Log24

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Midnight Special

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Primitive roots modulo 17

From a Log24 search for "Midnight Special."

Update of 12:45 AM the same night —

"I appreciate simple, iconic and timeless forms —
things that can adapt or serve multiple purposes
and avoid being easily labelled. At the same time,
I love parts and fragments that reveal how things
move or work. Mostly, anything that tells its
own story and isn’t generalized or clad in some
sort of ornamental icing."

— Charlottesville, VA, architect Fred Wolf, who seems
to have been associated with the business name
"Gauss LLC " in Charlottesville.

And I  appreciate bulk apperception.

Sunday, January 19, 2014

Deep Beauty

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

(Continued

Old punchline:  "Spell chrysanthemum."
Variation:  "Spell coordinatization."

Related test:  Chrysanthemum Coordinatization —

The image �http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060604-Primitive.gif� cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Context Root circle.

Monday, July 15, 2013

Tag

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:30 PM

Some recent posts have been added to the Root Circle saga.

Update of 12:13 AM July 16, 2013:

Click the above image for further details. This "every other term"
strategy may be illustrated as in the July 12, 2013, post "Ein Bild "—

The image �http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060604-Primitive.gif� cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

This  image was originally posted on June 5, 2006 at 12:06 AM ET.

Saturday, July 13, 2013

Circles

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:22 AM

A sort of poem
by Gauss and Weyl —

Click the circle for the context in Weyl's Symmetry .

For related remarks, see the previous post.

A literary excursus—

Brad Leithauser in a New Yorker  post of July 11, 2013:

Reading Poems Backward

If a poet determines that a poem should begin at point A and conclude at point D, say, the mystery of how to get there—how to pass felicitously through points B and C—strikes me as an artistic task both genuine and enlivening. There are fertile mysteries of transition, no less than of termination.

And I’d like to suppose that Frost himself would recognize that any ingress into a poem is better than being locked out entirely. His little two-liner, “The Secret,” suggests as much: “We dance round in a ring and suppose / But the Secret sits in the middle and knows.” Most truly good poems might be said to contain a secret: the little sacramental miracle by which you connect, intimately, with the words of a total stranger. And whether you come at the poem frontward, or backward, or inside out—whether you approach it deliberately, word by word and line by line, or you parachute into it borne on a sudden breeze from the island of Serendip—surely isn’t the important thing. What matters is whether you achieve entrance into its inner ring, and there repose companionably beside the Secret.

One should try, of course, to avoid repose in an inner circle of Hell .

Friday, July 12, 2013

Ein Bild

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 7:11 PM

A rhetorical question from this journal—

"Und was für ein Bild des Christentums
ist dabei herausgekommen?"

A rhetorical answer from this journal (June 5, 2006)—

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Material closely related to the above rhetorical answer—

(Click for clearer image.)

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Nachthexen

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 2:01 PM

From a Telegraph  obituary about a death on July 8, 2013:

"The pilots’ tactic was to fly to within a certain distance of the target, and cut their engines. They would then glide in silently, release their bombs, then restart their engines and fly home. The Germans called them the 'Nachthexen' (the Night Witches) due to the whooshing sound they made— 'like a witch’s broomstick in the night'— as they flew past. There was, supposedly, a promise to award an Iron Cross to any Luftwaffe pilot who actually managed to bring down a Night Witch."

In memoriam:

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Roots

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 10:10 AM

This journal on June 24, 2006—

Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance , 1974:

"But what's happening is that each year our old flat earth of
conventional reason becomes less and less adequate to handle
the experiences we have and this is creating widespread feelings
of topsy-turviness. As a result we're getting more and more people
in irrational areas of thought… occultism, mysticism, drug changes
and the like… because they feel the inadequacy of classical reason
to handle what they know are real experiences."

"I'm not sure what you mean by classical reason."

