. Within a hundred years, an esoteric theory of young physicists became a mainstay of the modern economy.

It took nearly as long for Einstein’s own theory of relativity, first published in 1905, to be used in everyday life in an entirely unexpected way. The accuracy of the global positioning system, the space-based navigation system that provides location and time information in today’s mobile society, depends on reading time signals of orbiting satellites. The presence of Earth’s gravitational field and the movement of these satellites cause clocks to speed up and slow down, shifting them by 38 milliseconds a day. In one day, without Einstein’s theory, our GPS tracking devices would be inaccurate by about seven miles.

Robbert Dijkgraaf, Director, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

The above paragraphs are clearly propaganda, not physics.

For "It has been estimated," see

The "without Einstein 's theory" statement may or may not be correct.
See the lengthy discussion at

http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/1061/
why-does-gps-depend-on-relativity
.

See also Princeton's March of Mediocrity Continues.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:21 PM

Continued.

" The origin of new ways of doing things may often be
a disciplinary crisis. The definition of such a crisis
provided by Barry Mazur in Mykonos (2005) applies
equally well to literary creation. '[A crisis occurs] when
some established overarching framework, theoretical
vocabulary or procedure of thought is perceived as
inadequate in an essential way, or not meaning
what we think it means.' "

— Circles Disturbed :
The Interplay of Mathematics and Narrative

Edited by Apostolos Doxiadis & Barry Mazur
Princeton University Press, 2012. See
Chapter 14, Section 5.1, by Uri Margolin.

See also "overarching" in this journal.

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Cast

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:14 PM

"La morte è avvenuta alle 22.30 di ieri sera nella sua abitazione."
— http://www.repubblica.it/cultura/2016/02/20/news/
morto_lo_scrittore_umberto_eco-133816061/

See also the previous post, "Radical."

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:00 PM

(Continued)

Click image to enlarge.

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:30 AM

(Continued)

"The allusion to 'the most precious square of sense' shows
Shakespeare doing an almost scholastic demonstration of
the need for a ratio and interplay among the senses as
the very constitution of rationality."

— Marshall McLuhan, The Gutenberg Galaxy ,
University of Toronto Press, 1962, page 13

"What Shakespeare refers to in Lear  as the 'precious
square of sense' probably has reference to the traditional
'square of opposition' in logic and to that four-part analogy
of proportionality which is the interplay of sense and reason."     

— McLuhan, ibid. , page 241

This is of course nonsense, and, in view of McLuhan's pose
as a defender of the Catholic faith, damned  nonsense.

Epigraph by McLuhan —

"The Gutenberg Galaxy  develops a mosaic or field
approach to its problems."

I prefer a different "mosaic or field" related to the movable
blocks  of Fröbel, not the movable type  of Gutenberg.

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 1:06 AM

The originator of the phrase 'Fab Four' reportedly
died at 80 on Saturday, May 14, 2016.

This suggests a review of another noted four-set.

The above image is from a study of Lévi-Strauss's "Canonical Formula"

Midrash —

Log24 post titled 'As Is'

[Above photo of Lévi-Strauss and formula added June 6, 2016.]

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Cast

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 PM

  Click on the die for some backstory.

Saturday, May 2, 2015

Die Scheinung

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:00 PM

See also Die Scheinung  in this journal.

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Die Scheinung des Wesens

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:00 AM

… und Nachtformen des Urgrundes

From George , by Friedrich Gundolf (Berlin, Bondi, 1920):

Wenn das Schlußgedicht des Teppichs "Der Schleier"
das ganze gestaltige "Leben" des Dichters als
einen Traum-nu des Geistes zeigt so ist damit
der Geistestag vollbracht und der Geist selbst
der dies vermag ist am Ende seiner Herrschaft
er steht vor dem Urgrund der ihn bewegt:
er erkennt sich selbst wenn nicht als Stoff
so doch als Kraft zu träumen. Die kosmische Nacht
in die er blickt ist zugleich Widerspiel des Gestaltenreiches
das er als Geist der Erde verwirk licht
und Widerspiel des Gesetzes das er als Geist des Lebens
verewigt kurz sie ist Traum und Tod "Traum"
nicht als die Fülle der Gesichte sondern als "Maja"
die Scheinung des Wesens vermöge
deren der Urgrund sich der Bindung im Raum immer wieder entzieht
wie er im Tod der Bindung durch die Zeit entgeht.
Traum ist die Aufhebung des Raum-Ichs,
Tod die Aufhebung des Zeit-Ichs— beides sind
Nachtformen des Urgrundes
die raumschaffende und -vernichtende Bewegung und
das zeitschaffende und -vernichtende Sein.

The original:

IMAGE- A passage from 'George,' by Friedrich Gundolf (Berlin, 1920)

Related material:  Die Scheinung  in this journal.

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Bullshit Studies

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:12 PM

The essay excerpted in last night's post on structuralism
is of value as part of a sustained attack by the late
Robert de Marrais on the damned nonsense of the late
French literary theorist Jacques Derrida—

Catastrophes, Kaleidoscopes, String Quartets:
Deploying the Glass Bead Game

Part I:  Ministrations Concerning Silliness, or:
Is “Interdisciplinary Thought” an Oxymoron?

Part II:  Canonical Collage-oscopes, or:
Claude in Jacques’ Trap?  Not What It Sounds Like!

Part III:  Grooving on the Sly with Klein Groups

Part IV:  Claude’s Kaleidoscope . . . and Carl’s

Part V:  Spelling the Tree, from Aleph to Tav
(While  Not Forgetting to Shin)

The response of de Marrais to Derrida's oeuvre  nicely
exemplifies the maxim of Norman Mailer that

"At times, bullshit can only be countered
with superior bullshit."

Saturday, August 24, 2013

Cast (continued)

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:31 AM

The death yesterday of British cinematographer
Gilbert Taylor suggests an image from last evening's
Log24 search Point Omega —

.

The die in the above image (shown here Dec. 28, 2012
displays the numbers 3-6-5 in counterclockwise order.
A similar die in an earlier post served as a metaphor for
a time-jump to 365 days in the past.

For some religious remarks by Umberto Eco that may
serve as a small memorial to Taylor, see this journal 
a year before  the day he died— August 23, 2012.

"Everybody comes to Rick's."

Thursday, December 27, 2012

Cast

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

IMAGE- 'Inception' totems: red die and chess bishop, with Inception 'Point Man' poster

Note that the visible faces of the die, in counter -clockwise
order, are 3 6 5. See also this journal 365 days ago and,
since 2012 is a leap year, also today's date last year.

Saturday, August 20, 2011

Castle Rock

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:29 PM

Happy birthday to Amy Adams
(actress from Castle Rock, Colorado)

"The metaphor for metamorphosis…" —Endgame

Related material:

"The idea that reality consists of multiple 'levels,' each mirroring all others in some fashion, is a diagnostic feature of premodern cosmologies in general…."

Scholarly paper on "Correlative Cosmologies"

"How many layers are there to human thought? Sometimes in art, just as in people’s conversations, we’re aware of only one at a time. On other occasions, though, we realize just how many layers can be in simultaneous action, and we’re given a sense of both revelation and mystery. When a choreographer responds to music— when one artist reacts in detail to another— the sensation of multilayering can affect us as an insight not just into dance but into the regions of the mind.

The triple bill by the Mark Morris Dance Group at the Rose Theater, presented on Thursday night as part of the Mostly Mozart Festival, moves from simple to complex, and from plain entertainment to an astonishingly beautiful and intricate demonstration of genius….

'Socrates' (2010), which closed the program, is a calm and objective work that has no special dance excitement and whips up no vehement audience reaction. Its beauty, however, is extraordinary. It’s possible to trace in it terms of arithmetic, geometry, dualism, epistemology and ontology, and it acts as a demonstration of art and as a reflection of life, philosophy and death."

— Alastair Macaulay in today's New York Times

SOCRATES: Let us turn off the road a little….

Libretto for Mark Morris's 'Socrates'

See also Amy Adams's new film "On the Road"
in a story from Aug. 5, 2010 as well as a different story,
Eightgate, from that same date:

A 2x4 array of squares

The above reference to "metamorphosis" may be seen,
if one likes, as a reference to the group of all projectivities
and correlations in the finite projective space PG(3,2)—
a group isomorphic to the 40,320 transformations of S8
acting on the above eight-part figure.

See also The Moore Correspondence from last year
on today's date, August 20.

For some background, see a book by Peter J. Cameron,
who has figured in several recent Log24 posts—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110820-Parallelisms60.jpg

"At the still point, there the dance is."
               — Four Quartets

Thursday, December 3, 2020

Unframed Prime

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 PM

A Veritable Frame

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:21 PM

A search in this journal for “Jean Brodie” suggests a review —

“A professor is all-powerful, Gareth liked to tell his daughter, he puts
‘a veritable frame around life,’ and ‘organizes the unorganizable.
Nimbly partitions it . . . .'”

Review of Special Topics in Calamity Physics , Aug. 13, 2006

Thursday, October 1, 2020

Annals of Academia

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:21 PM

New York  magazine’s “The Cut” —

BAD SCIENCE
JULY 14, 2016

Why It Took Social Science Years to Correct a Simple Error
About ‘Psychoticism’

By Jesse Singal

“What should we make of all of this? Partly, of course, this is
a story of conflicting personalities, of competitiveness between
researchers, of academics acting — let’s be frank — like dicks.”

Or, worse, like New York Times  reporter Benedict Carey —

A Theory About Conspiracy Theories

In a new study, psychologists tried to get a handle on the personality types that might be prone to outlandish beliefs.

By Benedict Carey, New York Times  science reporter,
on Sept. 28, 2020

. . . .

The personality features that were solidly linked to conspiracy beliefs included some usual suspects: entitlement, self-centered impulsivity, cold-heartedness (the confident injustice collector), elevated levels of depressive moods and anxiousness (the moody figure, confined by age or circumstance). Another one emerged from the questionnaire that aimed to assess personality disorders — a pattern of thinking called “psychoticism.”

Psychoticism is a core feature of so-called schizo-typal personality disorder, characterized in part by “odd beliefs and magical thinking” and “paranoid ideation.” In the language of psychiatry, it is a milder form of full-blown psychosis, the recurrent delusional state that characterizes schizophrenia. It’s a pattern of magical thinking that goes well beyond garden variety superstition and usually comes across socially as disjointed, uncanny or “off.”

In time, perhaps some scientist or therapist will try to slap a diagnosis on believers in Big Lie conspiracies that seem wildly out of line with reality. For now, Dr. Pennycook said, it is enough to know that, when distracted, people are far more likely to forward headlines and stories without vetting their sources much, if at all.
. . . .

Some elementary  fact-checking reveals that historical definitions
of “psychoticism” vary greatly. Carey forwards this bullshit without
vetting his sources much, if at all.

Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Vanity Fair Cover Girl

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:15 AM

Elle Fanning recently played Catherine the Great.

Starring J. J. Abrams as Leonhard Euler?

Thursday, September 17, 2020

Structure and Mutability . . .

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 9:51 PM

Continues in The New York Times :

“One day — ‘I don’t know exactly why,’ he writes — he tried to
put together eight cubes so that they could stick together but
also move around, exchanging places. He made the cubes out
of wood, then drilled a hole in the corners of the cubes to link
them together. The object quickly fell apart.

Many iterations later, Rubik figured out the unique design
that allowed him to build something paradoxical:
a solid, static object that is also fluid….” — Alexandra Alter

Another such object: the eightfold cube .

Nexus

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:32 AM

“This article is a nexus of ideas and vision….”

— Jack Plotkin at Medium.com yesterday

As are many other things. See nexus  in this  journal
and . . .

“Show me all  the blueprints.”

— Howard Hughes, according to Hollywood

Monday, August 17, 2020

Art School Confidential . . .

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:13 PM

Continues.

See also  Obelisk  in this journal.

Saturday, August 15, 2020

Lives of the Painters: Dutch Boy

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:32 PM

“Harry decides his chief peacetime duty is to use his
gift for gab to further his ‘overriding purpose,’ namely:
‘By recalling the past and freezing the present he could
open the gates of time and through them see all
allegedly sequential things as a single masterwork
with neither boundaries nor divisions.’ Once he opens
these gates, Harry will flood his audience with his
redemptive epiphanic impression that ‘the world was
saturated with love.’ ”

— Liesl Schillinger, review of Mark Helprin’s novel
In Sunlight and in Shadow  in The New York Times ,
Oct. 5, 2012

Tuesday, July 14, 2020

The Sextet Enigma

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:27 PM

In memory of . . .

“Helene Lovie Aldwinckle,
codebreaker, broadcaster and gallerist,
born 26 October 1920; died 24 April 2020″ —

Other posts now also tagged The Cologne Sextet.

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Tune for a Dark Corner

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:59 AM

“Like the castle in the corner
In a medieval game”

Steely Dan, Dirty Work, 1972

Saturday, April 25, 2020

The Grandfather Clock

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:16 PM

“Well, I’ve helped to wind up the clock —
I might as well hear it strike!”

