Log24

Monday, September 4, 2017

Perspective

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:12 AM

Cover design by Jarrod Taylor.
Book published on July 14, 2015.

For this journal on that date, see posts tagged Perspective.

Night at the Museum

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:35 AM

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Dead Poet

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:48 PM

The time is from
a screenshot 
of my RSS feed.

"All in good time."

(See this morning's
  Mosaic Logic.)

Friday, December 16, 2011

Take Your Pick

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:31 PM

Two recent quotes in this journal—

December 14

"Hoban once ruefully observed that death would be a good career move:
'People will say, "Yes, Hoban, he seems an interesting writer, let’s look at him again."'"

December 15

"This poem is concerned with language on a very plain level."

— "Paradoxes and Oxymorons" in Shadow Train

Michael Kinsley in The New York Times  on Sunday, May 13, 2007

Kinsley on the career of Christopher Hitchens—

Interesting! …. Interesting!! …. Interesting!!! …. Interesting!!!!

Where was this train heading?

Kinsley on a book in which Hitchens …

… pronounces the movie “It’s a Wonderful Life” “engaging but abysmal” (a typical Hitchens aside: cleverly paradoxical? witlessly oxymoronic? take your pick)….

Thursday, December 15, 2011

As Is

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:56 AM

What "As" Is —

Image- The Three-Point Line: A Finite Projective Geometry

"This poem is concerned with language on a very plain level."

Shadow Train

"You got to ride it like you find it."
Song lyric

Related entertainment —

IMAGE- Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

What “As” Is

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:00 PM

or:  Combinatorics (Rota) as Philosophy (Heidegger) as Geometry (Me)

"Dasein’s full existential structure is constituted by
the 'as-structure' or 'well-joined structure' of the rift-design*…"

— Gary Williams, post of January 22, 2010

Background—

Gian-Carlo Rota on Heidegger…

"… The universal as  is given various names in Heidegger's writings….

The discovery of the universal as  is Heidegger's contribution to philosophy….

The universal 'as' is the surgence of sense in Man, the shepherd of Being.

The disclosure of the primordial as  is the end of a search that began with Plato….
This search comes to its conclusion with Heidegger."

— "Three Senses of 'A is B' in Heideggger," Ch. 17 in Indiscrete Thoughts

… and points as separating rifts

Image-- The Three-Point Line: A
 Finite Projective Space

    Click image for details.

* rift-design— Definition by Deborah Levitt

"Rift.  The stroke or rending by which a world worlds, opening both the 'old' world and the self-concealing earth to the possibility of a new world. As well as being this stroke, the rift is the site— the furrow or crack— created by the stroke. As the 'rift design' it is the particular characteristics or traits of this furrow."

— "Heidegger and the Theater of Truth," in Tympanum: A Journal of Comparative Literary Studies, Vol. 1, 1998

Monday, January 10, 2005

Monday January 10, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Realism

In memory of Humphrey Carpenter:

"Aslan's last words come at the end of The Last Battle: 'There was a real railway accident […] Your father and mother and all of you are–as you used to call it in the Shadow-Lands–dead. The term is over: the holidays have begun. The dream is ended: this is the morning.' The final paragraph of the novel, which follows these words, functions as a coda; it is full of the conventions which signal the wrapping up of a story. This direct speech is the true climax of the Chronicles. Aslan is given the last word in these quiet but emphatic lines. He is the ultimate arbiter of reality: 'There was a real railway accident.' Plato, in addition to the Christian tradition, lies behind the closing chapters of The Last Battle….

'It's all in Plato, all in Plato: bless me, what do they teach them at these schools!' "

Joy Alexander, Aslan's Speech

See also From Tate to Plato (Nov. 19, 2004), Habeas Corpus (Nov. 24, 2004), and the Log24 entries of last Friday through Sunday.




 
"There was a real railway accident."

Sunday, July 13, 2003

Sunday July 13, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 5:09 PM

ART WARS, 5:09

The Word in the Desert

For Harrison Ford in the desert.
(See previous entry.)

    Words strain,
Crack and sometimes break,
    under the burden,
Under the tension, slip, slide, perish,
Will not stay still. Shrieking voices
Scolding, mocking, or merely chattering,
Always assail them.
    The Word in the desert
Is most attacked by voices of temptation,
The crying shadow in the funeral dance,
The loud lament of
    the disconsolate chimera.

— T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets

The link to the word "devilish" in the last entry leads to one of my previous journal entries, "A Mass for Lucero," that deals with the devilishness of postmodern philosophy.  To hammer this point home, here is an attack on college English departments that begins as follows:

"William Faulkner's Snopes trilogy, which recounts the generation-long rise of the drily loathsome Flem Snopes from clerk in a country store to bank president in Jefferson, Mississippi, teems with analogies to what has happened to English departments over the past thirty years."

For more, see

The Word in the Desert,
by Glenn C. Arbery
.

See also the link on the word "contemptible," applied to Jacques Derrida, in my Logos and Logic page.

This leads to an National Review essay on Derrida,

The Philosopher as King,
by Mark Goldblatt

A reader's comment on my previous entry suggests the film "Scotland, PA" as viewing related to the Derrida/Macbeth link there.

I prefer the following notice of a 7-11 death, that of a powerful art museum curator who would have been well cast as Lady Macbeth:

Die Fahne Hoch,
Frank Stella,
1959


Dorothy Miller,
MOMA curator,

died at 99 on
July 11, 2003
.

From the Whitney Museum site:

"Max Anderson: When artist Frank Stella first showed this painting at The Museum of Modern Art in 1959, people were baffled by its austerity. Stella responded, 'What you see is what you see. Painting to me is a brush in a bucket and you put it on a surface. There is no other reality for me than that.' He wanted to create work that was methodical, intellectual, and passionless. To some, it seemed to be nothing more than a repudiation of everything that had come before—a rational system devoid of pleasure and personality. But other viewers saw that the black paintings generated an aura of mystery and solemnity.

The title of this work, Die Fahne Hoch, literally means 'The banner raised.'  It comes from the marching anthem of the Nazi youth organization. Stella pointed out that the proportions of this canvas are much the same as the large flags displayed by the Nazis.

But the content of the work makes no reference to anything outside of the painting itself. The pattern was deduced from the shape of the canvas—the width of the black bands is determined by the width of the stretcher bars. The white lines that separate the broad bands of black are created by the narrow areas of unpainted canvas. Stella's black paintings greatly influenced the development of Minimalism in the 1960s."

From Play It As It Lays:

   She took his hand and held it.  "Why are you here."
   "Because you and I, we know something.  Because we've been out there where nothing is.  Because I wanted—you know why."
   "Lie down here," she said after a while.  "Just go to sleep."
   When he lay down beside her the Seconal capsules rolled on the sheet.  In the bar across the road somebody punched King of the Road on the jukebox again, and there was an argument outside, and the sound of a bottle breaking.  Maria held onto BZ's hand.
   "Listen to that," he said.  "Try to think about having enough left to break a bottle over it."
   "It would be very pretty," Maria said.  "Go to sleep."

I smoke old stogies I have found…    

Cigar Aficionado on artist Frank Stella:

" 'Frank actually makes the moment. He captures it and helps to define it.'

This was certainly true of Stella's 1958 New York debut. Fresh out of Princeton, he came to New York and rented a former jeweler's shop on Eldridge Street on the Lower East Side. He began using ordinary house paint to paint symmetrical black stripes on canvas. Called the Black Paintings, they are credited with paving the way for the minimal art movement of the 1960s. By the fall of 1959, Dorothy Miller of The Museum of Modern Art had chosen four of the austere pictures for inclusion in a show called Sixteen Americans."

For an even more austere picture, see

Geometry for Jews:

For more on art, Derrida, and devilishness, see Deborah Solomon's essay in the New York Times Magazine of Sunday, June 27, 1999:

 How to Succeed in Art.

"Blame Derrida and
his fellow French theorists…."

See, too, my site

Art Wars: Geometry as Conceptual Art

For those who prefer a more traditional meditation, I recommend

Ecce Lignum Crucis

("Behold the Wood of the Cross")

THE WORD IN THE DESERT

For more on the word "road" in the desert, see my "Dead Poet" entry of Epiphany 2003 (Tao means road) as well as the following scholarly bibliography of road-related cultural artifacts (a surprising number of which involve Harrison Ford):

A Bibliography of Road Materials

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