"Analytic reason, dialectic reason. Reason which at the University
is sometimes considered to be the whole of understanding. You've
never had  to understand it really. It's always been completely
bankrupt with regard to abstract art. Nonrepresentative art is one of
the root experiences I'm talking about. Some people still condemn it
because it doesn’t make 'sense.' But what's really wrong is not
the art but the 'sense,' the classical reason, which can't grasp it.
People keep looking for branch extensions of reason that will cover
art's more recent occurrences, but the answers aren't in  the
branches, they're at the roots."

See also an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art that opened Dec. 23—

— and an exhibition in this journal of the image "Root Circle."

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Where Credit Is Due…

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

The Dick Medal

Review of the film "Knowing" from 2009—

Nicolas Cage's character, an astrophysicist, looks at a chart (written 50 years earlier by a child) with a colleague and points out a chronologically correct prediction of the date and number of dead in world wide tragedies over the last fifty years, and his colleague's response is "Systems that find meaning in numbers are a dime a dozen. Why? Because people see what they want to see." Well that would be a pretty neat trick. You could build a career on that in a Vegas showroom.

Summary of the film "Next"

Film Title:  Next
Based on the 1954 short story
"The Golden Man" by Philip K. Dick

Release Date:
April 27, 2007

About the Film:
Nicolas Cage stars as Cris Johnson, a Las Vegas magician with a secret gift that is both a blessing and a curse: He has the uncanny ability to tell you what happens next.

Related material from this journal on the release date of "Next"— April 27, 2007


Production Credits:

Thanks to the
Pennsylvania Lottery for
  today’s suggestion of links 
to the dates 9/15 and 6/06–

PA lottery April 27, 2007: Midday 915, Evening 606

– and to
Hermann Weyl
for the illustration
from 6/06 (D-Day)
underlying the
following “gold medal”
from 9/15, 2006:

Medal of 9/15/06

"It’s almost enough to make you think that time present and time past might both be present in time future. As someone may have said."

— David Orr, "The Age of Citation"

Saturday, May 22, 2010

In the Details

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 10:31 AM

Today's New York Times

Byzantine

"…there were fresh questions about whether the intelligence overhaul that created the post of national intelligence director was fatally flawed, and whether Mr. Obama would move gradually to further weaken the authorities granted to the director and give additional power to individual spy agencies like the Central Intelligence Agency. Mr. Blair and each of his predecessors have lamented openly that the intelligence director does not have enough power to deliver the intended shock therapy to America’s byzantine spying apparatus."

Catch-22 in Doonesbury today—

Image-- Chaplain and doctor in Doonesbury

From Log24 on Jan. 5, 2010—
   Artifice of Eternity

A Medal

In memory of Byzantine scholar Ihor Sevcenko,
who died at 87 on St. Stephen's Day, 2009–

Image-- Cross-in-circle design based on figure in Weyl's 'Symmetry'

Thie above image results from a Byzantine
meditation based on a detail in the previous post

Image-- 'Lyche Gate' with asterisk, from Google Books, digitized April 24, 2008

 

Image-- The Case of the Lyche Gate Asterisk

"This might be a good time to
call it a day." –Today's Doonesbury

"TOMORROW ALWAYS BELONGS TO US"
Title of an exhibition by young Nordic artists
in Sweden during the summer of 2008.

The exhibition included, notably, Josefine Lyche.

Tuesday, January 5, 2010

Artifice of Eternity

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 7:59 AM

A Medal

In memory of Byzantine scholar Ihor Sevcenko,
who died at 87 on St. Stephen's Day, 2009–

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060915-Roots.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

William Grimes on Sevcenko in this morning's New York Times:

"Perhaps his most fascinating, if uncharacteristic, literary contribution came shortly after World War II, when he worked with Ukrainians stranded in camps in Germany for displaced persons.

In April 1946 he sent a letter to Orwell, asking his permission to translate 'Animal Farm' into Ukrainian for distribution in the camps. The idea instantly appealed to Orwell, who not only refused to accept any royalties but later agreed to write a preface for the edition. It remains his most detailed, searching discussion of the book."