— Said to be a quotation from the grandfather
of a “pirate radio” founder who reportedly died
at 79 on April 20.

See as well this journal on the night of April 20 —

Wheel Turnin’ ’Round and ’Round

and a search for “Wheel of Time.”

Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Game

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:34 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180903-Womens_Night_Bingo-at48.41-The_Net.jpg

Another game featured in the above film —

“In Wolfenstein 3D , the player assumes the role of an American
soldier of Polish descent attempting to escape from the Nazi
stronghold of Castle Wolfenstein.” — Wikipedia

  

See also this  journal’s Wolfenstein.

Thursday, November 14, 2019

Lit for Brats

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 8:36 AM

From a search in this journal for Salinger

“… the wind was noisy the way it is in spooky movies
on the night the old slob with the will gets murdered.”

— From the opening sentence of the first Holden Caulfield
story, published in the Collier’s  of December 22, 1945

See as well the previous post.

Game

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:18 AM

Rules for a game codesigned by Ellie Black, the cartoonist
of yesterday's post Cutting-Edge Prize

Gropius Moritat…

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:00 AM

Continued from other posts so tagged.

"Was ist Raum, wie können wir ihn
 erfassen und gestalten?"

Walter Gropius,

Another approach to changing the game

See also a search here  for a phrase related to 
last night's Country Music Association awards 
speech by Reba McEntire — "Rule the World."

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Sein Feld

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:25 PM

Cutting-Edge Prize

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:51 PM

From November 13, 2005 —

Detail from a Log24 post of September 23, 2019

Cartoon by Ellie Black in The New Yorker , uploaded there on the above date.

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

The Panhandle Project

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 AM

"When they all finally reach their destination —
a deserted field in the Florida Panhandle…." 

" When asked about the film's similarities to the 2015 Disney movie 
Tomorrowland , which also posits a futuristic world that exists in an
alternative dimension
, Nichols sighed. 'I was a little bummed, I guess,'
he said of when he first learned about the project. . . . 'Our die was cast.
Sometimes this kind of collective unconscious that we're all dabbling in,
sometimes you're not the first one out of the gate.' "

Saturday, June 1, 2019

Crystals for Dabblers

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:47 AM

The title was suggested by the "Crystal Cult" installations
of Oslo artist Josefine Lyche and by a post of May 30 —

Thursday, May 30, 2019

Dabbling

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:02 PM Edit This

Jeff Nichols, director of Midnight Special  (2016) —

"When asked about the film's similarities to
the 2015 Disney movie Tomorrowland , which
also posits a futuristic world that exists in an
alternative dimension, Nichols sighed.
'I was a little bummed, I guess,' he said of
when he first learned about the project. . . . 
'Our die was castSometimes this kind of 
collective unconscious that we're all dabbling in,
sometimes you're not the first one out of the gate.' "

See also Jung's four-diamond figure and the previous post.

Writers of fiction are, of course, also dabblers in the collective unconscious.
For instance . . .

A 1971 British paperback edition of The Dreaming Jewels,  
a story by Theodore Sturgeon (first version published in 1950):

The above book cover, together with the Death Valley location
Zabriskie Point, suggests . . .

Those less enchanted by the collective unconscious may prefer a
different weblog's remarks on the same date as the above Borax post . . .

Thursday, May 30, 2019

Dabbling

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:02 PM

Jeff Nichols, director of Midnight Special  (2016) —

"When asked about the film's similarities to the 2015 Disney
movie Tomorrowland , which also posits a futuristic world
that exists in an alternative dimension, Nichols sighed.
'I was a little bummed, I guess,' he said of when he first
learned about the project. . . . 'Our die was cast.
Sometimes this kind of collective unconscious that
we're all dabbling in, sometimes you're not the first one
out of the gate.' "

See also Jung's four-diamond figure and the previous post.

Sunday, May 26, 2019

Burning Bright

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Gell-Mann's 'eightfold way' as 'a mosaic of simple triangular building blocks' — George Johnson, 1999

Compare and contrast with . . .

The Brightburn Logo:

Related material from the May 12 post

"The Collective Unconscious
in a Cartoon Graveyard
" —

"When they all finally reach their destination —
a deserted field in the Florida Panhandle…." 

" When asked about the film's similarities to the 2015 Disney movie Tomorrowland , which also posits a futuristic world that exists in an alternative dimension, Nichols sighed. 'I was a little bummed, I guess,' he said of when he first learned about the project. . . . 'Our die was cast. Sometimes this kind of collective unconscious that we're all dabbling in, sometimes you're not the first one out of the gate.' "

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Hunger Games

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:26 PM

Two items from November 24, 2015 —

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Tools

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:11 PM 

In memory of economic historian Douglass C. North,
who reportedly died Monday, Nov. 23, 2015 —

We needed new tools, but they simply did not exist.”

Related reading and viewing —

Beattyville, Kentucky and Log24 post About the People.

Related material —

David Bowie and Catherine Deneuve star in 'The Hunger' (1983).

 David Bowie and Catherine Deneuve star in "The Hunger" (1983).

Vampira and Loki at Cannes

Sunday, May 12, 2019

The Collective Unconscious in a Cartoon Graveyard

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 PM

Tobey Maguire and Kirsten Dunst
in "Spider-Man 2" (2004) —

Spoilers for another Kirsten Dunst film,
"Midnight Special" (2016) —

"When they all finally reach their destination —
a deserted field in the Florida Panhandle…." 

" When asked about the film's similarities to the 2015 Disney movie 
Tomorrowland , which also posits a futuristic world that exists in an
alternative dimension
, Nichols sighed. 'I was a little bummed, I guess,'
he said of when he first learned about the project. . . . 'Our die was cast.
Sometimes this kind of collective unconscious that we're all dabbling in,
sometimes you're not the first one out of the gate.' "

From another obituary for
the "Spider-Man" screenwriter —

“When I die,” he liked to say, “I’m going to have written
on my tombstone, ‘Finally, a plot!’”

— Robert D. McFadden in The New York Times

Monday, November 12, 2018

Half Crazy

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:42 PM

Douglas Rain, the voice of HAL in Kubrick's 2001 , reportedly
died at 90 on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018. A piece from the Sunday,
April 1, 2018, print  edition of The New York Times  recalls that . . .

When HAL says, “I know I’ve made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal,” Mr. Rain somehow manages to sound both sincere and not reassuring. And his delivery of the line “I think you know what the problem is just as well as I do” has the sarcastic drip of a drawing-room melodrama and also carries the disinterested vibe of a polite sociopath.

Kubrick had Mr. Rain sing the 1892 love song “Daisy Bell” (“I’m half crazy, all for the love of you”) almost 50 times, in uneven tempos, in monotone, at different pitches and even just by humming it. In the end, he used the very first take. Sung as HAL’s brain is being disconnected, it’s from his early programming days, his computer childhood. It brings to an end the most affecting scene in the entire film.

— Gerry Flahive in the online New York Times 
 

"A version of this article appears in print on , on Page AR13 of the New York edition with the headline: HAL 9000 Wasn’t Always So Eerily Calm."

This  journal on the above online date, March 30, 2018 —

"Program or be programmed."
— A saying by Douglas Rushkoff

See as well the following link from this journal
on Armistice Day, the reported date of Mr. Rain's death —

"Halmos + Tombstone."

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

In Memoriam:

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:49 AM

Denis Mostyn Norden, writer, broadcaster and television presenter,
born 6 February 1922; died 19 September 2018.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180919-The_Statue-IMDb.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180919-The_Statue-unwrapped.jpg

For Abraham Warburg —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180914-Warburg-Wikipedia.jpg

"Que cantaba el Rey David."

Monday, December 25, 2017

New Kids on a Block:

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:59 PM

A Midnight Special for Charles Wallace


Peter Block —

Old Kid on Peter Block —

See the remarks today of Harvard philosophy professor Sean D. Kelly
in The New York Times :

Alexander's "15 properties that create the wholeness and aliveness" —

This is the sort of bullshit that seems to go over well at Harvard.
See Christopher Alexander in this journal.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Core

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:01 PM

From the New York Times Wire  last night —

"Mr. Hefner styled himself as an emblem
of the sexual revolution."

From a Log24 post on September 23 —

A different emblem related to other remarks in the above Sept. 23 post

On the wall— A Galois-geometry 'inscape'

(On the wall — a Galois-geometry inscape .)

The Last Word

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 6:00 AM

Remarks suggested by the previous post

From Jeremy Biles, "Introduction: The Sacred Monster," in
Ecce Monstrum: Georges Bataille and the Sacrifice of Form

(Fordham University Press, 2007, page 3) —

Bataille’s insistent conjunction of the monstrous and the sacred is the subject of this book. Regarded by many as one of the most important thinkers of our time, and acknowledged as an important influence by such intellectuals as Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva, Maurice Blanchot, and Jacques Derrida, Bataille produced a corpus of wide-ranging writings bearing the monstrous marks of the affective and intellectual contradictions he also sought to produce in his readers. In the following chapters, I will specify some of the ways in which Bataille evokes monstrosity to elicit in himself and his audience an experience of simultaneous anguish and joy—an experience that he calls sacred. In particular, Bataille is fascinated with the ‘‘left-hand’’ sacred. In contradistinction to its lucent and form-conferring ‘‘right-hand’’ counterpart, the left-hand sacred is obscure and formless—not transcendent, pure, and beneficent, but dangerous, filthy, and morbid. This sinister, deadly aspect of the sacred is at once embodied in, and communicated by, the monster. As we will see, it is in beholding the monster that one might experience the combination of ecstasy and horror that characterizes Bataille ’s notion of the sacred.

The dual etymology of ‘‘monster’’ reveals that aspect of the sacred that enticed Bataille. According to one vein of etymological study, the Latin monstrum  derives from monstrare  (to show or display). The monster is that which appears before our eyes as a sign of sorts; it is a demonstration. But another tradition emphasizes a more ominous point. Deriving from monere  (to warn), the monster is a divine omen, a portent; it heralds something that yet remains unexpected, unforeseeable—as a sudden reversal of fortune. In the writings of Bataille, the monster functions as a monstrance, putting on display the sinister aspect of the sacred that Bataille sees as the key to a ‘‘sovereign’’ existence. But in doing so the monster presents us with a portent of something that we cannot precisely foresee, but something that, Bataille claims, can be paradoxically experienced in moments of simultaneous anguish and ecstasy: death.

See as well

(Order of news items transposed for aesthetic effect.)

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Badreads

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 6:11 AM

    See also a related Log24 post.

Saturday, September 23, 2017

The Turn of the Frame

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:19 AM

"With respect to the story's content, the frame thus acts
both as an inclusion of the exterior and as an exclusion
of the interior: it is a perturbation of the outside at the
very core of the story's inside, and as such, it is a blurring
of the very difference between inside and outside."

— Shoshana Felman on a Henry James story, p. 123 in
"Turning the Screw of Interpretation,"
Yale French Studies  No. 55/56 (1977), pp. 94-207.
Published by Yale University Press.

See also the previous post and The Galois Tesseract.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

The Zero Monstrance

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 6:00 AM

From "The Metaphysics of Entities," a post of Sept. 20, 2014 —

Anthony Lane in The New Yorker  on a 2013 film —

"The hero of 'The Zero Theorem' is a computer genius
called Qohen Leth (Christoph Waltz)…. He is the sole
resident of a derelict church, where, on a crucifix in front
of the altar, the head of Christ has been replaced by a
security camera. No prayers are ever said, and none are
answered."

Related dialogue from a 2008 film

Another view of the Zero Theorem derelict church —

Saturday, September 9, 2017

How It Works

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:48 PM

Del Toro and the History of Mathematics ,
Or:  Applied Bullshit Continues

 

For del Toro


 

For the history of mathematics —

Thursday, September 1, 2011

How It Works

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags:  — m759 @ 11:00 AM 

"Design is how it works." — Steven Jobs (See Symmetry and Design.)

"By far the most important structure in design theory is the Steiner system S(5, 8, 24)."
 — "Block Designs," by Andries E. Brouwer

. . . .

Friday, September 8, 2017

Applied Bullshit

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:08 PM

A page from a book suggested by the previous post

Another approach to "the midrash  of space" —

    

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Sunday School:

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:01 AM

Bullshit Studies  Continued

The remarks by Mikhail Gromov on neuroscience in his papers
cited in the previous post suggest some related remarks —

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Science Marches On

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Connoisseurs of bullshit who enjoyed the previous post
might also enjoy the following:

The previous two posts introduced Mazzola's noxious combination of 
category theory and Hegel. The current version (Rev. 254) of the above 
nLab "Science of Logic" article, though not by Mazzola, displays this
combination in its full hideous splendor.

