Log24

Monday, April 5, 2021

A New (Old) Key* for Philosophy

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 PM

* See other posts tagged Langer Key.

Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Checked Cell*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:20 AM

* For the title —

See as well some related philosophy.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Plastic Elements

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 7:07 AM

"Step by step, Kepes follows the liberation of the plastic elements:
lines, planes, and colors, and the creation of a world of forms of our own.
The spatial conception interconnects the meaning fragments and
binds them together just as in another period perspective did when it used
a single station point for naturalistic representation."

— S. Giedion, introduction to Language of Vision  by Gyorgy Kepes 

Saturday, January 11, 2020

Mathematical Theology (“Art School Confidential” continues.)

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:07 PM

Detail of artwork by Josefine Lyche, 2010

Related academic remarks:

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Invisible Weaving

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:13 AM

See as well a post from this journal on the above date
June 12, 2014. (That post revisits a post from today's  date —
January 7 — eight years ago, in 2012.)

Related material:  Dharma Fabric and Symplectic.

Dharma Fabric

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:42 AM

Lines from "Description Without Place" —

"An age is green or red. An age believes

Or it denies. An age is solitude
Or a barricade against the singular man

By the incalculably plural."

— Wallace Stevens

Monday, January 6, 2020

Art for Optimus Prime

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:35 PM

A 2020 Manifesto

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:33 PM

Art as Experience (Minus Baldessari)

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:36 PM

In memory of an artist who reportedly died in Venice, CA, on Jan. 2 —

Two quotes from the website Quotes Sayings

"I always felt like I was right out of Dickens, looking in the window
of the Christmas feast, but not at the feast." — John Baldessari

"A TWO-DIMENSIONAL SURFACE WITHOUT ANY ARTICULATION
IS A DEAD EXPERIENCE" — John Baldessari

The "dead experience" quote is actually from Gyorgy Kepes:

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Philosophy in a New Key

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:29 AM

(With apologies to Susanne K. Langernée  Susanne Katherina Knauth)

Google search for 'buzzard key proof'

See too the buzzard-related Catch-22 song

Monday, October 21, 2019

New Key

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:22 AM

 

Sunday, October 13, 2019

Langer

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

"Visual forms— lines, colors, proportions, etc.—
are just as capable of articulation ,
i.e. of complex combination, as words.
But the laws that govern this sort of articulation
are altogether different from the laws of syntax
that govern language. The most radical difference
is that visual forms are not discursive .
They do not present their constituents successively,
but simultaneously, so the relations determining
a visual structure are grasped in one act of vision."

— Susanne K. LangerPhilosophy in a New Key

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Articulation

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 10:30 PM

Cassirer vs. Heidegger at Harvard —

A remembrance for Michaelmas —

A version of Heidegger’s “Sternwürfel ” —

From Log24 on the upload date for the above figure —

Sunday, July 3, 2016

Articulation

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:10 AM

Notes for a monkey grammarian

"Visual forms— lines, colors, proportions, etc.—
are just as capable of articulation ,
i.e. of complex combination, as words.
But the laws that govern this sort of articulation
are altogether different from the laws of syntax
that govern language. The most radical difference
is that visual forms are not discursive .
They do not present their constituents successively,
but simultaneously, so the relations determining
a visual structure are grasped in one act of vision."

— Susanne K. LangerPhilosophy in a New Key

See also Langer's New Key in this journal.

Related material —

Monday, June 20, 2016

Shema, Salinger

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

"I've got a brand-new pair of roller skates "

Melanie, 1971

Related material —  Salinger in the Park and
                                 Philosophy in a New Key.

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Tonic

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 PM

Related posts:
New Key and The Well-Tempered Monolith.

Hold the gin.

Friday, October 24, 2014

New Key

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

See Langer (Harvard U. Press, Third Edition, Jan. 31, 1957, pp. 3-4-5).

See also Old Key : Pythagoras, harmony, and the 3-4-5 triangle.

