Log24

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Tiger Leap

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:18 AM

(Continued)

Walter Benjamin on 'a tiger's leap into the past'

See also RIP: The Peace of Pi —

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Tiger’s Leap  to 1905

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:03 PM

Walter Benjamin on 'a tiger's leap into the past'

See other posts
now tagged
Crosswicks Curse.

 

Click to enlarge:

Block Designs?

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Tiger Leaps

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:33 AM

Walter Benjamin on 'a tiger's leap into the past'

See also Tiger in this journal, esp.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050123-Tiger.JPG” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.   and . . .

other "Death and the Spirit" posts.

Wednesday, June 5, 2019

The Tigerman Kaballah

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 4:00 AM

See also Life of Pi   in this  journal.

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Tiger Beat

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110413-NYTobits.jpg

Related material: Canon Avril in TIger in the Smoke .

Monday, December 9, 2019

Plan 9 from Deep Space

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM

A search for "deep space" in this journal yields
the following meditation:

Alfred Bester, Tiger! Tiger!:

Gully Foyle is my name
And Terra is my nation
Deep space is my dwelling place
The stars my destination

Friday, July 19, 2019

Shadowhunting: Life of Pi

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 AM

Images from Log24 yesterday . . .

And from The New Yorker  yesterday . . .

See also RIP: The Peace of Pi

Saturday, July 13, 2019

Live from New York, It’s …

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 11:30 PM

Curse of the Fire Temple

"Power outages hit parts of Manhattan
plunging subways, Broadway, into darkness"

New York Post  this evening

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

RIP

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:16 AM

Wikipedia

"Elmore Rual 'Rip' Torn Jr. (February 6, 1931 – July 9, 2019)
 was an American actor, voice artist Torn was born in
Temple, Texas,
on February 6, 1931, the son of Elmore Rual "Tiger" Torn Sr. and
Thelma Mary Torn (née Spacek)."

For the Church of Synchronology

The above photo was reportedly taken on March 10, 2011.

An image from this journal on that date

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110310-CrimsonSm.jpg

Found in translation — See "Ex Fano " in this  journal
and the Fano post "In Nomine Patris."

Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Zen and the Art

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 6:13 PM

Or:  Burning Bright

A post in memory of Chicago architect Stanley Tigerman,
who reportedly died at 88 on Monday.

Saturday, April 28, 2018

RIP: The Peace of Pi

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:45 PM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/100907-WickerManFireLeapScene.jpg

Monday, April 9, 2018

The Long Hello

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:17 PM

Transportes Ometochtli   >>

Es la línea de transporte más antigua que va de Cuernavaca a Tepoztlán . . . .

Image from the 1973 Elliott Gould film "The Long Goodbye" —

Some backstory . . . .

  1. https://hidden-films.com/2014/11/09/the-little-movie-that-couldnt-
    an-oral-history-of-elliott-goulds-never-completed-a-glimpse-of-tiger/

     
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Glimpse_of_Tiger
     
  3. http://m759.net/wordpress/?p=71956 —

Monday, January 8, 2018

Time

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM 

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Die Welt, Die Zeit, and the Frankfurter

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:42 PM

"Risin' up to the challenge of our rival" — Eye of the Tiger

Friday, February 23, 2018

Snow Games

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:42 AM

'Origin' (NOT by Dan Brown)

Related material — (Click to enlarge) —

"Risin' up to the challenge of our rival"

Eye of the Tiger

Detail —

Saturday, March 25, 2017

Like Decorations in a Cartoon Graveyard

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 AM

Continued from April 11, 2016, and from

A tribute to Rothko suggested by the previous post

For the idea  of Rothko's obstacles, see Hexagram 39 in this journal.

Friday, December 16, 2016

Rothko’s Swamps

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:45 AM

"… you don’t write off an aging loved one
just because he or she becomes cranky."

— Peter Schjeldahl on Rothko in The New Yorker ,
issue dated December 19 & 26, 2016, page 27

He was cranky in his forties too —

See Rothko + Swamp in this journal.

Related attitude —

From Subway Art for Times Square Church , Nov. 7

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Midnight Special

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 AM



Thursday, February 4, 2016

Dating a Tigress

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:40 AM

Continued from January 18, 2005 —

See Lili Anolik, "Tiger of the Week," in Princeton Alumni Weekly  
on April 29, 2015, and this journal on that date.

(This post was suggested by the following sentence
by Anolik in Vanity Fair 's current Hollywood issue

"I think that for the city of Los Angeles,
Didion is the Ángel de la Muerte.")

Saturday, August 22, 2015

A Tony for Kristen*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:48 PM

From Kulturkampf for Princeton (Jan. 14, 2015) —

A sequel to Princeton Requiem,
Gesamtkunstwerk , and Serial Box —

Fearful Symmetry, Princeton Style:

       * Wiig.  See Dancer (June 10, 2013).  Happy birthday.

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Burning Bright

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:01 PM

For Mark Steinberg, sports agent .

From Field Notes (9:29 AM ET Saturday, Nov. 28, 2009) —

Elements of Story, by Francis Flaherty

From the heraldic crest of Steinberg's fraternity :

"Remember me to Herald Square."

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Kulturkampf for Princeton*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:01 PM

Einstein and Thomas Mann (author of 'The Magic Mountain') at Princeton
Einstein and Thomas Mann, Princeton, 1938

A sequel to Princeton Requiem,
Gesamtkunstwerk , and Serial Box — 

Fearful Symmetry, Princeton Style:

* See as well other instances of Kulturkampf  in this journal.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Dead Poet

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

For poet Galway Kinnell, Princeton ’48:

Kinnell was named “Tiger of the Week” in a
Princeton Alumni Weekly  post of August 27, 2014.