Some posts in this  journal that might be viewed as leading up to 
the original Sept. 2, 2012, "Science of Logic" article are now tagged
Death Warmed Over.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Mystery Woman

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:45 AM

From a book review quoted here in yesterday’s post
of 12:41 PM ET, “Special Topics” —

“That teacher, Hannah Schneider, has the magnetism of
Miss Jean Brodie and the film-noir mystique of Lauren Bacall.
When Blue meets her, in a ‘Hitchcock cameo,’ by the frozen-food
section at a grocery store, she falls under her spell. ‘She had an
elegant sort of romantic, bone-sculpted face, one that took well to
both shadows and light,’ Blue recalls. ‘Most extraordinary though
was the air of a Chateau Marmont bungalow about her, a sense
of RKO, which I’d never before witnessed in person.’ Hannah
teaches a course on cinema in a room lined with posters . . . .

From a Facebook page related to the death yesterday morning at
Webster University of the teacher of a course on cinema —

“I need a photo opportunity . . . .” — Paul Simon

The title of the film in the cover photo above is not without relevance.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

In Nuce

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 3:48 AM
 

Excerpts from James C. Nohrnberg, "The Master of the Myth of Literature: An Interpenetrative Ogdoad for Northrop Frye," Comparative Literature  Vol. 53, No. 1 (Winter, 2001), pp. 58-82

From page 58 —
"… the posthumously revealed Notebooks. A major project of the latter was his 'Ogdoad': two groups of four books each. '[T]he second group of four […] were considered to be Blakean "emanations" or counterparts of the first four,' like 'the "double mirror" structure of The Great Code  and Words with Power : two inter-reflecting parts of four chapters apiece,' Michael Dolzani reports.* "

* P. 22 of Rereading Frye: The Published and Unpublished Works , ed. David Boyd and Imre Salusinszky, Frye Studies [series] (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1998). [Abbreviated as RF .]


From page 62 —
"Visionaries like Blake and dramatists like Wagner seem to be working from some larger, mythic blueprint present in nuce  from very early on."

From page 63 —
"Frye's hypothetical books and will-to-totality were obviously fruitful; if the beckoning star was illusory, it nonetheless settled on a real birthplace. The sought-for constructs substituted their scaffolding for a backbone-like confidence in pre-given beliefs; possession of the latter is why Tories like Dr. Johnson and T.S. Eliot could do quite nicely without the constructs. Frye's largely imaginary eightfold roman  may have provided him a personal substitute— or alternative— for both ideology and myth."

From page 69 —
"For Frye the chief element of imaginative or expressive form is the myth, which functions structurally in literature like geometric shapes in painting."

From page 71 —
"The metaphysical skyhook lifting the artist free from unreflective social commitment is often a latent or manifest archetype that his work renews or reworks."

From page 77 —
"Frye's treatises— so little annotated themselves— are the notes writ large; the notes in the Notebooks are treatises writ small. They interpenetrate. Denham quotes 'the masters of the T'ien-tai school of Mahayana Buddhism' as saying '[t]he whole world is contained in a mustard seed' (RF  158, 160), and Frye quotes Keats: 'Every point of thought is the center of an intellectual world' (Study  159; cf. Great Code  167-68 and AC  61). …. [Frye’s] complex books were all generated out of the monadic obiter dicta . His kingdom 'is like a grain of mustard seed, which a man took, and cast into his garden, and it grew' (Luke 13:18-19)."

Friday, October 7, 2016

Paz

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:27 AM

The Paz quote below is from the last chapter
of his book, titled "The Dialectic of Solitude."

The phrase "dialectic of solitude" has been applied also to a 1967
book by the Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez:

The conclusion of One Hundred Years of Solitude ,
a 1967 novel by Gabriel García Márquez —

"He was so absorbed that he did not feel the second surge of wind either as its cyclonic strength tore the doors and windows off their hinges, pulled off the roof of the east wing, and uprooted the foundations. Only then did he discover that Amaranta Úrsula was not his sister but his aunt, and that Sir Francis Drake had attacked Riohacha only so that they could seek each other through the most intricate labyrinths of blood until they would engender the mythological animal that was to bring the line to an end. Macondo was already a fearful whirlwind of dust and rubble being spun about by the wrath of the biblical hurricane when Aureliano skipped eleven pages so as not to lose time with facts he knew only too well, and he began to decipher the instant that he was living, deciphering it as he lived it, prophesying himself in the act of deciphering the last page of the parchments, as if he were looking into a speaking mirror. Then he skipped again to anticipate the predictions and ascertain the date and circumstances of his death. Before reaching the final line, however, he had already understood that he would never leave that room, for it was foreseen that the city of mirrors (or mirages) would be wiped out by the wind and exiled from the memory of men at the precise moment when Aureliano Babilonia would finish deciphering the parchments, and that everything written on them was unrepeatable since time immemorial and forever more, because races condemned to one hundred years of solitude did not have a second opportunity on earth."

Update of Saturday, October 8:

I do not recommend taking very seriously the work of Latin American leftists
(or American academics) who like to use the word "dialectic."

A related phrase does, however, have a certain mystic or poetic charm,
as pointed out by Wikipedia —

"Unity of opposites is the central category of dialectics,
and it is viewed sometimes as a metaphysical concept,
a philosophical concept or a scientific concept."

See also Bullshit Studies.

Saturday, August 27, 2016

Folk Notation

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:01 PM

See the Chautauqua Season post of June 25
and a search for Notation  in this journal.

See as well the previous post and Bullshit Studies .

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

The Day of the Locus

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:48 AM

From A. Trehub's remarks on the "space-like retinoid system"
mentioned by Bernd Schmeikal in his masterpiece of bullshit,
"Four Forms Make a Universe" —

The Self Locus 

Trehub - 'Self as the neuronal origin of retinoid space'

For a different grounding of the self, see the previous post.

Monday, June 6, 2016

Intellect Limited

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:29 AM

Explorations in Media Ecology
Volume 12 Numbers 3 & 4
© 2013 Intellect Ltd Article.

For some background, see Bullshit Studies.

Friday, May 13, 2016

For the Late Mark Lane

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:01 AM

Sixties conspiracy theorist Mark Lane reportedly
died at 89 on Tuesday night.

From the previous post, But Seriously . . .  —

"Today, we are excited to share the fruits of our research
with the broader community . . . ."

Monday, May 9, 2016

Requiem for an Authority Figure

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:45 PM

Today's online New York Times  describes an authority
figure who reportedly died on Sunday (May 8, 2016) —

"With his preternaturally mature, intelligent but
(by Hollywood standards) unremarkable looks,
he was cast almost from the beginning as an
authority figure — a father or a teacher, a doctor
or a scientist, a mayor or a judge."

This  journal on Sunday

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Requiem for an Actress

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:15 PM

The New York Times  this evening on the late Rita Gam:

"After generally being typecast in supporting roles
in two dozen films for what Life described as
'her sultry face and insinuating voice,' she recalled
in 1992, 'I looked into the black pit at 40 and
wondered, what do I do for an encore?' "

See also Sidney Lumet in this journal as well as
"Some cartoon graveyards are better than others."

Monday, December 28, 2015

Mirrors, Mirrors, on the Wall

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 8:00 AM

The previous post quoted Holland Cotter's description of
the late Ellsworth Kelly as one who might have admired 
"the anonymous role of the Romanesque church artist." 

Work of a less anonymous sort was illustrated today by both
The New York Times  and The Washington Post

'Artist Who Shaped Geometries on a Bold Scale' - NY Times

'Ellsworth Kelly, the master of the deceptively simple' - Washington Post

The Post 's remarks are of particular interest:

Philip Kennicott in The Washington Post , Dec. 28, 2015,
on a work by the late Ellsworth Kelly —

“Sculpture for a Large Wall” consisted of 104 anodized aluminum panels, colored red, blue, yellow and black, and laid out on four long rows measuring 65 feet. Each panel seemed different from the next, subtle variations on the parallelogram, and yet together they also suggested a kind of language, or code, as if their shapes, colors and repeating patterns spelled out a basic computer language, or proto-digital message.

The space in between the panels, and the shadows they cast on the wall, were also part of the effect, creating a contrast between the material substance of the art, and the cascading visual and mental ideas it conveyed. The piece was playful, and serious; present and absent; material and imaginary; visually bold and intellectually diaphanous.

Often, with Kelly, you felt as if he offered up some ideal slice of the world, decontextualized almost to the point of absurdity. A single arc sliced out of a circle; a single perfect rectangle; one bold juxtaposition of color or shape. But when he allowed his work to encompass more complexity, to indulge a rhetoric of repetition, rhythmic contrasts, and multiple self-replicating ideas, it began to feel like language, or narrative. And this was always his best mode.

Compare and contrast a 2010 work by Josefine Lyche

IMAGE- The 2x2 case of the diamond theorem as illustrated by Josefine Lyche, Oct. 2010

Lyche's mirrors-on-the-wall installation is titled
"The 2×2 Case (Diamond Theorem)."

It is based on a smaller illustration of my own.

These  variations also, as Kennicott said of Kelly's,
"suggested a kind of language, or code."

This may well be the source of their appeal for Lyche.
For me, however, such suggestiveness is irrelevant to the
significance of the variations in a larger purely geometric
context.

This context is of course quite inaccessible to most art
critics. Steve Martin, however, has a phrase that applies
to both Kelly's and Lyche's installations: "wall power."
See a post of Dec. 15, 2010.

Sunday, October 25, 2015

Buyers and Sellers of Children

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:45 AM

(Continued.)

Featured on this morning's online front page of
The New York Times

Some further details —

An example of New York Times  culture is shown above —

"… Mondrian paintings at the Museum of Modern Art
blend symmetry with a tensile volatility."

(To be fair, this contemptible bullshit is from a picture caption,
not from the art review being summarized.)

Related cultural observations —

Math for Child Buyers  and  Fiction for Child Sellers.

Sunday, September 20, 2015

Misgiving

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 PM

"Charles Kenneth Williams was born on Nov. 4, 1936,
in Newark. His father, Paul, sold office machines,
and, as he prospered, moved with his wife, the former
Dossie Kasdin, and his two sons to suburban South Orange.
Mr. Williams’s conflicted relationship with his parents
takes up much of his 2000 memoir, Misgivings: My Mother,
My Father, Myself 
. " — NY Times  obituary this evening

Near the Haunted Castle
A poem by C. K. Williams

"This is a story. You don't have to think about it,
it's make-believe. / It's like a lie, maybe not quite a lie
but I don't want you to worry about it. . . . ."

For a more interesting cinematic haunting, see the new film "Pay the Ghost."

Sunday, August 30, 2015

Lines

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:01 AM

"We tell ourselves stories in order to live." — Joan Didion

A post from St. Augustine's day, 2015, may serve to
illustrate this.

The post started with a look at a painting by Swiss artist
Wolf Barth, "Spielfeld." The painting portrays two
rectangular arrays, of four and of twelve subsquares, 
that sit atop a square array of sixteen subsquares.

To one familiar with Euclid's "bride's chair" proof of the
Pythagorean theorem, "Spielfeld" suggests a right triangle
with squares on its sides of areas 4, 12, and 16.

That image in turn suggests a diagram illustrating the fact
that a triangle suitably inscribed in a half-circle is a right 
triangle… in this case, a right triangle with angles of 30, 60,
and 90 degrees… Thus —

In memory of screenwriter John Gregory Dunne (husband
of Joan Didion and author of, among other things, The Studio
here is a cinematric approach to the above figure.

The half-circle at top suggests the dome of an observatory.
This in turn suggests a scene from the 2014 film "Magic in
the Moonlight."  

As she gazes at the silent universe above
through an opening in the dome, the silent
Emma Stone is perhaps thinking, 
prompted by her work with Spider-Man

"Drop me a line."

As he  gazes at the crack in the dome,
Stone's costar Colin Firth contrasts the vastness 
of the Universe with the smallness of Man, citing 

"the tiny field F2 with two elements."

In conclusion, recall the words of author Norman Mailer
that summarized his Harvard education —

"At times, bullshit can only be countered
with superior bullshit."

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Mother’s Day for Bill Murray

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:59 PM

The late Elizabeth Wilson as
the mother of Billl Murray's FDR 
in "Hyde Park on Hudson."

Wilson reportedly died at 94 on Saturday, May 9, 2015.

Related material: This journal on that date, and 
the following —

Sunday, May 3, 2015

Das Scheinen

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

The title of Saturday night's post, "Die Scheinung ," is taken from
a 1920 book on a German poet, where "Scheinung " is associated
with "Maja ," a German spelling of a word with the connotation of
"the veil of illusion."

The phrase "Das Scheinen " is closer to "The Shining" in the
novel of that title by Stephen King. Some related remarks —

From a review of Capobianco's Engaging Heidegger —

"refreshing for its clarity and scholarly precision"

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Plan 9…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Or:  Bullshit for Brit   continues.