Sunday, September 7, 2014

Sunday School

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:28 AM

In memory of Joan Rivers

Heaven's Gate

This post was suggested by the previous post‘s quote

“the subject’s desires are scripted and orchestrated
by an unconscious fundamental fantasy,”

and by one of my favorite musical fantasies:

Melanie – Brand New Key (’71) .

Academics may prefer the following —

Susanne K. Langer,'Philosophy in a New Key'

Monday, August 11, 2014

Syntactic/Symplectic

(Continued from August 9, 2014.)

Syntactic:

Symplectic:

"Visual forms— lines, colors, proportions, etc.— are just as capable of
articulation , i.e. of complex combination, as words. But the laws that govern
this sort of articulation are altogether different from the laws of syntax that
govern language. The most radical difference is that visual forms are not
discursive 
. They do not present their constituents successively, but
simultaneously, so the relations determining a visual structure are grasped
in one act of vision."

– Susanne K. LangerPhilosophy in a New Key

For examples, see The Diamond-Theorem Correlation
in Rosenhain and Göpel Tetrads in PG(3,2).

This is a symplectic  correlation,* constructed using the following
visual structure:

IMAGE- A symplectic structure -- i.e. a structure that is symplectic (meaning plaited or woven).

* Defined in (for instance) Paul B. Yale, Geometry and Symmetry ,
Holden-Day, 1968, sections 6.9 and 6.10.

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Under Covers

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:06 PM

For Amy Adams and Trudie Styler:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101027-LangerSymbolicLogic.jpg

Click each cover for some background. See also

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Women’s History Month

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Susanne for Suzanne

From pages 7-8 of William York Tindall’s Literary Symbolism  (Columbia U. Press, 1955)—

                                     ... According to Cassirer's Essay 
on Man, as we have seen, art is a symbolic form, parallel in respect 
of this to religion or science. Each of these forms builds up a universe 
that enables man to interpret and organize his experience; and each 
is a discovery, because a creation, of reality. Although similar in func- 
tion, the forms differ in the kind of reality built. Whereas science
builds it of facts, art builds it of feelings, intuitions of quality, and 
the other distractions of our inner life— and in their degrees so do 
myth and religion. What art, myth, and religion are, Cassirer con- 
fesses, cannot be expressed by a logical definition. 

Nevertheless, let us see what Clive Bell says about art. He calls 
it "significant form," but what that is he is unable to say. Having 
no quarrel with art as form, we may, however, question its signifi- 
cance. By significant he cannot mean important in the sense of 
having import, nor can he mean having the function of a sign; 
for to him art, lacking reference to nature, is insignificant. Since, 
however, he tells us that a work of art "expresses" the emotion of 
its creator and "provokes" an emotion in its contemplator,he seems 
to imply that his significant means expressive and provocative. The 
emotion expressed and provoked is an "aesthetic emotion," contem- 
plative, detached from all concerns of utility and from all reference. 

Attempting to explain Bell's significant form, Roger Fry, equally 
devoted to Whistler and art for art's sake, says that Flaubert's "ex- 
pression of the idea" is as near as he can get to it, but neither Flaubert 
nor Fry tells what is meant by idea. To "evoke" it, however, the artist 
creates an "expressive design" or "symbolic form," by which the 
spirit "communicates its most secret and indefinable impulses." 

Susanne Langer,who occupies a place somewhere between Fry 
and Cassirer, though nearer the latter, once said in a seminar that a 
work of art is an "unassigned syntactical symbol." Since this defini- 

End of page 7 

tion does not appear in her latest book, she may have rejected it, but 
it seems far more precise than Fry's attempt. By unassigned she prob- 
ably intends insignificant in the sense of lacking sign value or fixed 
reference; syntactical implies a form composed of parts in relation- 
ship to one another; and a symbol, according to Feeling and Form, 
is "any device whereby we are enabled to make an abstraction." Too 
austere for my taste, this account of symbol seems to need elaboration, 
which, to be sure, her book provides. For the present, however, taking 
symbol to mean an outward device for presenting an inward state, 
and taking unassigned and syntactical as I think she uses them, let 
us tentatively admire her definition of the work of art.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110301-VegaSongsSm.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110301-Diamond-RedOnGray.bmp

Oh, the red leaf looks to the hard gray stone
To each other, they know what they mean

— Suzanne Vega, “Song in Red and Gray

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

An Abstract Power

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:45 AM

Two characters named “Black” and “White” debate religion and the afterlife in the Cormac McCarthy play “The Sunset Limited.”