See also a rather different medal discussed
here in the context of an Orwellian headline from
The New York Times on Christmas morning,
the day before Sevcenko died.
That headline, at the top of the online front page,
was "Arthur Koestler, Man of Darkness."

Leibniz, design for medallion showing binary numbers as an 'imago creationis'

The medal, offered as an example of brightness
to counteract the darkness of the Times, was designed
by Leibniz in honor of his discovery of binary arithmetic.
See Brightness at Noon and Brightness continued.

"By groping toward the light we are made to realize
how deep the darkness is around us."
— Arthur Koestler, The Call Girls: A Tragi-Comedy,
Random House, 1973, page 118

Saturday, June 14, 2008

Saturday June 14, 2008

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:09 AM
Cross and Wheel

An online tribute to Tim Russert
this morning had a song by a
Russert favorite, Bruce Springsteen:

 

"Wearin' the cross
of my calling,
on wheels of fire
 I come rollin' down here."

—  "The Rising"
 

Related material:

Hard Lessons

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/061003-Lesson.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 and the
five Log24 entries
ending on July 20, 2006,
which contain the following
example of what might be
caled "sacred order"
(see yesterday's entries)–

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060604-Roots.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

See also "Grave Matters" here
on November 8, 2006, and
the same date four years earlier,
as well as
"O Grave, Where Is Thy Victory?"
(pdf), a lecture by Jack Miles
at Clark Art Institute
(see Oct. 7-9, 2002)
on November 9, 2002.

The Miles lecture may be of
more comfort to Russert's
mourners than the
cross/wheel symbolism,
which has its dark side.

The cross, the wheel,
the Catholic faith, and
Russert's field of expertise,
politics, are of course
notably combined in the
crux gammata, discussed
here in a 2002 entry on
the Triumph of the Cross
and the Death of Grace

(Princess of Monaco).
 

Sunday, June 24, 2007

Sunday June 24, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:07 AM
Midsummer Night
in the Garden
of Good and Evil

Midsummer Night in the Garden of Good and Evil

"I Put a Spell on You"
— Nina Simone,
title of autobiograpy

"The voodoo priestess looked across the table at her wealthy client, a man on trial for murder: 'Now, you know how dead time works. Dead time lasts for one hour– from half an hour before midnight to half an hour after midnight. The half-hour before midnight is for doin' good. The half-hour after midnight is for doin' evil….'"

— Glenna Whitley, "Voodoo Justice," The New York Times, March 20, 1994
 

Last year on this date:

Zen and the Art:

Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, 1974:

"But what's happening is that each year our old flat earth of conventional reason becomes less and less adequate to handle the experiences we have and this is creating widespread feelings of topsy-turviness. As a result we're getting more and more people in irrational areas of thought… occultism, mysticism, drug changes and the like… because they feel the inadequacy of classical reason to handle what they know are real experiences."

"I'm not sure what you mean by classical reason."

"Analytic reason, dialectic reason. Reason which at the University is sometimes considered to be the whole of understanding. You've never had to understand it really. It's always been completely bankrupt with regard to abstract art. Nonrepresentative art is one of the root experiences I'm talking about. Some people still condemn it because it doesn’t make 'sense.' But what's really wrong is not the art but the 'sense,' the classical reason, which can't grasp it. People keep looking for branch extensions of reason that will cover art's more recent occurrences, but the answers aren't in the branches, they're at the roots."

Primitive roots modulo 17

Related material:

D-Day Morning,
Figures of Speech,
Ursprache Revisited.

See also
the midnight entry
of June 23-24, 2006:

"Let the midnight special
shine her light on me."

Nina Simone and eight-point star

Nina Simone
 

Friday, April 27, 2007

Friday April 27, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:48 PM
Production Credits:

Thanks to the
Pennsylvania Lottery for
  today's suggestion of links 
to the dates 9/15 and 6/06–

PA lottery April 27, 2007: Midday 915, Evening 606

— and to
Hermann Weyl
for the illustration
from 6/06 (D-Day)
underlying the
following "gold medal"
from 9/15, 2006:

Medal of 9/15/06
.