From the new film "I Origins," starring Brit Marling —

Plan 9:

The protagonist of "I Origins" is led to the above billboard
by apparently chance encounters with 11 's — such as the
1111 on the following page —

Update of Dec. 10, 2014: The "bullshit" in the subtitle above refers
to the remarks of Joan Stambaugh, not those of Nicholas of Cusa.
The passage from Nicholas was added because it indicates a more
reliable source than Stambaugh, because it is relevant to lines
about the metaphorical significance of light in "I Origins," and 
because it contains the number 1111. 

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Contest

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

Once again, Harvard defeats Holy Cross.

IMAGE- Joseph Campbell, 'The Inner Reaches of Outer Space,' meditation on the number nine, the Goddess, and the Angelus

See also a related remark by Norman Mailer, and Plan 9 in this journal.

Presumably the Holy Cross defeat will please art theorist Rosalind Krauss (below).

(Click to enlarge.)

Monday, August 4, 2014

Bunch vs. Bunch

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 PM

“This is a divorce case that was before us on an earlier occasion.”

Wild:

From the director of The Wild Bunch

Brady:

From The New York Times —

Sunday, August 3, 2014

Unplatonic Dialogue

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:12 PM

Dialogue from “The Osterman Weekend”—

01:57:22  “Why did he make us try to believe Omega existed?”
01:57:25    ….
01:57:26  “The existence of Omega has not been disproved.
01:57:28  Don’t you understand that?
01:57:31  Omega is as real  as we need it to be.”

See also Omega elsewhere in this journal.

Update of 9:15 PM ET —

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Study This Example, Part II

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:06 AM

(Continued from 10:09 AM today)

The quotation below is from a webpage on media magnate
Walter Annenberg.

Annenberg Hall at Harvard, originally constructed to honor
the Civil War dead, was renamed in 1996 for his son Roger,
Harvard Class of ’62.

www.broadcastpioneers.com/
walterannenberg.html

“It was said that Roger was ‘moody and sullen’
spending large parts of his time reading poetry
and playing classical music piano. It had been
reported that Roger attempted suicide at the
age of eleven by slitting his wrists. He recovered
and was graduated Magna Cum Laude from
Episcopal Academy in our area. For awhile,
Roger attended Harvard, but he was removed
from the school’s rolls after Roger stopped doing
his school work and spent almost all his time
reading poetry in his room. He then was sent to
an exclusive and expensive treatment center
in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. At that facility,
Roger became more remote. It was said that he
often didn’t recognize or acknowledge his father.
On August 7, 1962, Roger Annenberg died from
an overdose of sleeping pills.”

A more appropriate Annenberg memorial, an article
in The Atlantic  magazine on June 25, notes that…

“Among those who ended up losing their battles
with mental illness through suicide are
Virginia Woolf, Ernest Hemingway, Vincent van Gogh,
John Berryman, Hart Crane, Mark Rothko, Diane Arbus,
Anne Sexton, and Arshile Gorky.”

Friday, March 14, 2014

Whitewashing Picasso

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 4:30 PM

A search today for Edward Frenkel's phrase
"portals into the magic world of modern math"
leads to a reprint of his March 2 LA Times  opinion piece
in The Salem News —

IMAGE- Edward Frenkel in The Salem News

To hell with Picasso, I'll take Tom Sawyer.

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

See More Glass

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 PM

The first story of "The Snow Queen, in Seven Stories"
by Hans Christian Andersen (1845) (see yesterday morning)—

Story the First,
Which Describes a Looking-Glass
and the Broken Fragments

You must attend to the commencement of this story, for when we get to the end we shall know more than we do now about a very wicked hobgoblin; he was one of the very worst, for he was a real demon.  One day, when he was in a merry mood, he made a looking-glass which had the power of making everything good or beautiful that was reflected in it almost shrink to nothing, while everything that was worthless and bad looked increased in size and worse than ever. The most lovely landscapes appeared like boiled spinach, and the people became hideous, and looked as if they stood on their heads and had no bodies. Their countenances were so distorted that no one could recognize them, and even one freckle on the face appeared to spread over the whole of the nose and mouth. The demon said this was very amusing. When a good or pious thought passed through the mind of any one it was misrepresented in the glass; and then how the demon laughed at his cunning invention. All who went to the demon’s school—for he kept a school—talked everywhere of the wonders they had seen, and declared that people could now, for the first time, see what the world and mankind were really like. They carried the glass about everywhere, till at last there was not a land nor a people who had not been looked at through this distorted mirror. They wanted even to fly with it up to heaven to see the angels, but the higher they flew the more slippery the glass became, and they could scarcely hold it, till at last it slipped from their hands, fell to the earth, and was broken into millions of pieces. But now the looking-glass caused more unhappiness than ever, for some of the fragments were not so large as a grain of sand, and they flew about the world into every country. When one of these tiny atoms flew into a person’s eye, it stuck there unknown to him, and from that moment he saw everything through a distorted medium, or could see only the worst side of what he looked at, for even the smallest fragment retained the same power which had belonged to the whole mirror. Some few persons even got a fragment of the looking-glass in their hearts, and this was very terrible, for their hearts became cold like a lump of ice. A few of the pieces were so large that they could be used as window-panes; it would have been a sad thing to look at our friends through them. Other pieces were made into spectacles; this was dreadful for those who wore them, for they could see nothing either rightly or justly. At all this the wicked demon laughed till his sides shook—it tickled him so to see the mischief he had done. There were still a number of these little fragments of glass floating about in the air, and now you shall hear what happened with one of them.

 "Was there more to come? Was I done?
I wondered if I had dreamed
the connectedness of Being
the night before, or if now, awake,
I dreamed distinctions.
I didn’t know where I was for an instant."

"Alethia," by Charles Johnson, as
     quoted by Eve Tushnet on Aug. 22, 2013

Tushnet on Johnson —

"Somebody–I hope a commenter will remind me who it was–
has suggested that the Left typically thinks in terms of an
opposition between oppression and liberation, whereas
the right typically thinks in terms of an opposition between
civilization and barbarism. I would reframe the latter opposition
as order vs. chaos; if we do that, it’s obvious that both
oppositions are unrelentingly relevant, yet few thinkers or artists
are able to hold both conflicts before our eyes at once.

I just finished Charles Johnson’s 1986 short-story collection 
The Sorcerer’s Apprentice: Tales and Conjurations ,
a bag of broken glass which is equal parts liberationist and
reactionary, yearning for freedom and knuckling under to fatalism." 

Related material —

Saturday Night Live, Dec. 11, 1976

Consumer Reporter: Alright. Fine. Fine. Well, we'd like to show you another  one of Mr. Mainway's products. It retails for $1.98, and it's called Bag O' Glass. [ holds up bag of glass ] Mr. Mainway, this is simply a bag of jagged, dangerous, glass bits.

Irwin Mainway: Yeah, right, it's you know, it's glass, it's broken glass, you know? It sells very well, as a matter of fact, you know? It's just broken glass, you know?

Consumer Reporter: [ laughs ] I don't understand. I mean, children could seriously cut themselves on any one of these pieces!

Irwin Mainway: Yeah, well, look – you know, the average kid, he picks up, you know, broken glass anywhere, you know? The beach, the street, garbage cans, parking lots, all over the place in any big city. We're just packaging what the kids want! I mean, it's a creative toy, you know? If you hold this up, you know, you see colors, every color of the rainbow! I mean, it teaches him about light refraction, you know? Prisms, and that stuff! You know what I mean?

Tommy Lee Jones perhaps knows what Mainway means.
Kristen Wiig (see Aug. 22, 2013, in this  journal) perhaps does not.

See also Tushnet on The Man in the High Castle  as well as
Tommy Lee Jones and Hexagram 61.

Saturday, September 28, 2013

Wiener News

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:19 PM

Legendary Magician John Calvert Dies at 102

The Hollywood Reporter , 8:36 PM PDT 9/27/2013
 by Mike Barnes 

" 'Out in Hollywood many years ago, Danny Kaye was
in my show and came out and impersonated Hitler,'
Calvert said in a 1998 interview. 'Then the Marines
would come out and grab him and put him in the buzz saw
and we’d cut his head off, put his head in a sausage grinder,
and out came German wieners!' "

See MAX in the posts of September 9th.

"Calvert died Friday [Sept. 27] in Lancaster, Calif., according to
The International Brotherhood of Magicians."

See also The Carlin Code (May 12, 2006).

Sunday, September 15, 2013

Sermon

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Suggested by a poem in the current  New Yorker.

Today's text —

"We have no more beginnings. 
Incipit : that proud Latin word
which signals the start
survives in our dusty 'inception'."

— George Steiner, beginning of
      Grammars of Creation

Reply in the Latin tradition—

.

Cast

(From the Log24 posts
of August 23-24, 2013)

Thursday, August 8, 2013

Heaven’s Gate

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:01 PM

Yesterday's post Devil's Gate provided a dark view of life and culture.

A more cheerful view is provided by the late Gail Levin,
a maker of PBS "American Masters" documentaries
that included, notably, Jeff Bridges and Marilyn Monroe.

Levin reportedly died at 67 on July 31, 2013.*

An image from an interview with Levin —

The date in the image, July 19th, 2006, is the broadcast
date of the PBS "American Masters" program on Monroe.
A check for synchronicity shows there was no Log24 post
on that date.

See, however, posts for the day before— "Sacred Order"—
and the day after— "Bead Game."

A related quote from an article linked to in the latter—

"First world culture, which is 'pagan and in the majority
everywhere,' has as its defining characteristic
a 'primacy of possibility,' or pop— a broadly inclusive
concept that covers everything from the Aboriginal
dreamtime to Plato’s Forms."

Review by Jess Castle of Philip Rieff’s 
Sacred Order/Social Order, Vol. 1: My Life among the
Deathworks: Illustrations of the Aesthetics of Authority
,
University of Virginia Press, 2006. 256 pages, $34.95.

This quote may serve as the missing July 19, 2006, post.

Related material:  Dreamtime,  Possibility,  and Plato's Forms.

* See that date in this journal for two less famous American
  masters, artist Edward Valigursky and writer Robert Silverberg.

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Title

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:06 PM

Google search result at 1 PM ET April 24, 2013:

New York Stage and Film 2013 Musicals – EPA – Playbill
www.playbill.com/jobs/find/job_detail/51922.html
14 hours ago – BRIGHT STAR
Casting: Howie Cherpakov
Music by Edie Brickell and Steve Martin
Lyrics by Edie Brickell Book by Steve Martin…

The musical is set in North Carolina.

From Howie Cherpakov:

IMAGE- Tabletop obelisk, Casting Society of America symbol

From North Carolina:

Archibald Henderson monument, Chestnut Hill Cemetery, Salisbury, NC

Henderson died in 1963 on the Feast of St. Nicholas.
Related material: Santa vs. the Obelisk.

Tuesday, January 8, 2013

Necessary Angel

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:29 AM

Old Stone-Cutter

His gravestones are his everlasting children.
He loves to get his cramped left hand around
the solid faithful feeling of his chisel
and dig the names of those below the ground

or the family names of provident ones above
who cross their fingers and defy the fates
and acknowledge death their enemy and master
by ordering headstones with their birthing dates.

He carves his holy head, a solemn cherub
with granite wings and childish eyes cast down.
Those who prefer a willowed urn, disliking
angels, can go and die in another town.

FRANCES FROST

(From The North American Review , Vol. 248, No. 2,
1939, page 301)

Solemn cherub by Albrecht Dürer in 1514

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

For Leonard Cohen Fans

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Leading this morning's online New York Times  
obituaries list is one for a leftist Episcopal priest.

That obituary contains a link to a 1996 Times  story — 

Old Friends, New Foes:
President and a Preacher;
One 60's Activist Runs Columbia;
One Fights It

A check for background on the Columbia president
in that story yields the following from a leftist journalist's
website in a 2012 post dated October 26 (date of the
1917 October Revolution in Russia)—

Click for further details of this leftist allegation, which is
clearly false (because based on a ludicrously bad
misreading of a Rice University puff piece), and would
be libelous if its target were alive.

See a Rice University obituary for the "Nazi spy"
in question, who died on May 25, 2010. (See also
 this journal on that date.)

The same leftist webpage contains a link to another leftist's
attack on a respected charitable organization that may
or may not have, or have had, CIA connections—

The International Rescue Committee (IRC).

In the spirit of Leonard Cohen's "then we take Berlin" lyric,
here is a note on how the IRC logo

might be rendered in a way that is, though less visually appealing,
more logical— i.e., more purely an example of Bauhaus style—

         

See also the recent  Black October post
on a Columbia enthusiast of the October Revolution—

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Another Green Door, and…

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 3:48 AM

Another Bullshit Night in Suck City:

IMAGE- 'Another Bullshit Night in Suck City,' by Nick Flynn

For the 2012 film version, see

(Click image below for a review.)

Personally, I prefer the green door of last night's 10 PM post
(
written partly in honor of the body mentioned here on October 23).

The cover of the Nick Flynn book shows a green door beneath a tree.
For a different tree, but similar metaphor, see Confirmation (July 16, 2007).

