Log24

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Tuesday March 25, 2008

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Dancers and
the Dance

The previous entry was inspired (see the "In the Details" link) by the philosophical musings of Julie Taymor… specifically, her recollection of Balinese dancers–

"… they were performing for God. Now God can mean whatever you want it to mean. But for me, I understood it so totally. The detail….

They did it from the inside to the outside. And from the outside to the in. And that profoundly moved me then. It was… it was the most important thing that I ever experienced."

— Julie Taymor,
"Skewed Mirrors" interview

Here is some further commentary on the words of that entry–

On the phrase "Within You Without You"– the title of a song by George Harrison:

"Bernard’s understanding of reality connects to this idea of 'flow': he sees reality as a product of consciousness. He rejects the idea of an 'outer' world of unchanging objects and an 'inner' world of the mind and ideas. Rather, our minds are part of the world, and vice versa."

— Adrien Ardoin, SparkNote on
    Virginia Woolf's The Waves

On "Death and the Apple Tree"– the title of the previous entry— in The Waves:

"The apple tree Neville is looking at as he overhears the servants at the school discussing a local murder becomes inextricably linked to his knowledge of death. Neville finds himself unable to pass the tree, seeing it as glimmering and lovely, yet sinister and 'implacable.' When he learns that Percival is dead, he feels he is face to face once again with 'the tree which I cannot pass.' Eventually, Neville turns away from the natural world to art, which exists outside of time and can therefore transcend death. The fruit of the tree appears only in Neville’s room on his embroidered curtain, a symbol itself of nature turned into artifice. The apple tree image also echoes the apple tree from the Book of Genesis in the Bible, the fruit of which led Adam and Eve to knowledge and, therefore, expulsion from Eden."

— Adrien Ardoin, op. cit.

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