The play opened in Chicago in a Steppenwolf Theatre production on May 18, 2006.

A New York Times  theater review from All Hallows’ Eve, 2006—

“…there is an abstract power in the mysteriousness of Mr. McCarthy’s
vision’s allowing for a multitude of interpretations.” –Jason Zinoman

The current New Yorker  (Feb.14) has a note
by Lillian Ross on the same play— “Two-Man Show: O Death

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110209-TwoManShow.gif

Some purely visual black-and-white variations that are less dramatic, but have their own “abstract power”—

A book cover pictured here last November to contrast with
“the sound and fury of the rarified Manhattan art world”—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101027-LangerSymbolicLogic.jpg

and a web page with multiple interpretations of the book cover’s pattern—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110209-SymFrameBWPage.gif

A synchronicity— The first version of “Symmetry Framed” was done
on May 18, 2006— the day “The Sunset Limited” opened.

Another synchronicity relates the mathematics underlying
such patterns to the Halloween date of the above review.
See “To Announce a Faith,” from October 31, 2006.

Monday, November 22, 2010

Backstory

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:48 AM

Steve Martin’s new novel An Object of Beauty  will be released tomorrow.

“The most charmingly rendered female schemer since Truman Capote’s Holly Golightly.”
Elle  magazine

“Martin compresses the wild and crazy end of the millennium
and finds in this piercing novel a sardonic morality tale….
Exposes the sound and fury of the rarified Manhattan art world.”
Publishers Weekly

“Like Steve Martin’s Shopgirl , this very different novel will captivate your attention from start to finish.”
— Joyce Carol Oates

Martin on his character Ray Porter in the novella Shopgirl  (published Oct. 11, 2000)—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101122-MartinShopgirl-loq.jpg

“He said, ‘I wrote a piece of code
that they just can’t seem to do without.’
He was a symbolic logician. That was his career….”

As the above review notes, Martin’s new book is about art at the end of the millennium.

See also Art Wars: Geometry as Conceptual Art
and some of my own notes from 2000 (March 9) in “Is Nothing Sacred?

Some related material —

A paperback with a striking cover (artist unknown)—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101027-LangerSymbolicLogic.jpg

Note that the background may be constructed from
any of four distinct motifs. For another approach to these
motifs in a philosophical context, see June 8, 2010.

“Visual forms— lines, colors, proportions, etc.— are just as capable of articulation , i.e. of complex combination, as words. But the laws that govern this sort of articulation are altogether different from the laws of syntax that govern language. The most radical difference is that visual forms are not discursive . They do not present their constituents successively, but simultaneously, so the relations determining a visual structure are grasped in one act of vision.”

Susanne K. Langer, Philosophy in a New Key

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Language and Form

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 AM

In memory of S. Neil Fujita, who died last Saturday—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101027-PhilosophicalSketches2.jpg

Fujita did the cover art for this edition.

Another book by Langer with a striking cover (artist unknown)—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101027-LangerSymbolicLogic.jpg

Note that the background may be constructed from
any of four distinct motifs. For another approach to these
motifs in a philosophical context, see June 8, 2010.

"Visual forms— lines, colors, proportions, etc.— are just as capable of articulation , i.e. of complex combination, as words. But the laws that govern this sort of articulation are altogether different from the laws of syntax that govern language. The most radical difference is that visual forms are not discursive . They do not present their constituents successively, but simultaneously, so the relations determining a visual structure are grasped in one act of vision."
Susanne K. Langer, Philosophy in a New Key

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