Sunday, October 21, 2012

For a Dead Editor*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:21 PM

"I came by chance upon his tombstone,
a massive block of stone lightly covered
with fresh snow."

— Freeman Dyson on Wittgenstein,
     linked to here at 1 PM ET Saturday.

Cast a cold eye.

* Leon Jaroff, who reportedly died Saturday.

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Incommensurables

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:48 AM

(Continued from Midsummer Eve)

"At times, bullshit can only be countered with superior bullshit."

— Norman Mailer, March 3, 1992, PBS transcript

"Just because it is a transition between incommensurables, the transition between competing paradigms cannot be made a step at a time, forced by logic and neutral experience. Like the gestalt switch, it must occur all at once (though not necessarily in an instant) or not at all."

Thomas Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions , 1962, as quoted in The Enneagram of Paradigm Shifting

"In the spiritual traditions from which Jung borrowed the term, it is not the SYMMETRY of mandalas that is all-important, as Jung later led us to believe. It is their capacity to reveal the asymmetry that resides at the very heart of symmetry." 

The Enneagram as Mandala

I have little respect for Enneagram enthusiasts, but they do at times illustrate Mailer's maxim.

My own interests are in the purely mathematical properties of the number nine, as well as those of the next square, sixteen.

Those who prefer bullshit may investigate non-mathematical properties of sixteen by doing a Google image search on MBTI.

For bullshit involving nine, see (for instance) Einsatz  in this journal.

For non-bullshit involving nine, sixteen, and "asymmetry that resides at the very heart of symmetry," see Monday's Mapping Problem continued. (The nine occurs there as the symmetric  figures in the lower right nine-sixteenths of the triangular analogs  diagram.)

For non-bullshit involving psychological and philosophical terminology, see James Hillman's Re-Visioning Psychology .

In particular, see Hillman's "An Excursion on Differences Between Soul and Spirit."

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Architectural Memorial

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 AM

In memory of two figures from tonight's NY Times  obituaries index
(not  Nora Ephron and Anthony J. Wiener)—

IMAGE- Obits for art historian Paula Hays Harper and architect Gerhard Kallmann

Tower Envy

Erin Burnett and Jenga blocks yesterday

Related material—

The Bible Puzzle Book

IMAGE- Tower of alphabet blocks

and the monumental treatise
by Leonard Shlain

The Alphabet Versus
the Goddess: The Conflict
Between Word and Image
.

Thursday, December 1, 2011

Paranoia Strikes Deep

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 PM

Tens of Millions of Smartphones Come With Spyware
Preinstalled, Security Analyst Says

Published December 01, 2011 – FoxNews.com

For details, see comments at YouTube.

Related entertainment—

1. Tara Fitzgerald in “New World Disorder” (1999)—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111201-NewWorldDisorder-TaraFitzgerald.jpg

We skipped the light fandango
turned cartwheels ‘cross the floor
I was feeling kinda seasick
but the crowd called out for more

2. Tara Fitzgerald in “Broken Glass” (2011)—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111201-TaraFitgerald-BrokenGlass.jpg

And so it was that later
as the miller told his tale
that her face, at first just ghostly,
turned a whiter shade of pale

Procul Harum song at beginning and end of “The Net” (1995)

“Lord Arglay had a suspicion that the Stone
would be purely logical.  Yes, he thought,
but what, in that sense, were the rules of its pure logic?”

Many Dimensions  (1931), by Charles Williams,
quoted here on Kristallnacht 2011

See also, from “The Net“—

Decompiling Wolfenstein

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111201-DecompilingWolfenstein.jpg

“In Wolfenstein 3D , the player assumes the role of an American soldier
of Polish descent… attempting to escape from the Nazi stronghold of
Castle Wolfenstein.” — Wikipedia

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Occupy Space

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:35 AM

A chess set previously mentioned in this journal—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111120-ChessSet-419x1180.jpg

These chessmen appeared in the weblog Minimalissimo 
on Sept. 20, 2010. In Log24 on that date, the issue was
not so much the chessmen as the underlying board.
See "The Unfolding." See also the following from
the Occupy Space  gallery in Limerick today—

C A V E S – Anthony Murphy Solo Exhibition
 
Opening 7 pm Thursday 1st Dec
Exhibition 2nd – 22nd Dec 2011

Plato's allegory of the cave describes prisoners, inhabiting the cave since childhood, immobile, facing an interior wall. A large fire burns behind the prisoners, and as people pass this fire their shadows are cast upon the cave's wall, and these shadows of the activity being played out behind the prisoner become the only version of reality that the prisoner knows.

C A V E S  is an exhibition of three large scale works, each designed to immerse the viewer, and then to confront the audience with a question regarding how far they, as privileged viewers of the shadows and reflections being played out upon the walls, are willing to allow themselves to believe what they know to be a false reality.

The works are based on explorations of simple 2D shapes; regular polygons are exploded to create fractured pattern, or layered upon one another until intricate forms emerge, upon which the projections can begin to draw out a third dimension.

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Relativistic Truth

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:25 PM

Today's online New York Times on the conclusion of the Roman Catholic Church's "World Youth" week—

"At the end of Sunday’s Mass, the pope announced that the next such event would be in Rio de Janeiro in 2013. Until then, he told those at the service, in Portuguese, that they 'will be swimming against the tide in a society with a relativistic culture, which wishes neither to seek nor hold on to the truth.'*"

* Fact check— This agrees with the Vatican Radio version.

Related material: Relativity Blues and Portal to 1937

IMAGE- Hotel Bella Vista as 'Portal del Aguila de Oro'

The "Portal" link above is in honor of the May 2 dies natalis of Salomon Bochner (pdf).
For some background, see yesterday's Castles in the Air and Bochner in this journal.

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Truth, Beauty, Bullshit

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:16 PM

This post is for the Stonehenge solstice crowd, who might,
like the London artist Steve Richards, confuse bullshit
with scholarship and inspire the same confusion
in others.

IMAGE- Motto of Forgotten Books, with pirated quotation from Shakespeare that might be appropriate for London's 'Piracy Project'

The image, apparently an epigraph put there
by the author, is from the Forgotten Books edition
of Cassirer's Substance and Function:
And Einstein's Theory of Relativity
.

This is a scanned copy of the 1923 original.
The egg-figure above, however, is from the publisher's
prefatory notes and not  from the original.

A check of other Forgotten Books publications
shows that the motto and the Bacon
attribution are those of Forgotten Books and
not  of the authors they reprint — in particular,
not  of Ernst Cassirer, who would probably
be dismayed to have this nonsense associated
with his work.

Why nonsense? The attribution to Francis Bacon is
false. The lines are from "The Phoenix and the Turtle"
by William Shakespeare.

Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Peace and War

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:02 PM

This post was suggested by—

  1. A quotation from Under the Volcano :
    "A corpse will be transported by express!"
  2. The wish in a novel by Ernesto Sábato, who died Saturday, April 30,
    for a tombstone that says "PEACE"
  3. A statement by another author in this morning's post:
    "I think of myself as writing about war," said Robson….
    "I try to get away from war, but I can't.
    War forces ordinary people to behave extraordinarily."

The above Sábato novel was translated as The Angel of Darkness .
Its Spanish title was "Abaddón el Exterminador " (Abaddon the Exterminator ).

From a customer review of the novel at Amazon.com—

"Early in the book a drunken outcast will see the vision of the Great Beast of Revelation. Near the end he will tell others of what he has seen. Meanwhile Sábato, who was originally trained as a scientist, seeks out the supernatural and the mystical in order to find an antidote to Stalinism, simple-minded 'Progress' and a superficial positivism."

For a more sophisticated vision of the Beast, see The Ninth Gate.

For Abaddon in a less sophisticated antidote to positivism, see The Chronicle of Abaddon the Destroyer: The War in Heaven .

I prefer Charles Williams's approach to War in Heaven .

If there is an afterlife, perhaps Sábato's experience there will be more lively than his novel's tombstone would imply.

He may, despite his wish for heavenly peace, turn out to be (in a phrase from this morning's post) a badly needed "ghost warrior."

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Birthdays

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:29 PM

For Pope Benedict XVI and the late Al Sears

Today is the Pope's birthday. Another date of interest—

Al Sears, composer of "Castle Rock," is said to have died at 80 on March 23, 1990. If Sears were a saint, March 23 would be his saint's day— his dies natalis  (day of birth into heaven).

For Al—

This morning's post linked to a picture of Alicia Keys's hands at a piano keyboard. Some background from March 23 this  year— "Well, she was just 17" and The Heroic Finger.

For the Pope—

IMAGE- book cover- 'Secret of the Golden FLower'

Click, as the instructions say,
to look inside.

Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Dry Bones

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:59 PM

The webpage of Cullinane College — "For Love of God…."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101228-CullinaneCollege.jpg

Related material —

From a post for the opening of Cullinane College on January 29, 2003:

"Young man sings 'Dry Bones'"

Illustrations:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101228-ThePrisonerTrial.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101228-ThePrisonerEandE.jpg

What prompted the above meditation —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101228-Memento-BillWhite.jpg

From an obituary of Bill White (who reportedly died at 66 on November 14)—

"During his career, he was consulted by, among others,
the crime writer Patricia Cornwell, and the artist Damien Hirst
(who used his expertise when working on his 2007 piece
For the Love of God, a platinum cast of a skull, encrusted with diamonds)."

Monday, December 13, 2010

Plan 9 Revisited

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Leading today's New York Times  obituaries —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101213-NYTobits.jpg

— is that of Nassos Daphnis, a painter of geometric abstractions
who in 1995 had an exhibition at a Leo Castelli gallery
titled "Energies in Outer Space." (See pictures here.)

Daphnis died, according to the Times, on November 23.
See Art Object, a post in this journal on that date—

There is more than one way
to look at a cube.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101123-plain_cube_200x227.gif

Some context— this morning's previous post (Apollo's 13,
on the geometry of the 3×3×3 cube), yesterday's noon post
featuring the 3×3 square grid (said to be a symbol of Apollo),

The 3x3 square

and, for connoisseurs of the Ed Wood school of cinematic art,
a search in this journal for the phrase "Plan 9."

You can't make this stuff up.

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Caesarian

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 8:00 AM

The Dreidel Is Cast

The Nietzschean phrase "ruling and Caesarian spirits" occurred in yesterday morning's post "Novel Ending."

That post was followed yesterday morning by a post marking, instead, a beginning— that of Hanukkah 2010. That Jewish holiday, whose name means "dedication," commemorates the (re)dedication of the Temple in Jerusalem in 165 BC.

The holiday is celebrated with, among other things, the Jewish version of a die—  the dreidel . Note the similarity of the dreidel  to an illustration of The Stone*  on the cover of the 2001 Eerdmans edition of  Charles Williams's 1931 novel Many Dimensions

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101202-DreidelAndStone.jpg

For mathematics related to the dreidel , see Ivars Peterson's column on this date fourteen years ago.
For mathematics related (if only poetically) to The Stone , see "Solomon's Cube" in this journal.

Here is the opening of Many Dimensions

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101202-WilliamsChOne.jpg

For a fanciful linkage of the dreidel 's concept of chance to The Stone 's concept of invariant law, note that the New York Lottery yesterday evening (the beginning of Hanukkah) was 840. See also the number 840 in the final post (July 20, 2002) of the "Solomon's Cube" search.

Some further holiday meditations on a beginning—

Today, on the first full day of Hanukkah, we may or may not choose to mark another beginning— that of George Frederick James Temple, who was born in London on this date in 1901. Temple, a mathematician, was President of the London Mathematical Society in 1951-1953. From his MacTutor biography

"In 1981 (at the age of 80) he published a book on the history of mathematics. This book 100 years of mathematics (1981) took him ten years to write and deals with, in his own words:-

those branches of mathematics in which I had been personally involved.

He declared that it was his last mathematics book, and entered the Benedictine Order as a monk. He was ordained in 1983 and entered Quarr Abbey on the Isle of Wight. However he could not stop doing mathematics and when he died he left a manuscript on the foundations of mathematics. He claims:-

The purpose of this investigation is to carry out the primary part of Hilbert's programme, i.e. to establish the consistency of set theory, abstract arithmetic and propositional logic and the method used is to construct a new and fundamental theory from which these theories can be deduced."

For a brief review of Temple's last work, see the note by Martin Hyland in "Fundamental Mathematical Theories," by George Temple, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, A, Vol. 354, No. 1714 (Aug. 15, 1996), pp. 1941-1967.

The following remarks by Hyland are of more general interest—

"… one might crudely distinguish between philosophical and mathematical motivation. In the first case one tries to convince with a telling conceptual story; in the second one relies more on the elegance of some emergent mathematical structure. If there is a tradition in logic it favours the former, but I have a sneaking affection for the latter. Of course the distinction is not so clear cut. Elegant mathematics will of itself tell a tale, and one with the merit of simplicity. This may carry philosophical weight. But that cannot be guaranteed: in the end one cannot escape the need to form a judgement of significance."

