Log24

Friday, March 31, 2017

Into a Dreamland

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:01 PM

See also Weaveworld  in this journal.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

The Crimson Abyss

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:19 PM

"And as the characters in the meme twitch into the abyss
that is the sky, this meme will disappear into whatever
internet abyss swallowed MySpace."

—Staff writer Kamila Czachorowski, Harvard Crimson , March 29

1984

IMAGE- 'Affine Groups on Small Binary Spaces,' illustration

2010

Logo design for Stack Exchange Math by Jin Yang
 

Recent posts now tagged Crimson Abyss suggest
the above logo be viewed in light of a certain page 29

"… as if into a crimson abyss …." —

Update of 9 PM ET March 29, 2017:

Prospero's Children  was first published by HarperCollins,
London, in 1999. A statement by the publisher provides
an instance of the famous "much-needed gap." —

"This is English fantasy at its finest. Prospero’s Children 
steps into the gap that exists between The Lion, the Witch
and the Wardrobe
  and Clive Barker’s Weaveworld , and
is destined to become a modern classic."

Related imagery —

See also "Hexagram 64 in Context" (Log24, March 16, 2017).

Saturday, March 5, 2016

The Looming

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:14 PM

Material related to the title:

  • From the post Edifice (March 1, 2016) —

"Euclid's edifice loomed in my consciousness
as a marvel among sciences, unique in its clarity
and unquestionable validity."
—Richard J. Trudeau in 
   The Non-Euclidean Revolution  (1986)

Saturday, October 17, 2015

Contrapuntal Interweaving

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:28 AM

(Continued from day before yesterday.)

"Sondheim's story is a dense contrapuntal interweaving
of four main fairy-tale stories…."

— Vladimir V. Zelevinsky, 1998 review
     in The Tech  at MIT

Related material: "Weaver's Tale" last Sunday,
and the novel Weaveworld  in this journal.

Monday, September 14, 2015

Happy Birthday to…

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:15 AM

The actor who portrayed the angel Uriel in the TV series
"Supernatural," Robert Wisdom.

See also the angel Uriel in the novel Weaveworld .

Monday, July 13, 2015

Weaving World

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 5:45 PM

(The title was suggested by the novel Weaveworld .)

Recent public selfie by Oslo artist Josefine Lyche —

Lyche's shirt honors the late Kurt Cobain.

Not-so-recent image of Hugo Weaving as
Agent Smith in "The Matrix" —

"Smells like teen spirit."

See also Weaving in the new film "Strangerland."

Saturday, July 11, 2015

Midnight in the Garden of Allah

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

From Universals Revisited, Leap Day, 2012 —

Friday, January 23, 2015

Complex Symplectic Fantasy

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:08 PM

"We are not isolated free chosers,
monarchs of all we survey, but
benighted creatures sunk in a reality
whose nature we are constantly and
overwhelmingly tempted to deform
by fantasy."

—Iris Murdoch, "Against Dryness"
in Encounter , p. 20 of issue 88 
(vol. 16 no. 1, January 1961, pp. 16-20)

"We need to turn our attention away from the consoling
dream necessity of Romanticism, away from the dry
symbol, the bogus individual, the false whole, towards
the real impenetrable human person."

— Iris Murdoch, 1961

"Impenetrability!  That's what I  say!"

Humpty Dumpty, 1871

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Universals Revisited

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:06 PM

"Some philosophical pieces are like symphonies,
  others like quartets."

— Gustav Bergmann, "Frege's Hidden Nominalism,"
    The Philosophical Review
     Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 1958), pp. 437-459

See also Annals of Religion.

Monday, February 27, 2012

Annals of Religion

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:00 AM

"Allegorical pictures of contemporary events
 have a way of weaving in and out
 between the symbolic and the semi-psychotic."

 — Adam Gopnik in The New Yorker , issue dated March 5, 2012

See also Venue and Weaveworld .

Monday, April 12, 2010

Weaveworld

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:31 AM

"Fact and fiction weave in and out of novels
 like a shell game." –R. B. Kitaj
 as quoted by Marco Livingstone

'The Bourne Ultimatum,' starring Matt Damon, cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material: Prime Designer,
Shell Game, and Evil Daemon.

See also remarks by root@matrix.net.

Sunday, October 14, 2007

Sunday October 14, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:00 AM
The Dipolar God

Steven H. Cullinane, 'The Line'

“Logos and logic, crystal hypothesis,
Incipit and a form to speak the word
And every latent double in the word….”

— Wallace Stevens,
   “Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction

Yesterday’s meditation (“Simon’s Shema“) on the interpenetration of opposites continues:

Part I: The Jewel in the Lotus

“The fundamental conception of Tantric Buddhist metaphysics, namely, yuganaddha, signifies the coincidence of opposites.  It is symbolized by the conjugal embrace (maithuna or kama-kala) of a god and goddess or a Buddha and his consort (signifying karuna and sunyata or upaya and prajna, respectively), also commonly depicted in Tantric Buddhist iconography as the union of vajra (diamond sceptre) and padme (lotus flower).  Thus, yuganaddha essentially means the interpenetration of opposites or dipolar fusion, and is a fundamental restatement of Hua-yen theoretic structures.”

— p. 148 in “Part II: A Whiteheadian Process Critique of Hua-yen Buddhism,” in Process Metaphysics and Hua-Yen Buddhism: A Critical Study of Cumulative Penetration vs. Interpenetration (SUNY Series in Systematic Philosophy), by Steve Odin, State University of New York Press, 1982

Part II: The Dipolar God

And on p. 163 of Odin, op. cit., in “Part III: Theology of the Deep Unconscious: A Reconstruction of Process Theology,” in the section titled “Whitehead’s Dipolar God as the Collective Unconscious”–

“An effort is made to transpose Whitehead’s theory of the dipolar God into the terms of the collective unconscious, so that now the dipolar God is to be comprehended not as a transcendent deity, but the deepest dimension and highest potentiality of one’s own psyche.”

Part III: Piled High and Deep

Odin obtained his Ph.D. degree from the Department of Philosophy at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook in 1980. (See curriculum vitae (pdf).)

For an academic review of Odin’s book, see David Applebaum, Philosophy East and West, Vol. 34 (1984), pp. 107-108.

It is perhaps worth noting, in light of the final footnote of Mark D. Brimblecombe’s Ph.D. thesis “Dipolarity and Godquoted yesterday, that “tantra” is said to mean “loom.” For some less-academic background on the Tantric iconography Odin describes, see the webpage “Love and Passion in Tantric Buddhist Art.” For a fiction combining love and passion with the word “loom” in a religious context, see Clive Barker’s Weaveworld.  This fiction– which is, if not “supreme” in the Wallace Stevens sense, at least entertaining– may correspond to some aspects of the deep Jungian psychological reality discussed by Odin.

Happy Birthday,
Hannah Arendt

(Oct. 14, 1906-
Dec. 4, 1975)

OPPOSITES:

Hannah (Arendt) and Martin (Heidegger) as portrayed in a play of that name

Actors portraying
Arendt and Heidegger

Click on image for details.

Tuesday, August 22, 2006

Tuesday August 22, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Beginnings

“Nothing ever begins.

There is no first moment; no single word or place from which this or any other story springs.

The threads can always be traced back to some earlier tale, and to the tales that preceded that; though as the narrator’s voice recedes the connections will seem to grow more tenuous, for each age will want the tale told as if it were of its own making.”

— Clive Barker, Weaveworld

“No mathematical subject lies closer to intuition than the geometry of two and three dimensions.”

Robert E. Greene, beginning an April 1998 review of Three-Dimensional Geometry and Topology, by William P. Thurston

Thurston’s book provides some background for today’s opening lecture by Richard Hamilton, “The Poincare Conjecture,” at the beginning of the International Congress of Mathematicians in Madrid.

Hamilton is likely to discuss the Poincare conjecture in the wider context of Perelman‘s recent work on Thurston’s geometrization conjecture.

In “The Eight Model Geometries,” section 3.8 of his book, Thurston provides yet another beginning–

“What is a geometry?”

Saturday, August 19, 2006

Saturday August 19, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 4:28 PM
Metaphysical
Wonderlands

"With no means to verify its truth, superstring theory, in the words of Burton Richter, director emeritus of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, may turn out to be 'a kind of metaphysical wonderland.' Yet it is being pursued as vigorously as ever, its critics complain, treated as the only game in town."

— "The Inelegant Universe," by George Johnson, in the Sept. 2006 Scientific American

Some may prefer metaphysics of a different sort:

"To enter Cervantes’s world, we cross a threshold that is Shakespearean and quixotic into a metaphysical wonderland where time expands to become space and vast vaulted distances bend back on themselves, where the threads of fiction and the strands of history shuttle back and forth in the great loom of the artist’s imagination."

As wonderlands go, I personally prefer Clive Barker's Weaveworld.
 

Sunday, November 6, 2005

Sunday November 6, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:30 AM

For Mike Nichols,
whose birthday is today:

Angels in Arabia

Yesterday’s entries discussed an angel and a fugue; this suggests Clive Barker’s classic tale Weaveworld, which in turn suggests the following links:

1.  the Log24 archive,
     Aug. 1-6, 2005, and

2.  C. S. Lewis, George Orwell, and
     the Corruption of Language,

an essay at the website of
St. Christopher’s Cathedral
in Bahrain, Arabia.

Nichols, who is Jewish, may of course prefer the following remark of comedian Sarah Silverman:

“I wear this St. Christopher medal sometimes because– I’m Jewish, but my boyfriend is Catholic– it was cute the way he gave it to me. He said if it doesn’t burn through my skin it will protect me.”

Saturday, August 6, 2005

Saturday August 6, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:25 PM

The Fugue

   "True joy is a profound remembering, and true grief is the same.
    Thus it was, when the dust storm that had snatched Cal up finally died, and he opened his eyes to see the Fugue spread out before him, he felt as though the few fragile moments of epiphany he'd tasted in his twenty-six years– tasted but always lost– were here redeemed and wed. He'd grasped fragments of this delight before. Heard rumour of it in the womb-dream and the dream of love; known it in lullabies. But never, until now, the whole, the thing entire.
    It would be, he idly thought, a fine time to die.
    And a finer time still to live, with so much laid out before him."

— Clive Barker,
Weaveworld,
 Book Two:
The Fugue

From Monday:

Weaveworld,
Book Three:
Out of the
Empty Quarter

"The wheels of its body rolled,
the visible mathematics
    of its essence turning on itself…."

From Friday:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/050806-Square.bmp” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

  For the meaning
of this picture, see
Geometry of the
4×4 Square.

For graphic designs
based on this geometry,
see Theme and Variations
and Diamond Theory.

For these designs in the
context of a Bach fugue,
see Timothy A. Smith's
essay (pdf) on

Fugue No. 21 in B-Flat Major
from Book II of
The Well-Tempered Clavier
by Johann Sebastian Bach.

Smith also offers a
Shockwave movie
that uses diamond theory
to illustrate this fugue.

Friday, August 5, 2005

Friday August 5, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:23 PM

For Sir Alec

From Elegance:

"Philosophers ponder the idea of identity: what it is to give something a name on Monday and have it respond to that name on Friday…."

— Bernard Holland, page C12,
    The New York Times,
    Monday, May 20, 1996.

Holland was pondering the identity of the Juilliard String Quartet, which had just given a series of concerts celebrating its fiftieth anniversary.

"Elegant"

— Page one,
    The New York Times,
    Monday, August 7, 2000.
 
The Times was describing the work of Sir Alec Guinness, who died on 8/5/00.

An example of the Holland name problem:

Monday, August 1, 2005 — Visible Mathematics:

    "Earlier, there had been mapping projects in Saudi Arabia's Rub' al-Khali, the Empty Quarter in the south and west of the country….
   '
"Empty" is a misnomer…  the Rub' al-Khali contains many hidden riches.'"

Friday, August 5, 2005 —  

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/050805-Rag.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

Geometry for Prince Harry

Tuesday, August 2, 2005

Tuesday August 2, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 5:24 AM

Final Arrangements, continued
 

Kismet

From yesterday's Log24
Clive Barker's Weaveworld:

Another of the angel's attributes rose from memory now, and with it a sudden shock of comprehension.  Uriel had been the angel left to stand guard at the gates of Eden.
    Eden.
    At the word, the creature blazed.  Though the ages had driven it to grief and forgetfulness, it was still an angel: its fires unquenchable.  The wheels of its body rolled, the visible mathematics of its essence turning on itself and preparing for new terrors.
    There were others here, the Seraph said, that called this place Eden.  But I never knew it by that name.
    "What, then?" Shadwell asked.
    Paradise, said the Angel, and at the word a new picture appeared in Shadwell's mind.  It was the garden, in another age….
    This was a place of making, the Angel said.  Forever and ever.  Where things came to be.
    "To be?"
    To find a form, and enter the world.

If I stand starry-eyed
That's a danger in paradise
For mortals who stand beside
  An angel like you.

Robert Wright and George Forrest

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/050802-NYTobits2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
 

Monday, August 1, 2005

Monday August 1, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM
Visible Mathematics

    "Earlier, there had been mapping projects in Saudi Arabia's Rub' al-Khali, the Empty Quarter in the south and west of the country….
     '
"Empty" is a misnomer…  the Rub' al-Khali contains many hidden riches.'"

Maps from the Sky,
   Saudi Aramco World, March/April 1995

From Weaveworld

Book Three:
Out of the Empty Quarter,
 by Clive Barker, 1987:


… As a child he'd learned the names of all the angels and archangels by heart: and among the mighty, Uriel was of the mightiest.  The archangel of salvation: called by some the flame of God…. What had he done, stepping into the presence of such power?  This was Uriel, of the principalities….
    Another of the angel's attributes rose from memory now, and with it a sudden shock of comprehension.  Uriel had been the angel left to stand guard at the gates of Eden.
    Eden.
    At the word, the creature blazed.  Though the ages had driven it to grief and forgetfulness, it was still an angel: its fires unquenchable.  The wheels of its body rolled, the visible mathematics of its essence turning on itself and preparing for new terrors.
    There were others here, the Seraph said, that called this place Eden.  But I never knew it by that name.
    "What, then?" Shadwell asked.
    Paradise, said the Angel, and at the word a new picture appeared in Shadwell's mind.  It was the garden, in another age….
    This was a place of making, the Angel said.  Forever and ever.  Where things came to be.
    "To be?"
    To find a form, and enter the world.

 

"The serpent's eyes shine
As he wraps around the vine
In the Garden of Allah."

Don Henley, 1995  
 

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