See his obituary in today’s New York Times
as well as posts here  on August 27, 2014.

Saturday, March 2, 2013

Life of Pi

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:06 AM

Earlier

Princeton Harvard Eating —

Harvard Math Department Pi Day event

"But the tigers come at night,
With their voices soft as thunder."

Les Miserables

Sunday, January 30, 2011

Sermon

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Today's sermon, suggested by yesterday's New York midday and evening lottery— "6/18 and 4/18."

Background for 6/18— Go Tigers!

6/18

Background for 4/18— Requiem for an Editor*

4/18

* See "Sally Menke, Tarantino's Editor, Dies."

Saturday, April 3, 2010

Infinite Jest

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:05 AM

"Democrats– in conclusion– Democrats in America
were put on earth to do one thing– Drag the
ignorant hillbilly half of this country into the next
century, which in their case is the 19th."

Bill Maher on March 26

Reply to Maher:

"Hell is other people."
— Jean-Paul Sartre

With a laugh track.

Related material:

Dragging Maher into the 18th  century–

From
N. H. Abel on Elliptic Functions:
Problems of Division and Reduction
,
by Henrik Kragh Sørensen —

Related material– Lemniscate to Langlands (2004)
and references to the lemniscate in
Galois Theory, by David A. Cox (Wiley-IEEE, 2004)

Sunday, March 28, 2010

The Palm at the End of the Mind

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:12 AM

"Democrats– in conclusion– Democrats in America
were put on earth to do one thing— Drag the
ignorant hillbilly half of this country into the next
century, which in their case is the 19th."

Bill Maher on Friday

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100328-Maher.jpg

Happy Palm Sunday
to Appalachia and
Happy Birthday, Reba

Monday, January 4, 2010

Google’s Apple Tree

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:30 AM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100104-Apple.jpg

Google has illuminated its search page today with a falling apple in honor of what it is pleased to call the birthday of Newton. (When Newton was born, the calendar showed it was Christmas Day, 1642; Google prefers to associate Sir Isaac with a later version of the calendar.)

Some related observations–

Adapted from a Log24 entry
of Monday, March 24, 2008–
 

 

"Hanging from the highest limb
of the apple tree are
     the three God's Eyes…"

    — Ken Kesey

"But what's beautiful can't be bad. You're not bad, North Wind?"

"No; I'm not bad. But sometimes beautiful things grow bad by doing bad, and it takes some time for their badness to spoil their beauty. So little boys may be mistaken if they go after things because they are beautiful."

"Well, I will go with you because you are beautiful and good, too."

"Ah, but there's another thing, Diamond:– What if I should look ugly without being bad– look ugly myself because I am making ugly things beautiful?– What then?"

"I don't quite understand you, North Wind. You tell me what then."

"Well, I will tell you. If you see me with my face all black, don't be frightened. If you see me flapping wings like a bat's, as big as the whole sky, don't be frightened. If you hear me raging ten times worse than Mrs. Bill, the blacksmith's wife– even if you see me looking in at people's windows like Mrs. Eve Dropper, the gardener's wife– you must believe that I am doing my work. Nay, Diamond, if I change into a serpent or a tiger, you must not let go your hold of me, for my hand will never change in yours if you keep a good hold. If you keep a hold, you will know who I am all the time, even when you look at me and can't see me the least like the North Wind. I may look something very awful. Do you understand?"

"Quite well," said little Diamond.

"Come along, then," said North Wind, and disappeared behind the mountain of hay.

Diamond crept out of bed and followed her.

    — George MacDonald,
      At the Back of the North Wind

   

From Log24 on Sunday, March 23, 2008–

 
A sequel to
The Crimson Passion

Easter Egg

Jill St. John with diamond

Click on image
 for further details.


Duality:


A pair of book covers in honor
  of the dies natalis of T. S. Eliot–

http://www.log24.com/log10/saved/100103-TheAristocrat_files/100104-Duality.jpg

From Virginia Woolf,  "Modern Fiction" (Ch. 13 in The Common Reader, First Series)

Woolf on what she calls "materialist" fiction–

Life escapes; and perhaps without life nothing else is worth while. It is a confession of vagueness to have to make use of such a figure as this, but we scarcely better the matter by speaking, as critics are prone to do, of reality. Admitting the vagueness which afflicts all criticism of novels, let us hazard the opinion that for us at this moment the form of fiction most in vogue more often misses than secures the thing we seek. Whether we call it life or spirit, truth or reality, this, the essential thing, has moved off, or on, and refuses to be contained any longer in such ill-fitting vestments as we provide. Nevertheless, we go on perseveringly, conscientiously, constructing our two and thirty chapters after a design which more and more ceases to resemble the vision in our minds. So much of the enormous labour of proving the solidity, the likeness to life, of the story is not merely labour thrown away but labour misplaced to the extent of obscuring and blotting out the light of the conception. The writer seems constrained, not by his own free will but by some powerful and unscrupulous tyrant who has him in thrall, to provide a plot, to provide comedy, tragedy, love interest, and an air of probability embalming the whole so impeccable that if all his figures were to come to life they would find themselves dressed down to the last button of their coats in the fashion of the hour. The tyrant is obeyed; the novel is done to a turn. But sometimes, more and more often as time goes by, we suspect a momentary doubt, a spasm of rebellion, as the pages fill themselves in the customary way. Is life like this? Must novels be like this?