— J. M. E. Hyland. "Proof Theory in the Abstract." (pdf)
Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 114, 2002, 43-78.

Here Hyland appears to be discussing semantic ("philosophical," or conceptual) and syntactic ("mathematical," or structural) approaches to proof theory. Some other remarks along these lines, from the late Gian-Carlo Rota

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101202-RotaChXII-sm.jpg

    (Click to enlarge.)

See also "Galois Connections" at alpheccar.org and "The Galois Connection Between Syntax and Semantics" at logicmatters.net.

* Williams's novel says the letters of The Stone  are those of the Tetragrammaton— i.e., Yod, He, Vau, He  (cf. p. 26 of the 2001 Eerdmans edition). But the letters on the 2001 edition's cover Stone  include the three-pronged letter Shin , also found on the dreidel .  What esoteric religious meaning is implied by this, I do not know.

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Prime Directive

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 4:01 PM

Rigor

“317 is a prime, not because we think so,
or because our minds are shaped in one way
rather than another, but because it is so,
because mathematical reality is built that way.”

 – G. H. Hardy,
A Mathematician’s Apology

The Ratzinger brothers in Germany, Sept. 11, 2006

The above photo is taken from
a post in this journal dated
March 10, 2010.

This was, as the Pope might say,
the dies natalis  of a master gameplayer–

New York Times, March 16, 2010–

Tim Holland, Backgammon Master,
Dies at 79

By DENNIS HEVESI

Tim Holland, who was widely considered the world’s greatest backgammon player during that ancient board game’s modern heyday, in the 1960s and ’70s, died on March 10 at his home in West Palm Beach, Fla. He was 79. <<more>>

In Holland's honor, a post
from Columbus Day, 2004

Tuesday October 12, 2004

11:11 PM

 Time and Chance

Today’s winning lottery numbers
in Pennsylvania (State of Grace):

Midday: 373
Evening: 816.

New Yorker cartoon-- Heavenly chessboard-- Man peering over the edge sees backgammon board

A quote from Holland on backgammon–

"It’s the luck factor that seduces everyone
into believing that they are good,
that they can actually win,
but that’s just wishful thinking."

For those who are, like G.H. Hardy,
suspicious of wishful thinking,
here is a quote and a picture from
Holland's ordinary  birthday, March 3

"The die is cast." — Caesar

Group of 8 cube-face permutations generated by reflections in midplanes parallel to faces

Saturday, March 13, 2010

ART WARS continued…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:01 PM

Remember the Sabbath Day

Wikipedia states that painter R.B. Kitaj (see previous references) was the model for the protagonist of the Philip Roth novel Sabbath's Theater.

A Google search shows that the article (no longer online) on Kitaj cited as a source by Wikipedia does indeed make this claim– 

In-Your-Face Outsider | Jerusalem Report | Jerusalem Post
By MATT NESVISKY not least, Philip Roth, who modeled
the protagonist of the 1995 novel "Sabbath's Theater" largely after Kitaj.
www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?apage=2&cid=1192380767901…

The rest of Nesvisky's article may or may not support his claim. It is available by subscribing to HighBeam.

Related material–

The New York Times on Oct. 24, 2007–

R. B. Kitaj, Painter of Moody Human Dramas, Dies at 74

Ileana Sonnabend, Art World Figure, Dies at 92

Ileana Sonnabend’s eye, shrewdness and lasting alliance with her first husband, Leo Castelli, made her one of the most formidable contemporary art dealers of her time.

"Sonnabend" means "Saturday" in German.

Some say the Sabbath is Saturday, others say Sunday.

Here is the Log24 entry for the day that
Kitaj and Sonnabend dieda Sunday

Sunday October 21, 2007

10:31 AM

Halloween
Meditations

continued from
October 31, 2005


The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/Gameplayers12.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.


From The Gameplayers of Zan

“The Game in the Ship cannot be approached as a job, a vocation, a career, or a recreation. To the contrary, it is Life and Death itself at work there. In the Inner Game, we call the Game Dhum Welur, the Mind of God. And that Mind is a terrible mind, that one may not face directly and remain whole. Some of the forerunners guessed it long ago– first the Hebrews far back in time, others along the way, and they wisely left it alone, left the Arcana alone.”

The New York Times on Sonnabend:

… Also talked about was the Sonnabend 1991 show of Jeff Koons’s “Made in Heaven” series of paintings and sculptures that showed the artist engaged in sexual acts with his wife, Ilona Staller.

Mrs. Sonnabend was variously described as “an iron marshmallow” and “a cross between Buddha and Machiavelli.” Short and plump, she was grandmotherly in appearance from a relatively early age due in part to an illness that necessitated a wig.

Her genteel, old Europe manner belied an often imperious yet bohemian and self-deprecating personality. Her soft, fluty voice often left a listener unprepared for the force of her comments, which she could deliver in at least five languages.

Happy Women's History Month.

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Plato’s Ghost

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:07 AM

Jeremy Gray, Plato's Ghost: The Modernist Transformation of Mathematics, Princeton, 2008–

"Here, modernism is defined as an autonomous body of ideas, having little or no outward reference, placing considerable emphasis on formal aspects of the work and maintaining a complicated— indeed, anxious— rather than a naïve relationship with the day-to-day world, which is the de facto view of a coherent group of people, such as a professional or discipline-based group that has a high sense of the seriousness and value of what it is trying to achieve. This brisk definition…."

Brisk? Consider Caesar's "The die is cast," Gray in "Solomon's Cube," and yesterday's post

Group of 8 cube-face permutations generated by reflections in midplanes parallel to faces

This is the group of "8 rigid motions
generated by reflections in midplanes"
of Solomon's Cube.

Related material:

"… the action of G168 in its alternative guise as SL(3; Z/2Z) is also now apparent. This version of G168 was presented by Weber in [1896, p. 539],* where he attributed it to Kronecker."

— Jeremy Gray, "From the History of a Simple Group," in The Eightfold Way, MSRI Publications, 1998

Here MSRI, an acronym for Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, is pronounced "Misery." See Stephen King, K.C. Cole, and Heinrich Weber.

*H. Weber, Lehrbuch der Algebra, Vieweg, Braunschweig, 1896. Reprinted by Chelsea, New York, 1961.

Friday, February 12, 2010

Capital E

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 10:30 AM

Where Entertainment is God, continued

The following paragraphs are from a review by Piotr Siemion of Infinite Jest, a novel by David Foster Wallace. Illustrations have been added.

"Wallace was somehow able to twist together three yarns…. …there's a J.D Salinger for those who like J.D. Salinger. There's William Burroughs for those hardy souls who like some kick in their prose. And there's a dash of Kurt Vonnegut too. All three voices, though, are amplified in Infinite Jest beyond mere distortion and then projected onto Wallace's peculiar own three-ring circus….

Venn diagram of three sets

… there's entertainment. Make it a capital E.

Hilary Swank in 'Million Dollar Baby'

Illustration by Clint Eastwood
from Log24 post "E is for Everlast"

Infinite Jest revolves, among its many gyrations, around the story of the Entertainment, a film-like creation going by the title of 'Infinite Jest' and created shortly before his suicidal death by the young tennis star's father. The Entertainment's copies are now being disseminated clandestinely all over Wallace's funny America. Problem is, of course, that the film is too good. Anybody who gets to watch it becomes hooked instantly and craves only to watch it again, and again, and again, until the audience drops dead of exhaustion and hunger. Why eat when you're entertained by such a good movie? Wallace's premise brings you back to that apocryphal lab experiment in which rats were treated to a similar choice. When the rat pushed one button, marked FOOD, it would get a food pellet. The other button, marked FUN, would fire up an electrode rigged right into the orgasm center somewhere in the rat's cortex. Needless to add, one rat after another would drop dead from hunger, still twitching luridly and trying to finesse one last push of the button. Same thing in Wallace's story, especially that even those characters who have not seen the Entertainment yet, keep on entertaining themselves by different means."

The title of the Entertainment, "Infinite Jest," might also be applied to a BBC program featuring mathematician Peter J. Cameron. The program's actual title was "To Infinity and Beyond." It was broadcast the night of Feb. 10 (the date of this journal's previous post).

Few, however, are likely to find the Infinity program addictive. For closer approaches to Wallace's ideal Entertainment, see instead Dante (in the context of this journal's Feb. 4 posts on Cameron and the afterlife) and the BBC News.

Monday, September 21, 2009

Monday September 21, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:56 AM
Keys

A Google search for "Das Scheinen," a very rough translation into Heidegger's German of "The Shining," leads to a song. A search for the English version of the song leads to a site with a sidebar advertising Pearl Jam's new (Sept. 20) album "Backspacer."
 

Packaging:

Pearl Jam 'Backspacer' album released Sept. 20, 2009

Happy birthday,
 Stephen King.

Background:

Yesterday's entries
and the plot of
L'Engle's classic
A Wrinkle in Time.
(See this journal's entries
for March 2008.)

The Pearl Jam album cover art
is of particular interest in light
of King's story "Apt Pupil" and
of Katherine Neville's remark
"Nine is a very powerful
Nordic number.
"

Those who prefer more sophisticated
aesthetic theory may click on the
following keys:

Back Space key from manual typewriter, linking to Babich on Music, Nietzsche, and Heidegger
Shift Lock key from manual typewriter, linking to Levin's 'The Philosopher's Gaze'

Sunday, September 20, 2009

Sunday September 20, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

The Appearances

scheinen
German verb:

1.  to shine; to gleam
2.  to seem; to appear….

Quine, Pursuit of Truth,
Harvard U. Press, 1990, epigraphs:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09A/090920-QuineEpigraph.jpg

Google search:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09A/090920-SozeinChi.jpg

Owen Barfield,
Saving the Appearances:
http://www.log24.com/log/pix09A/090920-Barfield.jpg

George S. Lensing,
Wallace Stevens and the Seasons:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09A/090920-Stevens.jpg

"Poetry is often a revelation  
of the elements of appearance."

Sunday September 20, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Der Einsatz

Motto of Plato's Academy: 'Let no one ignorant of geometry enter'

The 3x3 grid

Nichts ist wie es scheint.

Friday, July 31, 2009

Friday July 31, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:09 PM
Again with the…

ALLURE

at The New York Times.

For previous notes on
allure at the Times, see
St. Luke’s Day, 2008,
and its links.

Teaser at the top of
this afternoon’s Times’s
online front page:

Vampires Never Die:
In our fast-paced society,
eternity has a special
allure.” (With fanged
illustration)–

NYT teaser, 'Vampires Never Die'

Yesterday’s afternoon entry was
related to both the July 13th death
of avant-garde artist Dash Snow
and the beauty of Suzanne Vega.

A reference to Vega’s album
“Beauty & Crime” apppeared here
on the date of Snow’s death.
(See “Terrible End for an
Enfant Terrible
,” NY Times,
story dated July 24.)

The Vega entry yesterday was, in
part, a reference to that context.

Suzanne Vega album cover, 'Beauty and Crime'

In view of today’s Times
teaser, the large picture of
Vega shown here yesterday
(a detail of the above cover)
seems less an image of
pure beauty than of, well,
a lure… specifically, a
vampire lure:

Suzanne Vega as Vampire Bait

What healthy vampire
could resist that neck?

To me, the key words in the
Times teaser are “allure”
(discussed above) and “eternity.”

For both allure and eternity
in the same picture
(with interpretive
symbols added above)
see this journal on
January 31, 2008:

Abstract Symbols of Time and Eternity

Jean Simmons and Deborah Kerr in Black Narcissus

This image from “Black Narcissus”
casts Jean Simmons as Allure
and Deborah Kerr, in a pretty
contrast, as Eternity.

For different approaches to
these concepts, see Simmons
and Kerr in other films,
notably those co-starring
Burt Lancaster.

Lancaster seems to have had
a pretty good grasp of Allure
in his films with Simmons
and Kerr. For Eternity, see
“Rocket Gibraltar” and
“Field of Dreams.”

For less heterosexual approaches
to these concepts, see the
continuing culture coverage of
the Times— for instance, the
vampire essay above and the
Times‘s remarks Monday on
choreographer Merce Cunningham–
who always reminded me of
 Carmen Ghia in “The Producers”–

Carmen Ghia from 'The Producers'

Related material:

“Dance of the Vampires”
in “At the Still Point”
 (this journal, 1/16/03).

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Tuesday July 28, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:00 AM
Monumental
Anniversary

Four hundredth anniversary of the Sea Venture's shipwreck at Bermuda

The Associated Press this morning —

“Today’s Highlight in History:

On July 28, 1609, the English ship Sea Venture, commanded by Admiral Sir George Somers, ran ashore on Bermuda after nearly foundering at sea during a storm.”

“… the Sea Venture story is two tales in one. There’s the hurricane at sea, and then there is the Bermuda wreck becoming an inspiration for ‘The Tempest.’ The first is one of the most dramatic adventures of the era, and the second is a fascinating detective story.”

