Log24

Friday, November 14, 2008

Friday November 14, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 AM

Riverrun
 

(The first word in Finnegans Wake.
S
ee also the Log24 entries following
the death of Pope John Paul II.)

At Inside Higher Ed, Margaret Soltan ("UD") discusses…

"moments of clarity [cf. related essay (pdf)] that seem, when you look at all of them together late in the day, to disclose our life’s otherwise hidden pattern, meaning, and flow.

'Not far downstream was a dry channel where the river had run once, and part of the way to come to know a thing is through its death. But years ago I had known the river when it flowed through this now dry channel, so I could enliven its stony remains with the waters of memory. In death it had its pattern, and we can only hope for as much.'"

A River Runs Through It, by Norman Maclean, a story about trout fishing and grace

Related material:

Maclean's fellow author Kilgore Trout and the story he is said to be most proud of, about Bunker Bingo.

See also yesterday's entry, Bob's Country Bunker, and On Linguistic Creation.

Tuesday, April 5, 2005

Tuesday April 5, 2005

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 3:17 PM
Art History:
The Pope of Hope

At the Vatican on
Shakespeare's Birthday
(See Log24.net,
Oct. 4, 2002)

See also the iconology
what Dan Brown in
The Da Vinci Code
  calls "symbology" —
of Pandora's Box
at Log24.net,
March 10, 2005:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050310-Nell2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 

"Man and woman are a pair of locked caskets,
each containing the key to the other."

Baroness Karen Blixen

"Karol Wojtyla had looked into
the heart of darkness–
and at the heart of darkness
discovered reason
for an indomitable hope.

He lived on the far side of
the greatest catastrophe
in human history,
the death of the Son of God,
and knew that evil
did not have the last word.
This is the key…."

Richard John Neuhaus,
April 4, 2005

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050405-JoyceGeometry.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Finnegans Wake, p. 293,
"the lazily eye of his lapis"

 

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050403-StPetersSq3.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 

Perette Elizabeth Michelli on the Ovato Tondo:

 

"Notice how the Pope turns out to be
at the center of the breaking and
redefining of the Classical system."

"Derrida on Plato on writing says 'In order for these contrary values (good/evil, true/false, essence/appearance, inside/outside, etc.) to be in opposition, each of the terms must be simply EXTERNAL to the other, which means that one of these oppositions (the opposition between inside and outside) must already be accredited as the matrix of all possible opposition.' "

Peter J. Leithart

See also


Skewed Mirrors
,
Sept. 14, 2003

"Evil did not  have the last word."
Richard John Neuhaus, April 4, 2005

Lps. The keys to. Given! A way a lone
a last a loved a long the

PARIS,
1922-1939

"There is never any ending to Paris."
— Ernest Hemingway

For the first word, see Louis Armand on
Lethe, erinnerung, and riverrun.

See also the following passage,
linked to on the Easter Vigil, 2005:

  You will find to the left of the House of Hades
    a spring,
  And by the side thereof standing
    a white cypress.
  To this spring approach not near.
  But you shall find another,
    from the lake of Memory
  Cold water flowing forth, and there are
    guardians before it.
  Say, "I am a child of Earth and starry Heaven;
  But my race is of Heaven alone.
    This you know yourselves.
  But I am parched with thirst and I perish.
    Give me quickly
  The cold water flowing forth
    from the lake of Memory."

Tuesday, March 22, 2005

Tuesday March 22, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 PM
The Enemy

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050322-Derrida.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

See Remembering Jacques Derrida.

"There is no teacher but the enemy."

— Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game,
   Tor paperback reprint, 1994, p. 262

"Différance is, for Derrida, the key concept
in order to understand what is here at stake."

Lacan The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050322-Diamond.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors. Derrida, by Frida Saal

The following entries from October 2004
are related to the death of Jacques Derrida.

 

Saturday, October 9, 2004  6:40 PM

Derrida Dead

"Jacques Derrida, the Algerian-born, French intellectual who became one of the most celebrated and unfathomable philosophers of the late 20th century, died Friday at a Paris hospital, the French president's office announced. He was 74."

— Jonathan Kandell, New York Times

"There is no teacher but the enemy."

— Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game,
   Tor paperback reprint, 1994, p. 262
 


Saturday, October 9, 2004  2:22 AM

Belief

KERRY: "I'm going to be a president who believes in science."

KERRY: "I'm a Catholic – raised a Catholic. I was an altar boy. Religion has been a huge part of my life, helped lead me through a war, leads me today."

BUSH: "Trying to decipher that."
 


Friday, October 8, 2004  5:07 PM

Behush the Bush
 

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/041008-JoyceBush.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
James Joyce statue, Zurich

"There's where. First.
We pass through grass
behush the bush to."
— Final page of
Finnegans Wake

"… we all gain an appreciation of how each of us can provide readings that others are blind to and how each of us is temporarily blind to other feasible readings. Reading the text becomes a communal act of discovery….

No one has much to say, for now, about the grass reference…."

Reading Finnegans Wake (1986)

The phrase "snake in the grass" seems relevant, as does the opening of Finnegans Wake:

riverrun, past Eve and Adam's….

Related material:

Joyce and Tao,

Why Me?,

Serpent's Tail Publishing,

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/041008-Serpent.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

and, for Matt Damon,
whose birthday is today —

The Joyce Identity.
 

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