Look within and life, it seems, is very far from being “like this”. Examine for a moment an ordinary mind on an ordinary day. The mind receives a myriad impressions—trivial, fantastic, evanescent, or engraved with the sharpness of steel. From all sides they come, an incessant shower of innumerable atoms; and as they fall, as they shape themselves into the life of Monday or Tuesday, the accent falls differently from of old; the moment of importance came not here but there; so that, if a writer were a free man and not a slave, if he could write what he chose, not what he must, if he could base his work upon his own feeling and not upon convention, there would be no plot, no comedy, no tragedy, no love interest or catastrophe in the accepted style, and perhaps not a single button sewn on as the Bond Street tailors would have it. Life is not a series of gig lamps symmetrically arranged; life is a luminous halo, a semi-transparent envelope surrounding us from the beginning of consciousness to the end. Is it not the task of the novelist to convey this varying, this unknown and uncircumscribed spirit, whatever aberration or complexity it may display, with as little mixture of the alien and external as possible? We are not pleading merely for courage and sincerity; we are suggesting that the proper stuff of fiction is a little other than custom would have us believe it.

It is, at any rate, in some such fashion as this that we seek to define the quality which distinguishes the work of several young writers, among whom Mr. James Joyce is the most notable….

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Merry Xmas from Arthur C. Clarke

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:09 PM

Well-Recognized

Some personal reminiscences from 1982
suggested the following notes on
yesterday’s thought from Arthur C. Clarke–

“Any sufficiently advanced technology
is indistinguishable from magic.”

‘Abracadabra’ is a well-recognized song recorded by the Steve Miller Band.

Released as the main single from Abracadabra in June 1982, it became a number-one hit on the United States Billboard Hot 100 chart, and also hit number two on the UK charts. It followed Survivor‘s ‘Eye of the Tiger‘ (from Rocky III ) on the Hot 100….” –Wikipedia

Advanced Technology:

MST 682 Advanced Topics in
Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM)

An overview of the components of CIM Enterprise, System Design, Material Handling, Materials Requirement Planning (MRP), Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRPII), Manufacturing Database and Management, Expert Systems for Manufacturing. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: An undergraduate course in CAD or CAM or CIM, or consent of instructor. —SUNY Institute of Technology

Magic:

Christian Surrealism,” an entry in this journal on Dec. 15, 2009, at 5:26 PM.

The time 5:26 may of course be interpreted as a reference to the date 5/26.

Technology and Magic:

NY Lottery yesterday, Dec. 16: mid-day 682, evening 526.

Friday, July 3, 2009

Friday July 3, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:00 AM
Damnation Morning
continued

“The tigers of wrath are wiser
    than the horses of instruction.”

Blake

“… the moment is not
properly an atom of time
 but an atom of eternity.
 It is the first reflection
 of eternity in time, its first
attempt, as it were, at
       stopping time….”
 
Kierkegaard

Symmetry Axes
of the Square:

Symmetry axes of the square

(Damnation Morning)

From the cover of the
 Martin Cruz Smith novel
Stallion Gate:

Image of an atom from the cover of the novel 'Stallion Gate'

A Monolith
for Kierkegaard:


Images of time and eternity in memory of Michelangelo


Todo lo sé por el lucero puro
que brilla en la diadema de la Muerte.

Rubén Darío

Related material:

The deaths of
 Ernest Hemingway
on the morning of
Sunday, July 2, 1961,
and of Alexis Arguello
on the morning of
Wednesday, July 1, 2009.
See also philosophy professor
Clancy Martin in the
London Review of Books
(issue dated July 9, 2009)
 on AA members as losers
“the ‘last men,’ the nihilists,
 the hopeless ones.”

Saturday, January 31, 2009

Saturday January 31, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Catholic Schools Week

Today is the conclusion of
 Catholic Schools Week.

From one such school,
Cullinane College:

Cullinane College school spirit

Cullinane students
display school spirit

Related material:
 

James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man:

 

He turned to the flyleaf of the geography and read what he had written there: himself, his name and where he was.

Stephen Dedalus
Class of Elements
Clongowes Wood College
Sallins
County Kildare
Ireland
Europe
The World
The Universe

That was in his writing: and Fleming one night for a cod had written on the opposite page:

Stephen Dedalus is my name,
Ireland is my nation.
Clongowes is my dwellingplace
And heaven my expectation.

He read the verses backwards but then they were not poetry. Then he read the flyleaf from the bottom to the top till he came to his own name. That was he: and he read down the page again. What was after the universe?

Nothing. But was there anything round the universe to show where it stopped before the nothing place began?

 

Alfred Bester, Tiger! Tiger!:

 

Gully Foyle is my name
And Terra is my nation
Deep space is my dwelling place
The stars my destination

"Guilty! Read the Charge!"
— Quoted here on
January 29, 2003

The Prisoner,
Episode One, 1967:
"I… I meant a larger map."
— Quoted here on
January 27, 2009

 

Monday, March 24, 2008

Monday March 24, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:00 PM

Death and
the Apple Tree

Today's New York Times on the late "fifth Beatle" Neil Aspinall, who died Easter night in Manhattan:

"… he played tambura (an Indian drone instrument) on 'Within You Without You'."

Related material:

In the Details

Valentine to a Dark Lady

"Hanging from the highest limb
of the apple tree are
     the three God's Eyes…"

    — Ken Kesey  

"But what's beautiful can't be bad. You're not bad, North Wind?"

"No; I'm not bad. But sometimes beautiful things grow bad by doing bad, and it takes some time for their badness to spoil their beauty. So little boys may be mistaken if they go after things because they are beautiful."

"Well, I will go with you because you are beautiful and good, too."