Robert Sean Brazil, scholar


“It has been a commonplace in English literary criticism that Shakespeare’s play, ‘The Tempest,’ was modeled on these accounts…. However, this common wisdom is almost certainly a falsity. A monumental error.”
Related material:

Plot summary by “Anonymous” at imdb.com of a feminist film version of “The Tempest” (now in post-production):

“In Julie Taymor’s version of ‘The Tempest,’ the gender of Prospero has been switched to Prospera. Going back to the 16th or 17th century, women practicing the magical arts of alchemy were often convicted of witchcraft.”

Taymor’s “Tempest” stars, as Prospera, the famed portrayer of monarchs Helen Mirren. Another work dealing with alchemy suitable for Mirren (who is also known as Detective Inspector Jane Tennison):

The Eight, by Katherine Neville, is perhaps the greatest bad novel of the twentieth century. If it were made into a movie, who should be cast as the Black Queen? (“…the dignified silver-haired woman danced sinuously…” — p. 241)


'Prime Suspect'-- Helen Mirren as Inspector Tennison

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

Tuesday July 14, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:29 PM
Herschel’s Onion

The Herschel Chronicle, by Constance A. Lubbock, Cambridge University Press, 1933, page 139:

“Sir John Herschel has recorded that his father [astronomer William Herschel, 1738-1822], when observing at Datchet, ‘when the waters were out round his garden, used to rub himself all over, face and hands &c., with a raw onion, to keep off the infection of the ague, which was then prevalent; however he caught it at last.'”

Herschel and his onion appear in a large illustration on the cover of next Sunday’s New York Times Book Review.  A review, titled “Science and the Sublime,” states that Herschel and his sister

“spent endless hours at the enormous telescopes that Herschel constructed, rubbing raw onions to warm their hands….'”

Clearly the anti-ague motive makes more sense.

A quotation from the book under review, The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science (published today, Bastille Day, 2009):

“The emphasis of on [sic] secular, humanist (even atheist) body of knowledge… was particularly strong in revolutionary France.”

This, apparently, is the terror part.

A related quotation from Publishers Weekly:

“It’s an engrossing portrait of scientists as passionate adventurers, boldly laying claim to the intellectual leadership of society. Illus. (July 14)”

On its front page next Sunday, The New York Times Book Review boldly lays claim to intellectual leadership with the following opening sentence:

“In this big two-hearted river of a book, the twin energies of scientific curiosity and poetic invention pulsate on every page.”

The sentence begins with an insult to Hemingway and ends with a cascade of vulgarized-science bullshit. Its author, Christopher Benfey, has done better, and should be ashamed.

Thursday, May 21, 2009

Thursday May 21, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:28 AM
Die
 
 Cast:

'Die,' by Tony Smith Die (Tony Smith)

Episcopal Bishop Paul Moore, Jr.

Paul Moore, Jr., retired Episcopal Bishop of New York, who died at home at 83 on the First of May, 2003

From “Secondary Structures,” by Tom Moody, Sculpture Magazine, June 2000:

“By the early ’90s, the perception of Minimalism as a ‘pure’ art untouched by history lay in tatters. The coup de grâce against the movement came not from an artwork, however, but from a text. Shortly after the removal of Richard Serra’s Tilted Arc from New York City’s Federal Plaza, Harvard art historian Anna Chave published ‘Minimalism and the Rhetoric of Power’ (Arts Magazine, January 1990), a rousing attack on the boys’ club that stops just short of a full-blown ad hominem rant. Analyzing artworks (Walter de Maria’s aluminum swastika, Morris’s ‘carceral images,’ Flavin’s phallic ‘hot rods’), critical vocabulary (Morris’s use of ‘intimacy’ as a negative, Judd’s incantatory use of the word ‘powerful’), even titles (Frank Stella’s National Socialist-tinged Arbeit Macht Frei and Reichstag), Chave highlights the disturbing undercurrents of hypermasculinity and social control beneath Minimalism’s bland exterior.  Seeing it through the eyes of the ordinary viewer, she concludes that ‘what [most] disturbs [the public at large] about Minimalist art may be what disturbs them about their own lives and times, as the face it projects is society’s blankest, steeliest face; the impersonal face of technology, industry and commerce; the unyielding face of the father: a face that is usually far more attractively masked.'”

For a more attractively masked father figure, see the Terminator series:

Father figure from the Terminator series

For further religious background,
see “Jesus and the Terminator
in Christianity Today.

Sunday, April 5, 2009

Sunday April 5, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:01 AM

About the People:
Race to Witch Mountain

"As Robert Kennedy once told a crowd of students in South Africa, it is a revolutionary world that we live in and, thus, it is young people who must take the lead– [applause]– because young people are unburdened by the biases or prejudices of the past."

President Obama in Strasbourg on Friday, April 3, 2009

"George Bernard Shaw once wrote, 'Some people see things as they are and say why? I dream things that never were and say, why not?'"

— Robert Kennedy, University of Kansas, March 18, 1968

George Bernard Shaw:

THE SNAKE. I can talk of many things. I am very wise. It was I who whispered the word to you that you did not know. Dead. Death. Die.

EVE [shuddering] Why do you remind me of it? I forgot it when I saw your beautiful hood. You must not remind me of unhappy things.

THE SERPENT. Death is not an unhappy thing when you have learnt how to conquer it.

EVE. How can I conquer it?

THE SERPENT. By another thing, called birth.

EVE. What? [Trying to pronounce it] B-birth?

THE SERPENT. Yes, birth.

EVE. What is birth?

THE SERPENT. The serpent never dies. Some day you shall see me come out of this beautiful skin, a new snake with a new and lovelier skin. That is birth.

EVE. I have seen that. It is wonderful.

THE SERPENT. If I can do that, what can I not do? I tell you I am very subtle. When you and Adam talk, I hear you say 'Why?' Always 'Why?' You see things; and you say 'Why?' But I dream things that never were; and I say 'Why not?' I made the word dead to describe my old skin that I cast when I am renewed. I call that renewal being born.

EVE. Born is a beautiful word.

THE SERPENT. Why not be born again and again as I am, new and beautiful every time?

EVE. I! It does not happen: that is why.

THE SERPENT. That is how; but it is not why. Why not?

EVE. But I should not like it. It would be nice to be new again; but my old skin would lie on the ground looking just like me; and Adam would see it shrivel up and–

THE SERPENT. No. He need not. There is a second birth.

EVE. A second birth?

THE SERPENT. Listen. I will tell you a great secret….

"Listen, I tell you a mystery…."
Saul of Tarsus   

About the People
(with apologies to
Zenna Henderson):

'Spaceships, Toddlers, Model T Cars, and Jars of Beer'

"We've got to stop meeting like this."

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Wednesday March 18, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Gallic Clarity

Yesterday’s entry Deep Structures discussed the “semiotic square,” a device that exemplifies the saying “If you can’t dazzle ’em with brilliance, then baffle ’em with bullshit.”

A search today for what the Marxist critic Fredric Jameson might have meant by saying that the square “is capable of generating at least ten conceivable positions out of a rudimentary binary opposition” leads to two documents of interest.

1. “Theory Pictures as Trails: Diagrams and the Navigation of Theoretical Narratives” (pdf), by J.R. Osborn, Department of Communication, University of California, San Diego (Cognitive Science Online, Vol.3.2, pp.15-44, 2005)

2. “The Semiotic Square” (html), by Louis Hébert (2006), professor, Université du Québec à Rimouski, in Signo (http://www.signosemio.com).

Shown below is Osborn’s picture of the semiotic square:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090318-OsbornTrails.jpg

Osborn’s discussion of the square, though more clear than, say, that of Rosalind Krauss (who reverses the bottom two parts of the square– see Deep Structures), fails. His Appendix A is miserably obscure.

On the brighter side, we have, as a sign that Gallic clarity still exists, the work of Hébert.

Here is how he approaches Jameson’s oft-quoted, but seemingly confused, remark about “ten conceivable positions”–

The Semiotic Square,”
  by Louis Hébert

1. ABSTRACT

The semiotic square, developed by Greimas and Rastier, is a means of refining oppositional analyses by increasing the number of analytical classes stemming from a given opposition from two (life/death, for instance) to four (for example, life, death, life and death (the living dead), and neither life nor death (angels)) to eight or even ten.

2. THEORY

The actantial model, isotopy and the semiotic square are undoubtedly the best-known theoretical propositions that have emerged from the Paris School of semiotics, with Greimas as its central figure. Like the actantial model and the veridictory square, the semiotic square is designed to be both a conceptual network and a visual representation of this network, usually depicted in the form of a “square” (which actually looks like a rectangle!). Courtés defines it as the visual representation of the logical structure of an opposition (cf. Courtés, 1991, 152). The semiotic square is a means of refining oppositional analyses by increasing the number of analytical classes stemming from a given opposition from two (for instance, life/death) to four (for example, life, death, life and death (the living dead), and neither life nor death (angels)) to eight or even ten. Here is an empty semiotic square.

Structure of the semiotic square

   
5. (=1+2) COMPLEX TERM
   
 
1. TERM A  
2. TERM B
 
9. (=1+4)
10. (=2+3)
 
3. TERM NOT-B  
4. TERM NOT-A
 

7. (=1+3)

POSITIVE DEIXIS

8. (=2+4) NEGATIVE DEIXIS
   
   
6. (=3+4) NEUTRAL TERM
   

LEGEND:
The + sign links the terms that are combined to make up a metaterm (a compound term); for example, 5 is the result of combining 1 and 2.

2.1 CONSTITUENT ELEMENTS

The semiotic square entails primarily the following elements (we are steering clear of the constituent relationships of the square: contrariety, contradiction, and complementarity or implication):

1. terms
2. metaterms (compound terms)
3. object(s) (classified on the square)
4. observing subject(s) (who do the classifying)
5. time (of the observation)

2.1.1 TERMS

The semiotic square is composed of four terms:

Position 1 (term A)
Position 2 (term B)
Position 3 (term not-B)
Position 4 (term not-A)

The first two terms form the opposition (the contrary relationship) that is the basis of the square, and the other two are obtained by negating each term of the opposition.

2.1.2 METATERMS

The semiotic square includes six metaterms. The metaterms are terms created from the four simple terms. Some of the metaterms have been named. (The complex term and the neutral term, despite their names, are indeed metaterms).

Position 5 (term 1 + term 2): complex term
Position 6 (term 3 + term 4): neutral term
Position 7 (term 1 + term 3): positive deixis
Position 8 (term 2 + term 4): negative deixis
Position 9 = term 1 + term 4: unnamed
Position 10 = term 2 + term 3: unnamed

These ten “positions” are apparently meant to explain Jameson’s remark.

Hébert’s treatment has considerably greater entertainment value than Osborn’s. Besides “the living dead” and angels, Hébert’s examples and exercises include vampires, transvestites, the Passion of Christ, and the following very relevant quotation:

“Simply let your ‘Yes’ be ‘Yes,’ and your ‘No,’ ‘No’; anything beyond this comes from the evil one.” (Matthew 5:37)

Monday, February 23, 2009

Monday February 23, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:22 PM
Another Manic Monday
McGee and Smee 

Project MUSE —

and interpretations, “any of the
Zingari shoolerim [gypsy schoolchildren]
may pick a peck of kindlings yet from the
sack of auld hensyne” (FW 112.4-8).

— Patrick McGee, “Reading Authority:
Feminism and Joyce,” MFS: Modern
Fiction Studies
— Volume 35, Number 3,
Fall 1989, pp. 421-436, The Johns Hopkins
University Press

McGee Thanks the Academy:

“The ulterior motive behind this essay [“Reading Authority,” above], the purpose for which I seize this occasion, concerns the question or problem of authority. I stress at the outset my understanding of authority as the constructed repository of value or foundation of a system of values, the final effect of fetishism– in this case, literary fetishism. [Cf. Marx, Das Kapital] Reading– as in the phrase ‘reading authority’– should be grasped as the institutionally determined act of constructing authority….”

Wikipedia:

“[In Peter Pan] Smee is Captain Hook’s right-hand man… Barrie describes him as ‘Irish’ and ‘a man who stabbed without offence‘….”

Background: In yesterday’s morning entry, James Joyce as Jesuit, with “Dagger Definitions.”

A different Smee appears as an art critic in yesterday’s afternoon entry “Design Theory.”–

Smee Stabs Without Offence:

“Brock, who has a brisk mind, is a man on a mission. He read mathematical economics and political philosophy at Princeton (he has five degrees in all) and is the founder and president of Strategic Economic Decisions Inc., a think tank specializing in applying the economics of uncertainty to forecasting and risk assessment.

But phooey to all that; Brock has deeper things to think about. He believes he has cracked the secret of beautiful design. He even has equations and graphs to prove it.”

A Jesuit in Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man:

“When may we expect to have something from you on the esthetic question?”