Tuesday, April 3, 2007

Tuesday April 3, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 10:10 PM
Our Judeo-Christian
  Heritage –
 
Lottery
Hermeneutics

Part I: Judeo

The Lottery 12/9/06
Mid-day
Evening
New York
036

See

The Quest
for the 36

331

See 3/31

"square crystal" and "the symbolism could not have been more perfect."

Pennsylvania
602

See 6/02

Walter Benjamin
on
"Adamic language."

111

See 1/11

"Related material:
Jung's Imago and Solomon's Cube."


Part II: Christian


The Lottery 4/3/07 Mid-day
Evening
New York
115

See 1/15

Inscape

017

See

The image “Primitive roots modulo 17

Pennsylvania 604

See
6/04

Death Valley and the Fisher King

714

See
7/14

Happy Birthday, Esther Dyson


Part III:
Imago Dei


Jung's Four-Diamonds Figure


Click on picture
for details.

Related material:

It is perhaps relevant to
this Holy Week that the
date 6/04 (2006) above
refers to both the Christian
holy day of Pentecost and
to the day of the
facetious baccalaureate
of the Class of 2006 in
the University Chapel
at Princeton.

For further context for the
Log24 remarks of that same
date, see June 1-15, 2006.

Monday, November 20, 2006

Monday November 20, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 7:20 PM

Triumphs

Yesterday's link to a Log24 entry for the Feast of the Triumph of the Cross led to the following figure:
 

Primitive roots modulo 17
(Based on Weyl's Symmetry)

Today, an entry in the The New Criterion's weblog tells of Hilton Kramer's new collection of essays on art, The Triumph of Modernism.

From a Booklist review:

Kramer "celebrates the revelations of modern art, defining modernism as nothing less than 'the discipline of truthfulness, the rigor of honesty.'"

Further background: Kramer opposes

"willed frivolity and politicized vulgarization as fashionable enemies of high culture as represented in the recent past by the integrity of modernism."

 

— "25 Years of The New Criterion"

Perhaps Kramer would agree that such integrity is exemplified by "Two Giants" of modernism described by Roberta Smith in The New York Times recently (Nov. 3– birthdate of A. B. Coble, an artist of a different kind). She is reviewing an exhibit, ''Albers and Moholy-Nagy: From the Bauhaus to the New World,'' that continues through Jan. 21 at the Whitney Museum of American Art,

945 Madison Avenue: '945' as an 'artist's signature'

 945
Madison Avenue.

This instance of the number 945 as an "artists' signature" is perhaps more impressive than the instances cited in yesterday's Log24 entry, Signature.
 

Monday, September 18, 2006

Monday September 18, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:14 AM
Apology

 

Excerpts from
Log 24, January 18, 2004:

 
A Living Church

"Plato has told you a truth; but Plato is dead. Shakespeare has startled you with an image; but Shakespeare will not startle you with any more. But imagine what it would be to live with such men still living. To know that Plato might break out with an original lecture to-morrow, or that at any moment Shakespeare might shatter everything with a single song. The man who lives in contact with what he believes to be a living Church is a man always expecting to meet Plato and Shakespeare to-morrow at breakfast. He is always expecting to see some truth that he has never seen before."

— G. K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

C. P. Snow on G. H. Hardy in the foreword to A Mathematician's Apology:

"… he had another favourite entertainment…."

… If, as Chesterton might surmise, he… met Plato and Shakespeare in Heaven, the former might discuss with him the eternal Platonic form of the number 17*, while the latter might offer….

* Footnote of 9/18/06: For the Platonic form of 17, see Feast of the Triumph of the Cross (9/14/06) and Medal (9/15/06).