"Ah, but there's another thing, Diamond:– What if I should look ugly without being bad– look ugly myself because I am making ugly things beautiful?– What then?"

"I don't quite understand you, North Wind. You tell me what then."

"Well, I will tell you. If you see me with my face all black, don't be frightened. If you see me flapping wings like a bat's, as big as the whole sky, don't be frightened. If you hear me raging ten times worse than Mrs. Bill, the blacksmith's wife– even if you see me looking in at people's windows like Mrs. Eve Dropper, the gardener's wife– you must believe that I am doing my work. Nay, Diamond, if I change into a serpent or a tiger, you must not let go your hold of me, for my hand will never change in yours if you keep a good hold. If you keep a hold, you will know who I am all the time, even when you look at me and can't see me the least like the North Wind. I may look something very awful. Do you understand?"

"Quite well," said little Diamond.

"Come along, then," said North Wind, and disappeared behind the mountain of hay.

Diamond crept out of bed and followed her.

    — George MacDonald,
      At the Back of the North Wind

Thursday, January 3, 2008

Thursday January 3, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:01 PM
Context-Sensitive Theology
continued:

The Revelation Game 
 
New Year’s reading for
the tigers of Princeton

 
Two reviews from the February 2008 Notices of the American Mathematical Society:

From a review of

A Certain Ambiguity
(A Mathematical Novel)

by Gaurav Suri and Hartosh Singh Bal
Princeton University Press
Hardcover, US$27.95, 281 pages —

“From the Habermas-Lyotard debate (see [1] for an introduction) to the Sokal hoax ([4]), to recent atheist manifestos on the bestseller lists (e.g., [2]) the question of foundations for intellectual thought and especially for intellectual debate has never been more critical or urgent.”

[1] M. Bérubé, What’s Liberal about the Liberal Arts? Classroom Politics and “Bias” in Higher Education, W. W. Norton, 2006.
[2] S. Harris, Letter to a Christian Nation, Knopf, 2006.
[4] A. Sokal and P. Bricmont, Fashionable Nonsense: Postmodern Intellectuals’ Abuse of Science, Picador, 1999.

Danny Calegari of Caltech

Also in the February Notices– a review of a book, Superior Beings: If They Exist, How Would We Know?, in which the author

“.. uses elementary ideas from game theory to create situations between a Person (P) and God (Supreme Being, SB) and discusses how each reacts to the other in these model scenarios….

In the ‘Revelation Game,’ for example,
the Person (P) has two options:
1) P can believe in SB’s existence
2) P can not believe in SB’s existence
The Supreme Being also has two options:
1) SB can reveal Himself
2) SB can not reveal Himself….

… [and] goals allow us to rank all the outcomes for each player from best… to worst…. The question we must answer is: what is the Nash equilibrium in this case?”

The answer is what one might expect from the American Mathematical Society:

“… the dominant strategy for both is when SB does not reveal Himself and P does not believe in His existence.”

Other strategies are, of course, possible. See last year’s entries.

See also
the life of John Nash,

http://www.log24.com/log/pix08/080103-BeautifulMind.jpg

for whom the above
equilibrium is named.

Monday, December 31, 2007

Monday December 31, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:25 PM
Happy New Year
from Steven Priest

"… and the girl in the corner
      is everyone's mourner…."

Stevie Nicks to appear on Groundhog Day

The Priest quotation appeared here
on Grammy Night 2003 with
another musical meditation:

"Her wall is filled with pictures,
She gets 'em one by one."

— "Sweet Little Sixteen,"
by Chuck Berry
(Chess Records, January 1958)

Sunday, December 30, 2007

Sunday December 30, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM
The Christmas Tiger

Part I:
The Gauntlet

On Jonah Goldberg's new book Liberal Fascism– an attack on, among others, Woodrow Wilson:

"'… at some point,' Goldberg writes, 'it is necessary to throw down the gauntlet, to draw a line in the sand, to set a boundary, to cry at long last, "Enough is enough."'"
 

The Goldberg declaration is from a review in today's New York Times titled "Heil Woodrow!"

 


Part II:
Uncle Duke
Goes to Washington

Today's Doonesbury:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix07A/071230-Doonesbury2.jpg


Part III:
A Holiday Tradition

Dialogue from the classic Capra film "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington"–

SUMMERS: When the country needs men up there who know and have courage as it never did before, he's just gonna decorate a chair and get himself honored.

DARRELL: Oh, but he'll vote! Sure. Just like his colleague tells him to.

DIZ: "Yes, sir," like a Christmas tiger. He'll nod his head and vote…

REPORTERS: "Yes."

DIZ: You're not a Senator! You're an honorary stooge! You ought to be shown up!

The film starred
James Stewart,
Princeton
Class of 1932.


Part IV:
The Tigers of Princeton

The Christmas evening Pennsylvania Lottery 4-digit number was 0666, the Christian "number of the beast." For the beast itself, see the Dec. 3 Log24 entry "Santa's Polar Opposite?" with its link to a discussion of a metaphorical tiger at the South Pole. A more realistic version of the beast appeared in the news on Christmas evening.

The Christmas number may also be interpreted as a reference to 6/6/6, the graduation date of the Class of 2006 at Princeton University.


Part V:
"Heil Woodrow!"

As noted above, this title from a book review in today's New York Times refers to Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States (1913-1921) and President of Princeton University (1902-1910).

A suitable heraldic emblem
to accompany the Goldberg Heil:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix07A/071230-Shield.jpg

The Princeton Shield

For another heraldic emblem
related, if only in this journal,
to Princeton, see
Religious Symbolism
at Princeton:

Goldberg might prefer,
for his Heil,
the following variation:

Fahne,
S. H. Cullinane,
Aug. 15, 2003

Dr. Mengele,
according to
Hollywood

Click on the Fahne (flag)
for further details.