Beckett Bethicketted:

“Our entanglement in the wilderness of Finnegans Wake is exemplified by the neologism ‘Bethicket.’ This word condenses a range of possible meanings and reinforces a diversity of possible syntactic interpretations. Joyce seems to allude to Beckett, creating a portmanteau word that melds ‘Beckett’ with ‘thicket’ (continuing the undergrowth metaphor), ‘thick’ (adding mental density to floral density)…. As a single word ‘Bethicket’ contains the confusion that its context suggests. On the one hand, ‘Bethicket me for a stump of a beech’ has the sound of a proverbial expletive that might mean something like ‘I’ll be damned’ or ‘Well, I’ll be a son of a gun.’….”

Stephen Dilks

Winslet, Penn, and Cruz at the Oscars, 2009

At the Oscars, 2009

Related material:

Frame Tales and Dickung

Tuesday, December 23, 2008

Tuesday December 23, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:20 AM

Kindred Spirit

On the late film director Robert Mulligan, who died early Saturday [Dec. 20, 2008] at 83:

Mulligan received a best director Oscar nomination in 1963 for “[To Kill a] Mockingbird”….

While some debated whether he had a discernible personal vision in his films, Mulligan was known for his casting and direction of children, including “[Up the Down] Staircase,” where he personally interviewed more than 500 New York high school students.

Sensing a kindred spirit, Francois Truffaut was a vocal champion, particularly cognizant of what he perceived as undue criticism of Mulligan’s work for lacking a particular “style.” Mulligan himself was dismissive of critics/cineaste talk: “I don’t know anything about ‘the Mulligan style,’ ” he told the Village Voice in 1978. “If you can find it, well, that’s your job.”

Duane Byrge, The Hollywood Reporter

Thanks to desconvencida for a trailer of “The Man in the Moon” (1991), Reese Witherspoon’s first film and Mulligan’s last.

Mulligan also directed Natalie Wood in a personal favorite of mine, “Love with the Proper Stranger.”

Monday, August 4, 2008

Monday August 4, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:57 AM

Summer of ’36

Another Opening
of Another Show

“When I cast my mind back to that summer of 1936 different kinds of memories offer themselves to me. We got our first wireless set that summer– well, a sort of a set; and it obsessed us. And because it arrived as August was about to begin, my Aunt Maggie– she was the joker of the family– she suggested we give it a name. She wanted to call it Lugh after the old Celtic God of the Harvest. Because in the old days August the First was La Lughnasa, the feast day of the pagan god, Lugh; and the days and weeks of harvesting that followed were called the Festival of Lughnasa.”

— Michael in the play
 “Dancing at Lughnasa”

From the film “Contact”–

Jodie Foster in 'Contact' viewing the opening of the 1936 Olympics

Jodie Foster and the
opening of the 1936 Olympics

“Heraclitus…. says: ‘The ruler
 whose prophecy occurs at Delphi
 oute legei oute kryptei,
 neither gathers nor hides,
 alla semainei, but gives hints.'”
 — An Introduction to Metaphysics,
 by Martin Heidegger, Yale University
 Press paperback, 1959, p. 170

Sunday, May 25, 2008

Sunday May 25, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 6:30 PM
Hall of Mirrors

Epigraph to
Deploying the Glass Bead Game, Part II,”
by Robert de Marrais:

“For a complete logical argument,”
Arthur began
with admirable solemnity,
“we need two prim Misses –”
“Of course!” she interrupted.
“I remember that word now.
And they produce — ?”
“A Delusion,” said Arthur.

— Lewis Carroll,
Sylvie and Bruno

Prim Miss 1:

Erin O’Connor’s weblog
“Critical Mass” on May 24:

Roger Rosenblatt’s Beet [Ecco hardcover, Jan. 29, 2008] is the latest addition to the noble sub-genre of campus fiction….

Curricular questions and the behavior of committees are at once dry as dust subjects and areas ripe for sarcastic send-up– not least because, as dull as they are, they are really both quite vital to the credibility and viability of higher education.

Here’s an excerpt from the first meeting, in which committee members propose their personal plans for a new, improved curriculum:

“… Once the students really got into playing with toy soldiers, they would understand history with hands-on excitement.”

To demonstrate his idea, he’d brought along a shoe box full of toy doughboys and grenadiers, and was about to reenact the Battle of Verdun on the committee table when Heilbrun stayed his hand. “We get it,” he said.

“That’s quite interesting, Molton,” said Booth [a chemist]. “But is it rigorous enough?”

At the mention of the word, everyone, save Peace, sat up straight.

“Rigor is so important,” said Kettlegorf.

“We must have rigor,” said Booth.

“You may be sure,” said the offended Kramer. “I never would propose anything lacking rigor.”

Smythe inhaled and looked at the ceiling. “I think I may have something of interest,” he said, as if he were at a poker game and was about to disclose a royal flush. “My proposal is called ‘Icons of Taste.’ It would consist of a galaxy of courses affixed to several departments consisting of lectures on examples of music, art, architecture, literature, and other cultural areas a student needed to indicate that he or she was sophisticated.”

“Why would a student want to do that?” asked Booth.

“Perhaps sophistication is not a problem for chemists,” said Smythe. Lipman tittered.

“What’s the subject matter?” asked Heilbrun. “Would it have rigor?”

“Of course it would have rigor. Yet it would also attract those additional students Bollovate is talking about.” Smythe inhaled again. “The material would be carefully selected,” he said. “One would need to pick out cultural icons the students were likely to bring up in conversation for the rest of their lives, so that when they spoke, others would recognize their taste as being exquisite yet eclectic and unpredictable.”

“You mean Rembrandt?” said Kramer.

Smythe smiled with weary contempt. “No, I do not mean Rembrandt. I don’t mean Beethoven or Shakespeare, either, unless something iconic has emerged about them to justify their more general appeal.”

“You mean, if they appeared on posters,” said Lipman.

“That’s it, precisely.”

Lipman blushed with pride.

“The subject matter would be fairly easy to amass,” Smythe said. “We could all make up a list off the top of our heads. Einstein–who does have a poster.” He nodded to the ecstatic Lipman. “Auden, for the same reason. Students would need to be able to quote ‘September 1939[ or at least the last lines. And it would be good to teach ‘Musee des Beaux Arts’ as well, which is off the beaten path, but not garishly. Mahler certainly. But Cole Porter too. And Sondheim, I think. Goya. Warhol, it goes without saying, Stephen Hawking, Kurosawa, Bergman, Bette Davis. They’d have to come up with some lines from Dark Victory, or better still, Jezebel. La Dolce Vita. Casablanca. King of Hearts. And Orson, naturally. Citizen Kane, I suppose, though personally I prefer F for Fake.”

“Judy!” cried Heilbrun.

“Yes, Judy too. But not ‘Over the Rainbow.’ It would be more impressive for them to do ‘The Trolley Song,’ don’t you think?” Kettlegorf hummed the intro.

Guernica,” said Kramer. “Robert Capa.” Eight-limbed asterisk

“Edward R. Murrow,” said Lipman.

“No! Don’t be ridiculous!” said Smythe, ending Lipman’s brief foray into the world of respectable thought.

“Marilyn Monroe!” said Kettlegorf.

“Absolutely!” said Smythe, clapping to indicate his approval.

“And the Brooklyn Bridge,” said Booth, catching on. “And the Chrysler Building.”

“Maybe,” said Smythe. “But I wonder if the Chrysler Building isn’t becoming something of a cliche.”

Peace had had enough. “And you want students to nail this stuff so they’ll do well at cocktail parties?”

Smythe sniffed criticism, always a tetchy moment for him. “You make it sound so superficial,” he said.

Prim Miss 2:

Siri Hustvedt speaks at Adelaide Writers’ Week– a story dated March 24, 2008

“I have come to think of my books as echo chambers or halls of mirrors in which themes, ideas, associations continually reflect and reverberate inside a text. There is always point and counterpoint, to use a musical illustration. There is always repetition with difference.”

A Delusion:

Exercise — Identify in the following article the sentence that one might (by unfairly taking it out of context) argue is a delusion.

(Hint: See Reflection Groups in Finite Geometry.)

A. V. Borovik, 'Maroids and Coxeter Groups'

Why Borovik’s Figure 4
is included above:

Euclid, Peirce, L’Engle:
No Royal Roads.

For more on Prim Miss 2
and deploying
the Glass Bead Game,
see the previous entry.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/images/asterisk8.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. And now, perhaps, his brother Cornell Capa, who died Friday.

 Related material: Log24 on March 24– Death and the Apple Tree— with an excerpt from
George MacDonald, and an essay by David L. Neuhouser mentioning the influence of MacDonald on Lewis Carroll– Lewis Carroll: Author, Mathematician, and Christian (pdf).

Friday, December 14, 2007

Friday December 14, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

“Well, it changes.”

Nicole Kidman at a press conference
for the London premiere of
“The Golden Compass” on November 27:

Nicole Kidman'-- kittens and tiger

A related Log24 link from
that same date, November 27:

Deep Beauty

See also Zen and the Art of
Motorcycle Maintenance

“Plato hadn’t tried to destroy areté. He had encapsulated it; made a permanent, fixed Idea out of it; had converted it to a rigid, immobile Immortal Truth. He made areté the Good, the highest form, the highest Idea of all. It was subordinate only to Truth itself, in a synthesis of all that had gone before.That was why the Quality that Phaedrus had arrived at in the classroom had seemed so close to Plato’s Good. Plato’s Good was taken from the rhetoricians. Phaedrus searched, but could find no previous cosmologists who had talked about the Good. That was from the Sophists. The difference was that Plato’s Good was a fixed and eternal and unmoving Idea, whereas for the rhetoricians it was not an Idea at all. The Good was not a form of reality. It was reality itself, ever changing, ultimately unknowable in any kind of fixed, rigid way.”

— as well as Cold Mountain

Page 48: “It’s claimed that if
you take a mirror and look
backwards into a well, you’ll
see your future down in the water.”

“So in short order Ada found herself bent backward over the mossy well lip, canted in a pose with little to recommend it in the way of dignity or comfort, back arched, hips forward, legs spraddled for balance.  She held a hand mirror above her face, angled to catch the surface of the water below.

Ada had agreed to the well-viewing as a variety of experiment in local custom and as a tonic for her gloom. Her thoughts had been broody and morbid and excessively retrospective for so long that she welcomed the chance to run counter to that flow, to cast forward and think about the future, even though she expected to see nothing but water at the bottom of the well.

She shifted her feet to find better grip on the packed dirt of the yard and then tried to look into the mirror.  The white sky above was skimmed over with backlit haze, bright as a pearl or as a silver mirror itself.  The dark foliage of oaks all around the edges framed the sky, duplicating the wooden frame of the mirror into which Ada peered, examining its picture of the well depths behind her to see what might lie ahead in her life. The bright round of well water at the end of the black shaft was another mirror.  It cast back the shine of sky and was furred around the edges here and there with sprigs of fern growing between stones.

Ada tried to focus her attention on the hand mirror, but the bright sky beyond kept drawing her eye away.  She was dazzled by light and shade, by the confusing duplication of reflections and of frames. All coming from too many directions for the mind to take account of. The various images bounced against each other until she felt a desperate vertigo, as if she could at any moment pitch backward and plunge head first down the well shaft and drown there, the sky far above her, her last vision but a bright circle set in the dark, no bigger than a full moon.

Her head spun and she reached with her free hand and held to the stonework of the well.  And then just for a moment things steadied, and there indeed seemed to be a picture in the mirror.”

— and Log24 on December 3 —

I Ching Hexagram 48: The Well
The above Chinese character
stands for Hexagram 48, “The Well.”
For further details, click on the well.

Saturday, November 24, 2007

Saturday November 24, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:06 AM
Standards

“The undermining of
standards of seriousness
is almost complete.”
Susan Sontag

Doonesbury 11/23/07:
 
http://www.log24.com/log/pix07A/071123-Doonesbury34.gif

For standards of comedy,
see Angels in Arabia.

For standards of tragicomedy,
see Molly Ivins on the owner
of Condé Nast Publications:

Murray Kempton once observed,
‘I think Si Newhouse has
lost his moral compass
since Roy Cohn died.'”
Molly Ivins

“Lovely.
Just lovely.”
 

 

 


Devil’s Advocate

Happy Holidays from Roy Cohn,
Mike Nichols, Al Pacino, and Elvis:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix07A/071124-MurrayElvis.jpg

“Thousands have impersonated Elvis Presley over the years. Now, Bill Murray offers his own indelible tribute to the king of rock ‘n’ roll– on the cover of Condé Nast’s new music/movie magazine, Movies Rock.

The magazine, which covers music and its impact on filmmaking, launches in November as a supplement in the December subscriber issues of 14 Condé Nast publications.”

Wednesday, October 24, 2007

Wednesday October 24, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:01 AM
This morning's online
New York Times

R. B. Kitaj, Painter of Moody Human Dramas, Dies at 74

Ileana Sonnabend, Art World Figure, Dies at 92

Ileana Sonnabend's eye, shrewdness and lasting alliance with her first husband, Leo Castelli, made her one of the most formidable contemporary art dealers of her time.

Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress