Log24

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Invisible Weaving

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:13 AM

See as well a post from this journal on the above date
June 12, 2014. (That post revisits a post from today's  date —
January 7 — eight years ago, in 2012.)

Related material:  Dharma Fabric and Symplectic.

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Interlacing, Interweaving

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 PM

The above title should be sung to the following tune

"Right through hell
 there is a path…."
 — Malcolm Lowry,
Under the Volcano

Saturday, October 31, 2015

Weaving World…

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:00 PM

Continues.

Addendum —


      See also Symplectic Structure 
      and Stevens's Rock.

Saturday, October 17, 2015

Contrapuntal Interweaving

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:28 AM

(Continued from day before yesterday.)

"Sondheim's story is a dense contrapuntal interweaving
of four main fairy-tale stories…."

— Vladimir V. Zelevinsky, 1998 review
     in The Tech  at MIT

Related material: "Weaver's Tale" last Sunday,
and the novel Weaveworld  in this journal.

Thursday, October 15, 2015

Contrapuntal Interweaving

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:01 AM

The title is a phrase from R. D. Laing's book The Politics of Experience .
(Published in the psychedelic year 1967. The later "contrapuntal interweaving"
below is of a less psychedelic nature.)

An illustration of the "interweaving' part of the title —
The "deep structure" of the diamond theorem:

IMAGE- A symplectic structure -- i.e. a structure that is symplectic (meaning plaited or woven).

The word "symplectic" from the end of last Sunday's (Oct. 11) sermon
describes the "interwoven" nature of the above illustration.

An illustration of the "contrapuntal" part of the title (click to enlarge):

The diamond-theorem correlation

 

Monday, July 13, 2015

Weaving World

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:45 PM

(The title was suggested by the novel Weaveworld .)

Recent public selfie by Oslo artist Josefine Lyche —

Lyche's shirt honors the late Kurt Cobain.

Not-so-recent image of Hugo Weaving as
Agent Smith in "The Matrix" —

"Smells like teen spirit."

See also Weaving in the new film "Strangerland."

Friday, March 26, 2021

Sex Textiles: Introduction to Symplectic* Finite Geometry

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:13 PM

'The Eddington Song'

Another concept from The New York Times  today: intertwining

“The historical achievements and experiences of women and men
are like the intertwined warp and weft threads of a woven fabric.”

— Virginia Postrel in a NY Times  opinion piece today.

From Postrel’s Web page

* See (for instance) A Picture Show for Quanta Magazine.

Sunday, February 17, 2019

See Also …

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:31 PM

"And the Führer digs for trinkets in the desert."

"See also Acht "
— Cambridge German-English Dictionary, article on "Elf "

Thursday, November 22, 2018

Geometric Incarnation

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 6:00 AM

"The hint half guessed, the gift half understood, is Incarnation."

— T. S. Eliot in Four Quartets

Note also the four 4×4 arrays surrounding the central diamond
in the chi  of the chi-rho  page of the Book of Kells

From a Log24 post
of March 17, 2012

"Interlocking, interlacing, interweaving"

— Condensed version of page 141 in Eddington's
1939 Philosophy of Physical Science

Friday, January 19, 2018

Details

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:04 AM

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Geometry

Google search result for Plato + Statesman + interlacing + interweaving

See also Symplectic in this journal.

From Gotay and Isenberg, “The Symplectization of Science,”
Gazette des Mathématiciens  54, 59-79 (1992):

“… what is the origin of the unusual name ‘symplectic’? ….
Its mathematical usage is due to Hermann Weyl who,
in an effort to avoid a certain semantic confusion, renamed
the then obscure ‘line complex group’ the ‘symplectic group.’
… the adjective ‘symplectic’ means ‘plaited together’ or ‘woven.’
This is wonderfully apt….”

IMAGE- A symplectic structure -- i.e. a structure that is symplectic (meaning plaited or woven)

The above symplectic  figure appears in remarks on
the diamond-theorem correlation in the webpage
Rosenhain and Göpel Tetrads in PG(3,2). See also
related remarks on the notion of  linear  (or line ) complex
in the finite projective space PG(3,2) —

Anticommuting Dirac matrices as spreads of projective lines

Ron Shaw on the 15 lines of the classical generalized quadrangle W(2), a general linear complex in PG(3,2)

Thursday, November 30, 2017

The Matrix for Quantum Mystics

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:29 PM

Scholia on the title — See Quantum + Mystic in this journal.

The Matrix of Lévi-Strauss

"In Vol. I of Structural Anthropology , p. 209, I have shown that
this analysis alone can account for the double aspect of time
representation in all mythical systems: the narrative is both
'in time' (it consists of a succession of events) and 'beyond'
(its value is permanent)." — Claude Lévi-Strauss, 1976

I prefer the earlier, better-known, remarks on time by T. S. Eliot
in Four Quartets , and the following four quartets (from
The Matrix Meets the Grid) —

.

From a Log24 post of June 26-27, 2017:

A work of Eddington cited in 1974 by von Franz

See also Dirac and Geometry and Kummer in this journal.

Ron Shaw on Eddington's triads "associated in conjugate pairs" —

For more about hyperbolic  and isotropic  lines in PG(3,2),
see posts tagged Diamond Theorem Correlation.

For Shaw, in memoriam — See Contrapuntal Interweaving and The Fugue.

Monday, June 26, 2017

Upgrading to Six

This post was suggested by the previous post — Four Dots —
and by the phrase "smallest perfect" in this journal.

Related material (click to enlarge) —

Detail —

From the work of Eddington cited in 1974 by von Franz —

See also Dirac and Geometry and Kummer in this journal.

Updates from the morning of June 27 —

Ron Shaw on Eddington's triads "associated in conjugate pairs" —

For more about hyperbolic  and isotropic  lines in PG(3,2),
see posts tagged Diamond Theorem Correlation.

For Shaw, in memoriam — See Contrapuntal Interweaving and The Fugue.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Norwegian Sermon

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:30 AM

"And the Führer digs for trinkets in the desert."

See also the previous post.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Warp and Woof

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 3:00 PM

Space —

Space structure —

From Gotay and Isenberg, “The Symplectization of Science,”
Gazette des Mathématiciens  54, 59-79 (1992):

“… what is the origin of the unusual name ‘symplectic’? ….
Its mathematical usage is due to Hermann Weyl who,
in an effort to avoid a certain semantic confusion, renamed
the then obscure ‘line complex group’ the ‘symplectic group.’
… the adjective ‘symplectic’ means ‘plaited together’ or ‘woven.’
This is wonderfully apt….”

IMAGE- A symplectic structure -- i.e. a structure that is symplectic (meaning plaited or woven)

The above symplectic  figure appears in remarks on
the diamond-theorem correlation in the webpage
Rosenhain and Göpel Tetrads in PG(3,2).

Space shuttle —

Related ethnic remarks —

As opposed to Michael  Larsen —

Funny, you don't look  Danish.

Saturday, October 22, 2016

Magis

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 AM

From "The Magis way: Notes on the publishing culture,"
by Giampiero Bosoni, at http://www.magisdesign.com/magis-world/ —

" perhaps it is interesting to reflect further on the relationship between a design object and a literary work, by reading (in whatever interpretative key you choose) the illuminating definition given by the great semiologist Roland Barthes of the act of writing and of the literary value of a text. 'Writing,' Barthes tells us, 'is historically an action that involves constant contradiction, based on dual expectations. One aspect of writing is essentially commercial, a means of control and segregation, steeped in the most materialistic aspect of society. The other is an act of pleasure, connected to the deepest urges of the body and to the subtlest and most successful products of art. This is how the written text is woven. All I have done is to arrange and reveal the threads. Now each can add his own warp to the weft.' [3]

Magis’ long and highly advanced experience has given evidence, further confirmed by this latest publishing catalogue, of an ever-growing awareness of this necessary interweaving between warp and weft, between the culture of craftsmanship and that of industry, between design culture and business culture, between form and technique, between symbolic codes and practical functions, between poetry and everyday life." 

— Giampiero Bosoni

[3] Barthes R., Variations sur l’écriture  (1972), Editions du Seuil, Paris 1994, published in the second volume of the Oeuvres complètes  1966-1975 (freely translated from the Italian translation, Variazioni sulla scrittura seguite da Il piacere del testo , Ossola C. (editor) Einaudi, Turin 1999).

See as well "Interweaving" in this journal.

"Design is how it works." — Steve Jobs

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Grammar and Patterns

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 10:00 PM

"May, / The months [sic ] of understanding" — Wallace Stevens

Saturday, May 21, 2016

Grammar

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM 

Related material 

The Lindbergh Manifesto and The Leibniz Medal.

 

"If pure mathematics does spring from sub-conscious intuitions— already deep-structured as are grammatical patterns in the transformational-generative theory of language?— if the algebraic operation arises from wholly internalized pattern-weaving, how then can it, at so many points, mesh with, correspond to, the material forms of the world?"

— Steiner, George. Grammars of Creation
(Gifford Lectures, 1990). (Kindle Locations 2494-2496).
Open Road Media. Kindle Edition. 

Good question.

See Bedtime Story (Sept. 1, 2016).

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Image Search

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Click to enlarge.

See also the word  "contrapuntal" in this journal. 

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

The Mystery of O

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

"The domain of O has been explored by philosophers and mystics
under titles like the Absolute, Ultimate Reality or Ultimate Truth,
the Ground of Being, God or the godhead. O is the world of Plato’s
ideal forms, Kant’s things-in-themselves, Bion’s pre-conceptions,
Klein’s inborn phantasies and Jung’s archetypes."

— Barbara Stevens Sullivan on page 38 of her book
The Mystery of Analytical Work: Weavings from Jung and Bion ,
Routledge first edition, 2010

See also Bion in The Search for Charles Wallace, and

'Study of O' by Steven H. Cullinane, Oct. 16, 1983

Click on the image for some context.

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Raiders of the Lost Box

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:30 AM

See Triumph of the Will and Box of Nothing

"And the Führer digs for trinkets in the desert."

Friday, January 8, 2016

Triumph of the Will

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

"And the Führer digs for trinkets in the desert."

Monday, October 12, 2015

Ex Tenebris

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:40 AM
 
“By groping toward the light
 we are made to realize
 how deep the darkness
 is around us.”
 
— Arthur Koestler,
   The Call Girls: A Tragi-Comedy,
   Random House, 1973,
   page 118

"The Tesseract is where it belongs: out of our reach."

 — Samuel L. Jackson as Nick Fury,
      quoted here on Epiphany 2013

Earlier (See Jan. 27, 2012)

"And the Führer digs for trinkets in the desert."

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Schoolgirl Problem

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:00 PM

Or: Ten Years and a Day

In memory of film director Robert Wise,
who died ten years ago yesterday.

A search in this journal for "Schoolgirl" ends with a post
from Sept. 10, 2002, The Sound of Hanging Rock.

See as well a Log24 search for "Strangerland"
(a 2015 film about a search for a schoolgirl) and
a Log24 search for "Weaving."

Related mathematics:  Symplectic.

Some related images (click to enlarge) —

Monday, August 3, 2015

Text and Context*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 AM

"The ORCID organization offers an open and
independent registry intended to be the de facto  
standard for contributor identification in research
and academic publishing. On 16 October 2012,
ORCID launched its registry services and
started issuing user identifiers." — Wikipedia

This journal on the above date —

  

A more recent identifier —

Related material —

See also the recent posts Ein Kampf and Symplectic.

* Continued.

Sunday, August 2, 2015

Symplectic

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 AM

See "Symplectic" in this journal.  Some illustrations —

 

Midrash —

"Adorned with cryptic stones and sliding shines,
An immaculate personage in nothingness,
With the whole spirit sparkling in its cloth,

Generations of the imagination piled
In the manner of its stitchings, of its thread,
In the weaving round the wonder of its need,

And the first flowers upon it, an alphabet
By which to spell out holy doom and end,
A bee for the remembering of happiness."

— Wallace Stevens, "The Owl in the Sarcophagus"

Monday, December 15, 2014

Mythic Metaphysics

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:01 PM

Today’s 8:01 PM post quoted Husserl on
the perception of the cube.

Another approach to perception of the cube,
from Narrative  Metaphysics on St. Lucia’s Day —


      See also Symplectic Structure and Stevens’s Rock.

From today’s 11:29 AM post —

John Burt Foster Jr. in Nabokov’s Art of Memory and
European Modernism
  (Princeton U. Press, 1993, p. 224) —

At the time of The Waste Land , in a comment on
Joyce’s Ulysses  that influenced many later definitions
of modernism in the English-speaking world, Eliot
announced, “instead of narrative method, we may
now use the mythical method.”13

For some illuminating remarks on a mythical  approach
to perception of the cube, see Gareth Knight on Schicksalstag   2012.

Saturday, December 13, 2014

Narrative Metaphysics

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

From “Guardians of the Galaxy” —

“Then the Universe exploded into existence…”

For those who prefer a more traditional approach :

See also Symplectic Structure and Stevens’s Rock.

Monday, February 27, 2012

Annals of Religion

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 AM

"Allegorical pictures of contemporary events
 have a way of weaving in and out
 between the symbolic and the semi-psychotic."

 — Adam Gopnik in The New Yorker , issue dated March 5, 2012

See also Venue and Weaveworld .

Sunday, September 11, 2011

First Lady

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:59 AM

Betty Skelton, "the First Lady of Firsts," died on the last day of August.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110911-NYTobitsSm.jpg

From this  journal on August thirty-first—

"The Tesseract was the jewel of Odin's treasure room."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110831-JohannSchmidt.jpg

Hugo Weaving also played Agent Smith
in The Matrix Trilogy .

For Cynthia Zarin, biographer of Madeleine L'Engle

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract."
A Wrinkle in Time

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Boundary (continued*)

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

It is now midnight. Yesterday was Odin's Day. Today is Thor's Day.

From a weblog post on Captain America and Thor

"While all this [Captain America] is happening an SS officer, Johann Schmidt (Hugo Weaving), has found a religious artefact called the Tesseract which Schmidt describes as 'the jewel of Odin’s treasure room,' linking it in with the Thor storyline."

That's Entertainment  weblog, August 14, 2011

From Wallace Stevens, "An Ordinary Evening in New Haven," Canto III—

The point of vision and desire are the same.
It is to the hero of midnight that we pray
On a hill of stones to make beau mont thereof.

Captain America opened in the United States on Friday, July 22, 2011.

Thor opened in the United States on Friday, May 6, 2011.

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract." —A Wrinkle in Time

* Continued from August 30.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Odin’s Day

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Today is Wednesday.

O.E. Wodnesdæg  "Woden's day," a Gmc. loan-translation of L. dies Mercurii  "day of Mercury" (cf. O.N. Oðinsdagr , Swed. Onsdag , O.Fris. Wonsdei , M.Du. Wudensdach ). For Woden , see Odin  . — Online Etymology Dictionary

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110831-HopkinsAsOdin.jpg

Above: Anthony Hopkins as Odin in the 2011 film "Thor"

Hugo Weaving as Johann Schmidt in the related 2011 film "Captain America"—

"The Tesseract* was the jewel of Odin's treasure room."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110831-JohannSchmidt.jpg

Weaving also played Agent Smith in The Matrix Trilogy.

The figure at the top in the circle of 13** "Thor" characters above is Agent Coulson.

"I think I'm lucky that they found out they need somebody who's connected to the real world to help bring these characters all together."

— Clark Gregg, who plays Agent Coulson in "Thor," at UGO.com

For another circle of 13, see the Crystal Skull film implicitly referenced in the Bright Star link from Abel Prize (Friday, Aug. 26, 2011)—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110831-BrightStar.jpg

Today's New York Times  has a quote about a former mathematician who died on that day (Friday, Aug. 26, 2011)—

"He treated it like a puzzle."

Sometimes that's the best you can do.

* See also tesseract  in this journal.

** For a different arrangement of 13 things, see the cube's 13 axes in this journal.

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Toy Story Variations

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:30 PM

Where Entertainment Is God  continues...

New York Lottery today— Midday 710, Evening 563.

This suggeests a scientific note from the date 7/10  (2009) and the page number 563 from Dec. 29

Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society , October 2002, p. 563:

“To produce decorations for their weaving, pottery, and other objects, early artists experimented with symmetries and repeating patterns.  Later the study of symmetries of patterns led to tilings, group theory, crystallography, finite geometries, and in modern times to security codes and digital picture compactifications.  Early artists also explored various methods of representing existing objects and living things.  These explorations led to… [among other things] computer-generated movies (for example, Toy Story ).”

– David W. Henderson, Cornell University

For a different perspective on Toy Story , see the Dec. 29 post.

Other entertainments — The novel Infinite Jest  and two versions of "Heeere's Johnny !" —

            From Stanley Kubrick and from today's New York Times :

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110111-ShiningJest.jpg

See also All Things Shining  and the lottery theology of Jorge Luis Borges.

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Toy Stories

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:31 AM

From the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society , October 2002, p. 563:

“To produce decorations for their weaving, pottery, and other objects, early artists experimented with symmetries and repeating patterns.  Later the study of symmetries of patterns led to tilings, group theory, crystallography, finite geometries, and in modern times to security codes and digital picture compactifications.  Early artists also explored various methods of representing existing objects and living things.  These explorations led to… [among other things] computer-generated movies (for example, Toy Story ).”

– David W. Henderson, Cornell University

THE SOURCE —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101229-Geometry-ToyStory.jpg

From the weblog The Ghost Light on Christmas Day, 2010 —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101229-WoodyOrBuzz.jpg

For Rachel and her children.

Friday, April 17, 2009

Friday April 17, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:31 AM

Begettings of
the Broken Bold

Thanks for the following
quotation (“Non deve…
nella testa“) go to the
weblog writer who signs
himself “Conrad H. Roth.”

Autobiography
of Goethe

(Vol. II, London, Bell & Daldy,
1868, at Google Books):

… Yesterday I took leave of my Captain, with a promise of visiting him at Bologna on my return. He is a true

A PAPAL SOLDIER’S IDEAS OF PROTESTANTS 339

representative of the majority of his countrymen. Here, however, I would record a peculiarity which personally distinguished him. As I often sat quiet and lost in thought he once exclaimed “Che pensa? non deve mai pensar l’uomo, pensando s’invecchia;” which being interpreted is as much as to say, “What are you thinking about: a man ought never to think; thinking makes one old.” And now for another apophthegm of his; “Non deve fermarsi l’uomo in una sola cosa, perche allora divien matto; bisogna aver mille cose, una confusione nella testa;” in plain English, “A man ought not to rivet his thoughts exclusively on any one thing, otherwise he is sure to go mad; he ought to have in his head a thousand things, a regular medley.”

Certainly the good man could not know that the very thing that made me so thoughtful was my having my head mazed by a regular confusion of things, old and new. The following anecdote will serve to elucidate still more clearly the mental character of an Italian of this class. Having soon discovered that I was a Protestant, he observed after some circumlocution, that he hoped I would allow him to ask me a few questions, for he had heard such strange things about us Protestants that he wished to know for a certainty what to think of us.

Notes for Roth:

Roth and Corleone in Havana

The title of this entry,
“Begettings of the Broken Bold,”
is from Wallace Stevens’s
“The Owl in the Sarcophagus”–

This was peace after death, the brother of sleep,
The inhuman brother so much like, so near,
Yet vested in a foreign absolute,

Adorned with cryptic stones and sliding shines,
An immaculate personage in nothingness,
With the whole spirit sparkling in its cloth,

Generations of the imagination piled
In the manner of its stitchings, of its thread,
In the weaving round the wonder of its need,

And the first flowers upon it, an alphabet
By which to spell out holy doom and end,
A bee for the remembering of happiness.

Peace stood with our last blood adorned, last mind,
Damasked in the originals of green,
A thousand begettings of the broken bold.

This is that figure stationed at our end,
Always, in brilliance, fatal, final, formed
Out of our lives to keep us in our death....

Related material:

  • Yesterday’s entry on Giordano Bruno and the Geometry of Language
  • James Joyce and Heraldry
  • “One might say that he [Joyce] invented a non-Euclidean geometry of language; and that he worked over it with doggedness and devotion….” —Unsigned notice in The New Republic, 20 January 1941
  • Joyce’s “collideorscape” (scroll down for a citation)
  • “A Hanukkah Tale” (Log24, Dec. 22, 2008)
  • Stevens’s phrase from “An Ordinary Evening in New Haven” (Canto XXV)

Some further context:

Roth’s entry of Nov. 3, 2006–
Why blog, sinners?“–
and Log24 on that date:
First to Illuminate.”

Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Tuesday December 16, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:00 PM
The Square Wheel
(continued)

From The n-Category Cafe today:

David Corfield at 2:33 PM UTC quoting a chapter from a projected second volume of a biography:

"Grothendieck’s spontaneous reaction to whatever appeared to be causing a difficulty… was to adopt and embrace the very phenomenon that was problematic, weaving it in as an integral feature of the structure he was studying, and thus transforming it from a difficulty into a clarifying feature of the situation."

John Baez at 7:14 PM UTC on research:

"I just don’t want to reinvent a wheel, or waste my time inventing a square one."

For the adoption and embracing of such a problematic phenomenon, see The Square Wheel (this journal, Sept. 14, 2004).

For a connection of the square wheel with yesterday's entry for Julie Taymor's birthday, see a note from 2002:

Wolfram's Theory of Everything
and the Gameplayers of Zan
.

Related pictures–

From Wolfram:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix08A/081216-WolframWalsh.gif

A Square

From me:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix08A/081216-IChingWheel.gif

A Wheel

Tuesday, November 15, 2005

Tuesday November 15, 2005

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Windmills
 
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051115-StarRocks1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Upper part of above picture–

From today’s New York Times,
Seeing Mountains in
Starry Clouds of Creation.

Lower part of above picture–
Pilgrimage to Spider Rock:

“This magical place, according to Navajo Legend, was the home of Spider Woman, who gave the gift of weaving to the Dineh’ People.  Today’s Navajos trace the excellence of their finest textiles to this time of legends, when their patron, Changing Woman, met Spider Woman, the first Weaver.”

Vine Deloria Jr.,
 
Evolution, Creationism,
and Other Modern Myths:

“The continuing struggle between evolutionists and creationists, a hot political topic for the past four decades, took a new turn in the summer of 1999 when the Kansas Board of Education voted to omit the mention of evolution in its newly approved curriculum, setting off outraged cries of foul by the scientific establishment.  Don Quixotes on both sides mounted their chargers and went searching for windmills.”

Related material–

A figure from
last night’s entry,
Spider Woman:

Fritz Leiber's 'Spider' symbol

From Sunday, the day
of Vine Deloria’s death,
a picture that might be
called Changing Woman:

  

Kaleidoscope turning…
Shifting pattern
within unalterable structure…
— Roger Zelazny, Eye of Cat     

See also the windmill figure

The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/Whirl3.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

in Time and Eternity
(Log 24, Feb. 1, 2003)

and

a review
of Fritz Leiber’s
The Big Time,

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051115-BigTimePic.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

a story that works.”

Tuesday, August 17, 2004

Tuesday August 17, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:29 PM

Tribute

Un train peut encacher un autre.

Modern Times:

ART WARS September 27, 2002 —

From the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, October 2002, p. 563:

“To produce decorations for their weaving, pottery, and other objects, early artists experimented with symmetries and repeating patterns.  Later the study of symmetries of patterns led to tilings, group theory, crystallography, finite geometries, and in modern times to security codes and digital picture compactifications.  Early artists also explored various methods of representing existing objects and living things.  These explorations led to…. [among other things] computer-generated movies (for example, Toy Story).”

— David W. Henderson, Cornell University

From an earlier Log24.net note: 

John Frankenheimer’s “The Train” —

Und was für ein Bild des Christentums
ist dabei herausgekommen?

Friday, January 10, 2003

Friday January 10, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 8:15 PM

Story

“How much story do you want?” 
— George Balanchine

While researching yesterday’s entry on Balanchine, Apollo, and the nine Muses, I came across this architect’s remarks, partially quoted yesterday and continued here:

“The icon that I use for this element is the nine-fold square…. This is the garden of Apollo, the field of Reason….  This is the Temple of Solomon, as inscribed, for example, by a nine-fold compartmentation to provide the ground plan of Yale, as described to me by Professor Hersey.”

Duncanology Part 3

Checking this out yesterday, I came across the following at a Yale University Art Gallery site:

“This exhibition of nine boldly colored, asymmetrically designed quilts selected from a private collection will be displayed in the Matrix Gallery….

With the guidance of Professor Maude Southwell Wahlman, author of ‘Signs and Symbols: African Images in African American Quilts,’ the collector has explored and gathered examples….”

Exploring and gathering examples myself today, I received a book in the mail — W. M. Spackman’s On the Decay of Humanism (Rutgers University Press, 1967) — and picked up a second-hand book at a sale — Barbara Michaels’s Stitches in Time (Harper Collins Publishers, 1995).

The Spackman book includes the following poem at the end:

In sandarac etui for sepulchre
  lies the cered body of a poisoned queen;
     and in her mouth and hair, and at her feet,
     and in the grey folds of her winding-sheet,
  there sifts a dreamy powder, smooth and green,
the magic of an idle sorcerer,
  an ancient spell, cast when the shroud was spun.
     In death her hands clasp amourously a bowl
     that still contains the fragments of her soul,
  a tale of Beauty sought, and Beauty won,
his false lips kissed, and Beauty dead for her.

— Alexander B. Griswold, Princeton ’28, in the
    Nassau Literary Magazine of December 1925

From a synopsis of Michaels‘s Stitches in Time:

“Michaels follows Rachel, a graduate student studying women’s crafts–weaving, spinning, quilting, embroidery–and the superstitions connected with them. Linking all important rites of passage to the garments created as markers of these occasions leads Rachel to her theory: in societies in which magic was practiced, the garment was meant to protect its wearer. She gains evidence that her theory is valid when an evil antique bridal quilt enters her life.”

Although Stitches in Time is about a quilt — stitched, not spun — Griswold’s line

“an ancient spell, cast when the shroud was spun” 

is very closely related to the evil spell in Michaels’s book. 

The above events display a certain synchronicity that Wallace Stevens might appreciate, especially in light of the following remark in a review of Stitches in Time:

“…the premise is too outlandish for even the suspension of disbelief….” (Publishers Weekly, 4/24/95)

Stevens might reply,

The very man despising honest quilts
Lies quilted to his poll in his despite.

— “The Comedian as the Letter C,” Part V

Finally, those who prefer stories to the more formal qualities of pure dance (ballet) pure mathematics (see previous entry), pure (instrumental) music, and pure (abstract, as in quilt designs) art, can consult the oeuvre of Jodie Foster — as in my 

Pearl Harbor Day entry on Buddhism.

An art historian named Griswold — perhaps that very same Griswold quoted above — might have a thing or two to say to Jodie on her recent film “Anna and the King.”  In the April, 1957, issue of The Journal of the Siam Society, Alexander B. Griswold takes issue with Broadway’s and Hollywood’s “grotesque caricature” of Siamese society, and ultimately with Anna herself:

“The real fault lies in the two books they ultimately spring from — The English Governess at the Court of Siam and The Romance of the Harem — both written by Mrs. Anna Leonowens.”

Is a puzzlement.

See also The Diamond 16 Puzzle for some quilt designs.

Friday, September 27, 2002

Friday September 27, 2002

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:10 PM

Modern Times

ART WARS September 27, 2002:

From the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, October 2002, p. 563:

"To produce decorations for their weaving, pottery, and other objects, early artists experimented with symmetries and repeating patterns.  Later the study of symmetries of patterns led to tilings, group theory, crystallography, finite geometries, and in modern times to security codes and digital picture compactifications.  Early artists also explored various methods of representing existing objects and living things.  These explorations led to…. [among other things] computer-generated movies (for example, Toy Story)."

— David W. Henderson, Cornell University

From an earlier log24.net note: 

 

ART WARS   September 12, 2002

Artist 
Ben
Shahn
was
born
on
this
date
in
1898.

John Frankenheimer's film "The Train" —

Und was für ein Bild des Christentums 
ist dabei herausgekommen?

From Today in Science History:

Locomotion No. 1

[On September 27] 1825, the first locomotive to haul a passenger train was operated by George Stephenson's Stockton & Darlington's line in England. The engine "Locomotion No. 1" pulled 34 wagons and 1 solitary coach…. This epic journey was the launchpad for the development of the railways….

From Inventors World Magazine:

Some inventions enjoyed no single moment of birth. For the steam engine or the motion-picture, the birth-process was, on close examination, a gradual series of steps. To quote Robert Stevenson: 'The Locomotive is not the invention of one man, but a nation of mechanical engineers.' George Stevenson (no relation) probably built the first decent, workable steam engines…  Likewise the motion camera developed into cinema through a line of inventors including Prince, Edison and the Lumière brothers, with others fighting for patents. No consensus exists that one of these was its inventor. The first public display was achieved by the Lumière brothers in Paris.

From my log24.net note of Friday, Sept. 13th:

"Dante compares their dance and song to God’s bride on earth, the Church, when she answers the morning bells to rise from bed and 'woo with matins song her Bridegroom's love.' Some critics consider this passage the most 'spiritually erotic' of all the one hundred cantos of the Comedy."

From my log24.net note of September 12:

 

Everybody's doin'
a brand new dance now…

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