A Living Church,
continued…

Apology:
An Exercise in Rhetoric

Related material:


MOVIE RELEASED
ON 6-6-6 —


"Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick stars in a scene from the R-rated movie 'The Omen.' An official of the Australian bishops conference took on the superstition surrounding the movie's release date of June 6, 2006, noting that 'I take evil far too seriously to think "The Omen" is telling me anything realistic or important.'" (CNS/20th Century Fox)

and

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Friday, September 15, 2006

Friday September 15, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 7:11 AM
Medal

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060915-Roots.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

In memory of
journalist Oriana Fallaci,
who died last night:

"In September [2005], she had a private audience with Pope Benedict XVI at Castel Gandolfo, his summer residence outside Rome. She had criticized John Paul II for making overtures to Muslims, and for not condemning terrorism heartily enough, but she has hopes for Joseph Ratzinger. (The meeting was something of a scandal in Italy, since Fallaci has always said that she is an atheist; more recently, she has called herself a 'Christian atheist,' out of respect for Italy's Catholic tradition.) Last December, the Italian government presented her with a gold medal for 'cultural achievement.'"
 

The New Yorker, issue of June 5, 2006

 

Fallaci's book The Force of Reason
was published in March.

For more on the "medal"
pictured above,
see Log24 entries of
September 13 and 14
and of  D-Day 2006.

Update of 4 PM Sept. 15–

Click for further details:
"She has hopes
for Joseph Ratzinger….
"
 

Thursday, September 14, 2006

Thursday September 14, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 7:11 PM
Today is the Feast of the
Triumph of the Cross

Primitive roots modulo 17
(Based on Weyl's Symmetry)

and the birthday of
an expert on primitive roots,
the late I. M. Vinogradov.

Elements of Number Theory, by Vinogradov

Happy birthday.

Click on pictures
for further details.
 

Thursday, July 20, 2006

Thursday July 20, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 AM

Bead Game

Those who clicked on Rieff's concept in the previous entry will know about the book that Rieff titled Sacred Order/Social Order: My Life among the Deathworks.

That entry, from Tuesday, July 18, was titled "Sacred Order," and gave as an example the following figure:
 

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060604-Roots.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
(Based on Weyl's Symmetry)

For the use of this same figure to represent a theatrical concept–

"It's like stringing beads on a necklace. By the time the play ends, you have the whole necklace."

— see Ursprache Revisited (June 9, 2006).

Of course, the figure also includes a cross– or "deathwork"– of sorts.  These incidental social properties of the figure (which is purely mathematical in origin) make it a suitable memorial for a theatre critic who died on the date of the previous entry– July 18– and for whom the American Theatre Wing's design awards, the Henry Hewes Awards, are named.

"The annual awards honor designers… recognizing not only the traditional design categories of sets, costumes and lighting, but also 'Notable Effects,' which encompasses sound, music, video, puppets and other creative elements." —BroadwayWorld.com

For more on life among the deathworks, see an excellent review of the Rieff book mentioned above.
 

Tuesday, July 18, 2006

Tuesday July 18, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Sacred Order

In memory of Philip Rieff, who died on July 1, 2006:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060604-Roots.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

The image ?http://www.log24.com/theory/images/GF64-63cycleA495.gif? cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

and

The image ?http://www.log24.com/theory/images/MySpace.jpg? cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

For details, see the
five Log24 entries ending
on the morning of
Midsummer Day, 2006.

Thanks to University Diaries for pointing out the essay on Rieff.
 
That essay says Rieff had "a dense, knotty, ironic style designed to warn off impatient readers. You had to unpack his aphorisms carefully. And this took a while. As a result, his thinking had a time-release effect." Good for him.  For a related essay (time-release effect unknown), see Hitler's Still Point: A Hate Speech for Harvard.
 

Monday, June 26, 2006

Monday June 26, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:29 AM

A Little Extra Reading

In memory of
Mary Martin McLaughlin,
a scholar of Heloise and Abelard.
McLaughlin died on June 8, 2006.

"Following the parade, a speech is given by Charles Williams, based on his book The Place of the Lion. Williams explains the true meaning of the word 'realism' in both philosophy and theology. His guard of honor, bayonets gleaming, is led by William of Ockham."

Midsummer Eve's Dream

A review by John D. Burlinson of Charles Williams's novel The Place of the Lion:

"… a little extra reading regarding Abelard's take on 'universals' might add a little extra spice– since Abelard is the subject of the heroine's … doctoral dissertation. I'd suggest the article 'The Medieval Problem of Universals' in the online Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy."

Michael L. Czapkay, a student of philosophical theology at Oxford:

"The development of logic in the schools and universities of western Europe between the eleventh and fifteenth centuries constituted a significant contribution to the history of philosophy. But no less significant was the influence of this development of logic on medieval theology. It provided the necessary conceptual apparatus for the systematization of theology. Abelard, Ockham, and Thomas Aquinas are paradigm cases of the extent to which logic played an active role in the systematic formulation of Christian theology. In fact, at certain points, for instance in modal logic, logical concepts were intimately related to theological problems, such as God's knowledge of future contingent truths."

The Medieval Problem of Universals, by Fordham's Gyula Klima, 2004:

"… for Abelard, a status is an object of the divine mind, whereby God preconceives the state of his creation from eternity."

Status Symbol

(based on Weyl's Symmetry):

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060604-Roots.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"… for then we would know

the mind of God"
Stephen Hawking, 1988

For further details,
click on the picture.

Saturday, June 24, 2006

Saturday June 24, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 7:59 AM
Zen and the Art

"Man stands in his own shadow and wonders why it is dark."

— "Ancient Zen saying," according to "Today in History," June 24, by the Associated Press

"A man may be free to travel where he likes, but there is no place on earth where he can escape from his own Karma, and whether he lives on a mountain or in a city he may still be the victim of an uncontrolled mind. For man's Karma travels with him, like his shadow. Indeed, it is his shadow, for it has been said, 'Man stands in his own shadow and wonders why it is dark.'"

— Alan W. Watts, The Spirit of Zen, third edition, Grove Press, 1958, page 97

Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, 1974:

"But what's happening is that each year our old flat earth of conventional reason becomes less and less adequate to handle the experiences we have and this is creating widespread feelings of topsy-turviness. As a result we're getting more and more people in irrational areas of thought… occultism, mysticism, drug changes and the like… because they feel the inadequacy of classical reason to handle what they know are real experiences."

"I'm not sure what you mean by classical reason."

"Analytic reason, dialectic reason. Reason which at the University is sometimes considered to be the whole of understanding. You've never had to understand it really. It's always been completely bankrupt with regard to abstract art. Nonrepresentative art is one of the root experiences I'm talking about. Some people still condemn it because it doesn’t make 'sense.' But what's really wrong is not the art but the 'sense,' the classical reason, which can't grasp it. People keep looking for branch extensions of reason that will cover art's more recent occurrences, but the answers aren't in the branches, they're at the roots."
 

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060604-Roots.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

D-Day Morning,
Figures of Speech,
Ursprache Revisited.

See also
the previous entry.

Saturday June 24, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM
In memory of
Aaron Spelling

"Let the midnight special
shine her light on me."

For more on the
eight-point star of Venus,
see Bright Star.

Related material:
April 21-22, 2003.

Friday, June 9, 2006

Friday June 9, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 AM

Ursprache Revisited

"Rilke's poems operate at this balancing point between openness and closure, between centripedal and centrifugal motion, the poem being all symbol and being all object.  Rilke developed the inwardness of poetry begun in Baudelaire and refined in Mallarmé into new depths of self-referentiality.  Verinnerlichung was the term for this transmutation from outer to inner…."

Rainer Maria Rilke: Life and Work,
    by Jeremy Robinson
 

For a symbol of
Verinnerlichung,
see a figure from
April 5, 2005:
 

(Skewed Mirrors
,
Sept. 14, 2003)

Related material: Herbert Silberer on Verinnerlichung in Problems of Mysticism and the Log24 entry Figures of Speech of 10 AM Wednesday, June 7– the date of death of theatrical agent Howard Rosenstone.  See also the work of playwrights Donald Margulies and William Finn, clients of Rosenstone.

For Margulies, see a review of "Brooklyn Boy"

"It's like stringing beads on a necklace. By the time the play ends, you have the whole necklace. But it's not like a typical play, where you know where you're going at the end of Act I. In this case, you'll learn something in one scene that will make you realize Eric was lying in a previous scene.  And the play is partly about the lies we tell each other, the lies we tell ourselves and the identity we project to other people." — Actor Robert Gomes

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060604-Roots.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 

For Finn, see
circle-in-the-square.com.
"Finn, again!"
— James Joyce  
 

Wednesday, June 7, 2006

Wednesday June 7, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 AM
Figures of Speech

Omen

(x)

in memory of
Arnold Newman,
dead on 6/6/6.
 

TIME magazine, issue dated June 12, 2006, item posted Sunday, June 4, 2006:

IF AT FIRST YOU DON'T SUCCEED …

By JULIE RAWE

"Nervous kids and obscure words are not the stuff of big-time TV, but this year's Scripps National Spelling Bee was an improbable nail-biter. One of the 13 finalists got reinstated after judges made a spelling error, a Canadian came in second–who knew foreign kids could compete?–and KATHARINE CLOSE, 13, prevailed in her fifth year. The eighth-grader from Spring Lake, N.J., won with ursprache. It means protolanguage. Now try to use it in conversation."

John T. Lysaker (pdf)
quoting Heidegger:
"Poetry is the
 originary language
    (Ursprache)…"

— Heidegger, Erlauterungen
zu Holderlins Dichtung
.
 Frankfurt am Main:
Klostermann, 1971: 41.

See also a figure from
D-Day morning,
6/6/6:

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and a figure from
April 5, 2005:
 


(Skewed Mirrors
,
Sept. 14, 2003)

"Evil did not have
the last word."
Richard John Neuhaus,
April 4, 2005

"This is the exact opposite
of what echthroi do in
their X-ing or un-naming."
Wikipedia on
A Wind in the Door

"Lps. The keys to. Given!
 A way a lone a last
 a loved a long the
 PARIS,
 1922-1939"
 — James Joyce,
     Finnegans Wake


"There is never any ending
to Paris."
— Ernest Hemingway    

Tuesday, June 6, 2006

Tuesday June 6, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 5:01 AM
D-Day Morning,
62 Years Later

Review: ART WARS
on Sept. 12, 2002:

Und was fur ein Bild des Christentums 
ist dabei herausgekommen?

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(Pentecost was Sunday, June 4, 2006.
The following Monday was formerly a
French public holiday.)

This morning's meditation:

Sous Rature

"… words must be written
sous rature, or 'under erasure.'"

Deconstruction:
 Derrida, Theology,
and John of the Cross

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The above Bild, based
 on Weyl's Symmetry,
might be titled
Rature sous Rature.
 

Monday, June 5, 2006

Monday June 5, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:06 AM

Sermon

Baccalaureate:
A farewell address
in the form of a sermon
delivered to a graduating class.

"Stuff comes up,
weird doors open,
people fall into things."
— David Sedaris,
baccalaureate address
at Princeton yesterday

"The truth is that man's capacity for symbol-mongering in general and language in particular is so intimately part and parcel of his being human, of his perceiving and knowing, of his very consciousness itself, that it is all but impossible for him to focus on the magic prism through which he sees everything else."

Walker Percy, The Message in the Bottle: How Queer Man Is, How Queer Language Is, and What One Has to Do with the Other. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1975, page 29.

Review: ART WARS
on Sept. 12, 2002:

Und was für ein Bild des Christentums 
ist dabei herausgekommen?

Voilà:

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Related material:
Bright Star.

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