Goldberg might also enjoy

An Unsuitable Santa:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070628-Santa.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Santa from Aaron Sorkin's
Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip

Related material:

Taking Christ to Studio 60
 

Wednesday, December 26, 2007

Wednesday December 26, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM
A Wonderful Life

Part I:
 
Language Games

 
on December 19:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix07A/071219-StanLilith.jpg

See also the noir entry on
“Nightmare Alley” for
Winter Solstice 2002,
as well as a solstice-related
commentary on I Ching
Hexagram 41, Decrease.

Part II:

Language Game
on Christmas Day

Pennsylvania Lottery
December 25, 2007:

PA Lottery Christmas Day: Mid-day 041 and 2911, Evening 173 and 0666

Part III:
 
A Wonderful Life

The Pennsylvania Lottery on Christmas at mid-day paired the number of the I Ching Hexagram 41, “Decrease,” with the number 2911, which may be interpreted as a reference to I Chronicles 29:11

“Thine, O LORD is the greatness, and the power, and the glory, and the victory, and the majesty: for all that is in the heaven and in the earth is thine; thine is the kingdom, O LORD, and thou art exalted as head above all.”

This verse is sometimes cited as influencing the Protestant conclusion of the Lord’s Prayer:

“Thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever” (Mt 6.13b; compare 1 Chr 29.11-13)….

This traditional epilogue to the Lord’s prayer protects the petition for the coming of the kingdom from being understood as an exorcism, which we derive from the Jewish prayer, the Kaddish, which belonged at the time to the synagogical liturgy.

World Alliance of Reformed Churches

The Pennsylvania Lottery on Christmas evening paired 173 with the beastly number 0666.  The latter number suggests that perhaps being “understood as an exorcism” might not, in this case, be such a bad thing. What, therefore, might “173” have to do with exorcism?  A search in the context of the phrase “language games” yields a reference to Wittgenstein’s Zettel, section 173:

http://www.log24.com/log/pix07A/071226-Zettel.jpg

From Charles L. Creegan, Wittgenstein and Kierkegaard:

Language-games give general guidelines of the application of language. Wittgenstein suggests that there are innumerably many language-games: innumerably many kinds of use of the components of language.24 The grammar of the language-game influences the possible relations of words, and things, within that game. But the players may modify the rules gradually. Some utterances within a given language-game are applications; others are ‘grammatical remarks’ or definitions of what is or should be possible. (Hence Wittgenstein’s remark, ‘Theology as grammar’25 – the grammar of religion.)

The idea of the ‘form of life’ is a reminder about even more basic phenomena. It is clearly bound up with the idea of language. (Language and ‘form of life’ are explicitly connected in four of the five passages from the Investigations in which the term ‘form of life’ appears.) Just as grammar is subject to change through language-uses, so ‘form of life’ is subject to change through changes in language. (The Copernican revolution is a paradigm case of this.) Nevertheless, ‘form of life’ expresses a deeper level of ‘agreement.’ It is the level of ‘what has to be accepted, the given.’26 This is an agreement prior to agreement in opinions and decisions. Not everything can be doubted or judged at once.

This suggests that ‘form of life’ does not denote static phenomena of fixed scope. Rather, it serves to remind us of the general need for context in our activity of meaning. But the context of our meaning is a constantly changing mosaic involving both broad strokes and fine-grained distinctions.

The more commonly understood point of the ‘Private Language Argument’ – concerning the root of meaning in something public – comes into play here. But it is important to show just what public phenomenon Wittgenstein has in mind. He remarks: ‘Only in the stream of thought and life do words have meaning.’27

24
Investigations, sec. 23.
25
Investigations, sec. 373; compare Zettel, sec. 717.
26
Investigations, p. 226e.

27

Zettel, sec. 173. The thought is expressed many times in similar words.

And from an earlier chapter of Creegan:

The ‘possibility of religion’ manifested itself in considerable reading of religious works, and this in a person who chose his reading matter very carefully. Drury’s recollections include conversations about Thomas à Kempis, Samuel Johnson’s Prayers, Karl Barth, and, many times, the New Testament, which Wittgenstein had clearly read often and thought about.25 Wittgenstein had also thought about what it would mean to be a Christian. Some time during the 1930s, he remarked to Drury: ‘There is a sense in which you and I are both Christians.’26 In this context it is certainly worth noting that he had for a time said the Lord’s Prayer each day.27

Wittgenstein’s last words were: ‘Tell them I’ve had a wonderful life!’28

25
Drury (1981) ‘Conversations with Wittgenstein,’ in Ludwig Wittgenstein: Personal Recollections, pp. 112ff.
26
Drury, ‘Conversations,’ p. 130.
27
Drury, ‘Some notes,’ p. 109.
28
Reported by Mrs. Bevan, the wife of the doctor in whose house Wittgenstein was staying. Malcolm, Memoir, p. 81.

Part IV:
 
L’Envoi

For more on the Christmas evening
number of the beast, see Dec. 3:
  “Santa’s Polar Opposite?” —

Did he who made the Lamb
make thee?

Friday, December 14, 2007

Friday December 14, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM
“Well, it changes.”

Nicole Kidman at a press conference
for the London premiere of
“The Golden Compass” on November 27:

Nicole Kidman'-- kittens and tiger

A related Log24 link from
that same date, November 27:

Deep Beauty

See also Zen and the Art of
Motorcycle Maintenance

“Plato hadn’t tried to destroy areté. He had encapsulated it; made a permanent, fixed Idea out of it; had converted it to a rigid, immobile Immortal Truth. He made areté the Good, the highest form, the highest Idea of all. It was subordinate only to Truth itself, in a synthesis of all that had gone before.That was why the Quality that Phaedrus had arrived at in the classroom had seemed so close to Plato’s Good. Plato’s Good was taken from the rhetoricians. Phaedrus searched, but could find no previous cosmologists who had talked about the Good. That was from the Sophists. The difference was that Plato’s Good was a fixed and eternal and unmoving Idea, whereas for the rhetoricians it was not an Idea at all. The Good was not a form of reality. It was reality itself, ever changing, ultimately unknowable in any kind of fixed, rigid way.”

— as well as Cold Mountain 

Page 48: “It’s claimed that if
you take a mirror and look
backwards into a well, you’ll
see your future down in the water.”

“So in short order Ada found herself bent backward over the mossy well lip, canted in a pose with little to recommend it in the way of dignity or comfort, back arched, hips forward, legs spraddled for balance.  She held a hand mirror above her face, angled to catch the surface of the water below.

Ada had agreed to the well-viewing as a variety of experiment in local custom and as a tonic for her gloom. Her thoughts had been broody and morbid and excessively retrospective for so long that she welcomed the chance to run counter to that flow, to cast forward and think about the future, even though she expected to see nothing but water at the bottom of the well.

She shifted her feet to find better grip on the packed dirt of the yard and then tried to look into the mirror.  The white sky above was skimmed over with backlit haze, bright as a pearl or as a silver mirror itself.  The dark foliage of oaks all around the edges framed the sky, duplicating the wooden frame of the mirror into which Ada peered, examining its picture of the well depths behind her to see what might lie ahead in her life. The bright round of well water at the end of the black shaft was another mirror.  It cast back the shine of sky and was furred around the edges here and there with sprigs of fern growing between stones.

Ada tried to focus her attention on the hand mirror, but the bright sky beyond kept drawing her eye away.  She was dazzled by light and shade, by the confusing duplication of reflections and of frames. All coming from too many directions for the mind to take account of. The various images bounced against each other until she felt a desperate vertigo, as if she could at any moment pitch backward and plunge head first down the well shaft and drown there, the sky far above her, her last vision but a bright circle set in the dark, no bigger than a full moon.

Her head spun and she reached with her free hand and held to the stonework of the well.  And then just for a moment things steadied, and there indeed seemed to be a picture in the mirror.”

— and Log24 on December 3 —

I Ching Hexagram 48: The Well
The above Chinese character
stands for Hexagram 48, “The Well.”
For further details, click on the well.

Monday, August 6, 2007

Monday August 6, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 AM
The Divine Universals

"The tigers of wrath          
 are wiser than                
 the horses of instruction."

— William Blake,
Proverbs of Hell

From Shining Forth:

  The Place of the Lion, by Charles Williams, 1931, Chapter Eight:

"Besides, if this fellow were right, what harm would the Divine Universals do us? I mean, aren't the angels supposed to be rather gentle and helpful and all that?"

"You're doing what Marcellus warned you against… judging them by English pictures. All nightgowns and body and a kind of flacculent sweetness. As in cemeteries, with broken bits of marble. These are Angels– not a bit the same thing. These are the principles of the tiger and the volcano and the flaming suns of space."

 Under the Volcano, Chapter Two:

"But if you look at that sunlight there, then perhaps you'll get the answer, see, look at the way it falls through the window: what beauty can compare to that of a cantina in the early morning? Your volcanoes outside? Your stars– Ras Algethi? Antares raging south southeast? Forgive me, no." 

 A Spanish-English dictionary:

lucero m.
morning or evening star:
any bright star….
hole in a window panel
     for the admission of light….

Look at the way it
falls through the window….

— Malcolm Lowry

How art thou fallen from heaven,
O Lucifer, son of the morning!
— Isaiah 14:12

For more on Spanish
and the evening star,
see Plato, Pegasus, and
the Evening Star.

 Symmetry axes
of the square:

Symmetry axes of the square

(See Damnation Morning.)

From the cover of the
 Martin Cruz Smith novel
Stallion Gate:

Atom on cover of Stallion

"That old Jew
gave me this here."

Dialogue from the
Robert Stone novel
A Flag for Sunrise.

Related material:

A Mass for Lucero,

Log24, Sept. 13, 2006

Mathematics, Religion, Art

— and this morning's online
New York Times obituaries:

Cardinal Lustiger of Paris and jazz pianist Sal Mosca, New York Times obituaries on August 6, 2007

The above image contains summary obituaries for Cardinal Lustiger, Archbishop of Paris, 1981-2005, and for Sal Mosca, jazz pianist and teacher. In memory of the former, see all of the remarks preceding the image above. In memory of the latter, the remarks of a character in Martin Cruz Smith's Stallion Gate on jazz piano may have some relevance:

"I hate arguments. I'm a coward. Arguments are full of words, and each person is sure he's the only one who knows what the words mean. Each word is a basket of eels, as far as I'm concerned. Everybody gets to grab just one eel and that's his interpretation and he'll fight to the death for it…. Which is why I love music. You hit a C and it's a C and that's all it is. Like speaking clearly for the first time. Like being intelligent. Like understanding. A Mozart or an Art Tatum sits at the piano and picks out the undeniable truth."

Wednesday, July 18, 2007

Wednesday July 18, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:03 AM
Burning Bright

“What is real?”
Pope Benedict XVI
in Brazil on May 13

Yesterday in
the Keystone State:

PA Lottery July 17, 2007: Mid-day 853, Evening 856

This suggests– via a search on “853-856” + “universals”– that we consult pages 853-856 in The Library of America’s William James: Writings 1902-1910.

Beginning on page 853 in this book, and ending on page 856, is an excerpt from a James address that the editor has titled…

The Tigers in India

“There are two ways of knowing things, knowing them immediately or intuitively, and knowing them conceptually or representatively.  Altho such things as the white paper before our eyes can be known intuitively, most of the things we know, the tigers now in India, for example, or the scholastic system of philosophy, are known only representatively or symbolically.

Suppose, to fix our ideas, that we take first a case of conceptual knowledge, and let it be our knowledge of the tigers in India, as we sit here.  Exactly what do we mean by saying that we here know the tigers? ….

Most men would answer that what we mean by knowing the tigers is having them, however absent in body, become in some way present to our thought…. At the very least, people would say that what we mean by knowing the tigers is mentally pointing towards them as we sit here….

… The pointing of our thought to the tigers is known simply and solely as a procession of mental associates and motor consequences that follow on the thought, and that would lead harmoniously, if followed out, into some ideal or real context, or even into the immediate presence, of the tigers….

… In all this there is no self-transcendency in our mental images taken by themselves. They are one phenomenal fact; the tigers are another; and their pointing to the tigers is a perfectly commonplace intra-experiential relation, if you once grant a connecting world to be there.  In short, the ideas and the tigers are in themselves as loose and separate, to use Hume’s language, as any two things can be, and pointing means here an operation as external and adventitious as any that nature yields.

I hope you may agree with me now that in representative knowledge there is no special inner mystery, but only an outer chain of physical or mental intermediaries connecting thought and thing. To know an object is here to lead to it through a context which the world supplies….

Let us next pass on to the case of immediate or intuitive acquaintance with an object, and let the object be the white paper before our eyes…. What now do we mean by ‘knowing’ such a sort of object as this?  For this is also the way in which we should know the tiger if our conceptual idea of him were to terminate by having led us to his lair?

… the paper seen and the seeing of it are only two names for one indivisible fact which, properly named, is the datum, the phenomenon, or the experience. The paper is in the mind and the mind is around the paper, because paper and mind are only two names that are given later to the one experience, when, taken in a larger world of which it forms a part, its connections are traced in different directions.1

James, Writings 1902-1910, page 856

The same volume also contains
James’s The Varieties of
Religious Experience.

“The Tigers in India” is
only a part of a 20-page
James address originally titled
The Knowing of Things Together
(my emphasis).

Sunday, October 22, 2006

Sunday October 22, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:01 PM
Go Tigers!

Brooke Shields

On this date:

“In 1746,
Princeton University
in New Jersey received
its charter.”

Today in History
by The Associated Press

“The charter… authorized
the erection of a college….”

Princeton University

Tuesday, March 14, 2006

Tuesday March 14, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM
Fearful Symmetry
and Minkowski Space-Time

(For the tigers of Princeton,
a selection suggested by
the work of Richard Parker
 on Lorentzian lattices)

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060314-Lorentzian.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Sunday, August 7, 2005

Sunday August 7, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:20 AM
Presbyterian Justice

News from today’s New York Times:

The Rev. Dr. Theodore Alexander Gill Sr., a Presbyterian theologian, a philosophy teacher, and an influential provost emeritus of John Jay College of Criminal Justice in Manhattan, died at 85 on June 10 in Princeton.  In retirement from John Jay, The Rev. Dr. Gill was theologian in residence at Nassau Presbyterian Church in Princeton.

In memory of The Rev. Dr. Gill:

Religious Symbolism at Princeton
    (on Nassau Presbyterian Church),
Pro-Semitism
    (on number theory at Princeton),
For the Mad Musicians of Princeton,
     (on Schroeder and Bernstein),
Movie Date and its preceding entries
   (on Princeton’s St. John von Neumann),
Why Me?
   (for Princeton theologian Elaine Pagels),
Notes on Literary and Philosophical Puzzles
   (Princeton’s John Nash as Ya Ya Fontana), and
Go Tigers!
   (for the Princeton Evangelical Fellowship).

For a more conventional memorial, see

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/050807-SFTS-Logo.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

the obituary from

San Francisco Theological Seminary.

Sunday, January 23, 2005

Sunday January 23, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:06 PM

Death and the Spirit,
Part IV

From Tuesday:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050123-Tiger.JPG” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Seriously.

See also

Death and the Spirit, Part I,

Death and the Spirit, Part II, and

Death and the Spirit, Part III.

 

Saturday, January 22, 2005

Saturday January 22, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Go Tigers!

Recommended reading for the
Princeton Evangelical Fellowship (PEF):

Walter Kirn, Lost in the Meritocracy,
Atlantic Monthly Jan.-Feb. 2005

The PEF in action:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050122-PEF.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"Only by the form, the pattern,
Can words or music reach
The stillness."

— T. S. Eliot 

Wednesday, January 19, 2005

Wednesday January 19, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 PM

But seriously…

A follow-up to the previous "tiger" entry (which was about an old but good dirty joke).

I just subscribed to The New York Review of Books online for another year, prompted by my desire to read Roger Shattuck on Rimbaud, a tiger of another sort:

"How did this poetic sensibility come to burn so bright?"

The Shattuck piece is from 1967, the year of The Doors' first album.  (See Sunday's Death and the Spirit, Part II.)

Tuesday, January 18, 2005

Tuesday January 18, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:44 PM
Death and
the Spirit, Part III

In memory of comedian
Gene Baylos, who died
on Jan. 10, 2005:

From the dark jungle
as a tiger bright,
Form from the viewless Spirit
leaps to light.

— Rumi, "Reality and Appearance"

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050118-Tiger2.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 

Related material:

Sunday, January 16, 2005

Sunday January 16, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Death and the
Spirit, Part II

Readings

Are you a lucky little lady
in The City of Light
Or just another lost angel…

City of Night

— Jim Morrison, L.A. Woman

Fourmillante cité,
cité pleine de rêves,
Où le spectre en plein jour
raccroche le passant

— Baudelaire,
Les Fleurs du Mal,
and T. S. Eliot,
Notes to The Waste Land

"When you got the mojo, brother —
when you're on the inside —
the world is fantastic."

— Pablo Tabor in Robert Stone's
A Flag for Sunrise,
Knopf, 1981, p. 428

Now it was Avril's turn to understand and he was frightened out of his wits.

"The Science of Luck," he said cautiously. "You watch, do you?  That takes a lot of self-discipline."

"Of course it does, but it's worth it.  I watch everything, all the time.  I'm one of the lucky ones.  I've got the gift.  I knew it when I was a kid, but I didn't grasp it."  The murmur had intensified.  "This last time, when I was alone so long, I got it right.  I watch for every opportunity and I never do the soft thing.  That's why I succeed."

Avril was silent for a long time.  "It is the fashion," he said at last.  "You've been reading the Frenchmen, I suppose?  Or no, no, perhaps you haven't.  How absurd of me."

"Don't blether."  The voice, stripped of all its disguises, was harsh and naive.  "You always blethered.  You never said anything straight.  What do you know about the Science of Luck?  Go on, tell me.  You're the only one who's understood at all.  Have you ever heard of it before?"

"Not under that name."

"I don't suppose you have.  That's my name for it.  What's its real name?"

"The Pursuit of Death."

— Margery Allingham,
Chapter Seventeen,
"On the Staircase," from
The Tiger in the Smoke

Anagrams

In memory of Danny Sugerman,
late manager of The Doors:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050116-Sugerman.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Danny Sugerman
Photo by
Frank Alan Bella, 2002

"Mr Mojo Risin" = "Jim Morrison."
"Audible Era" = "Baudelaire."
"Bad Rumi" = "Rimbaud."

From the dark jungle
as a tiger bright,
Form from the viewless Spirit
leaps to light.

— Rumi,  "Reality and Appearance,"
translated by R. A. Nicholson

(See also Death and the Spirit
from Twelfth Night, 2005, the date
of Danny Sugerman's death.)

Friday, April 11, 2003

Friday April 11, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:56 PM

Heaven’s Gate

“Rhetoric is concerned with the state of Babel after the Fall.”

— Kenneth Burke, A Rhetoric of Motives, quoted by Douglas Robinson at the site Linguistics and Language

Mesopotamian mathematics:

“Location: present-day Iraq, between the Tigris and Euphrates

Cities: Babylon, founded 2300 BC, 70 miles south of present Baghdad, on the Euphrates….

Babylon = Bab-ilu, “gate of God,” Hebrew: Babel or Bavel.”

Modern rendition
of “Bab-ilu

Kenneth
Burke

Perhaps the real heaven’s gate is at

Pottawatomie College.

Instant karma update:

 At 5:09 PM I read the following in the New York Review of Books, dated May 1, 2003, which arrived today.

From a review of Terror and Liberalism, by Paul Berman:

“As a general analysis of the various enemies of liberalism, and what ties them together, it is superb.  All — Nazis, Islamists, Bolsheviks, Fascists, and so on — are linked by Berman to the ‘ur-myth’ of the fall of Babylon.”

Speaking of Ur, Berman likes to quote a non-Biblical Abraham, named Lincoln.  The first, Biblical, Abraham was a damned homicidal lunatic, and the later American Abraham also delighted in blood sacrifice.  But that’s just my opinion.  For a different view, see the Chautauqua Abrahamic Program.

 

Tuesday, February 25, 2003

Tuesday February 25, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:44 AM

Song of Not-Self

A critic on the abstract expressionists:

"…they painted that reality — that song of self — with a passion, bravura, and decisiveness unequaled in modern art."

Painter Mark Rothko:

"I don't express myself in painting. 
 I express my not-self."

On this day in 1957, Buddy Holly and his group recorded the hit version of "That'll Be the Day."

On this day in 1970, painter Mark Rothko committed suicide in his New York City studio.

On February 27, 1971, the Rothko Chapel was formally dedicated in Houston, Texas.

On May 26, 1971, Don McLean recorded "American Pie."

Rothko was apparently an alcoholic; whether he spent his last day enacting McLean's lyrics I do not know.

Rothko is said to have written that

"The progression of a painter's work, as it travels in time from point to point, will be toward clarity: toward the elimination of all obstacles between the painter and the idea, and between the idea and the observer. As examples of such obstacles, I give (among others) memory, history or geometry, which are swamps of generalization from which one might pull out parodies of ideas (which are ghosts) but never an idea in itself. To achieve this clarity is, inevitably, to be understood."

— Mark Rothko, The Tiger's Eye, 1, no. 9 (October 1949), p. 114

Whether Holly's concept "the day that I die" is a mere parody of an idea or "an idea in itself," the reader may judge.  The reader may also judge the wisdom of building a chapel to illustrate the clarity of thought processes such as Rothko's in 1949.  I personally feel that someone who can call geometry a "swamp" may not be the best guide to religious meditation.

For another view, see this essay by Erik Anderson Reece.

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