Log24

Sunday, July 24, 2016

Point Omega

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:00 AM

Continues .

In this post, "Omega" denotes a generic 4-element set.

For instance Cullinane's 

Logo for 'Elements of Finite Geometry'

or Schmeikal's 

 .

The mathematics appropriate for describing
group actions on such a set is not Schmeikal's
Clifford algebra, but rather Galois's finite fields.

Thursday, January 7, 2016

Point Omega

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:32 AM

Continues. See previous episodes.

See as well

The above image is from April 7, 2003.

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Point Omega*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Fareed Zakaria in an online Aug. 21
New York Times  book review

" Most intellectuals think ideas matter.
In one of his most famous and oft-­quoted lines,
John Maynard Keynes declared, 'Practical men
who believe themselves to be quite exempt from
any intellectual influence are usually the slaves
of some defunct economist. Madmen in authority,
who hear voices in the air, are distilling their frenzy
from some academic scribbler of a few years back.'

Scott L. Montgomery and Daniel Chirot concur,
arguing that ideas 'do not merely matter; they matter
immensely, as they have been the source for decisions
and actions that have structured the modern world.' 
In The Shape of the New: Four Big Ideas and How
They Made the Modern World 
, Montgomery and
Chirot make the case for the importance of four
­powerful ideas, rooted in the European Enlightenment,
that have created the world as we know it.
'Invading armies can be resisted,' they quote
Victor Hugo. 'Invading ideas cannot be.' "

* Related material: Point Omega , a book
   by Don DeLillo, in this journal.

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Point Omega

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

IMAGE- Chair from 'Osterman Weekend' ending

“Am I still on?” — Ending line of  The Osterman Weekend  (1983)

Sunday, January 18, 2015

Point Omega Echo

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 AM

"… as though echoing the road's vanishing point
up ahead…." — Album review, 2002

See Vanishing Point in this journal.

See as well Rolling Stone  four days ago
on Stevie Nicks in 1976:

Keep in mind, the audience has
no idea who Stevie Nicks is.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Point Omega

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:07 PM

Continues

Update of 9:29 PM ET (Click to enlarge.) —

Adapted from a Facebook page.

Friday, July 16, 2010

Point Omega continued

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:26 PM

"We tried to create new realities overnight…."
Point Omega, quoted here in the post
Devising Entities (July 3, 2010)

Image-- NY Lottery, evening  July 15=000, midday July 16=911

See also last night's Meditation as well as the earlier posts
Language Game and The Subject Par Excellence.

Sunday, July 28, 2019

Review

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:18 AM

From a news article featured on the American Mathematical Society
home page today

A joint Vietnam-USA mathematical meeting in Vietnam on
June 10-13, 2019:

This  journal on June 12, 2019:

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

The Osterman Haiku

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:32 PM Edit This

Click on the book cover below for posts tagged "Haiku."

'Point Omega' by DeLillo

See also the Twentieth of May, 2008 —

Welcome to the Garden Club, Pilgrim.

Wednesday, July 3, 2019

“From Here to Infinity”

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:59 AM

The above title is that of a facetious British essay linked to in the previous post.
It suggests a review . . .

". . . some point in a high corner of the room . . . ."

      Point Omega

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

The Osterman Haiku

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:32 PM

Click on the book cover below for posts tagged "Haiku."

IMAGE- 'Point Omega' by DeLillo

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Old Guy with a Cane

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:10 AM

From yesterday's post Misère Play —

See as well New York Times  book review of the novel Point Omega .
(The Times 's "Wrinkle in Time" is the title of the review, not of the novel.)

Related material suggested by the publication date — March 27, 2014
of a novel titled Zero Sum Game  —

Friday, April 5, 2019

April 1 Omega

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:58 PM

IMAGE- 'Point Omega' by DeLillo


 

From posts tagged Number Art

'Knight' octad labeling by the 8 points of the projective line over GF(7)    
 

From the novel Point Omega

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110320-OmegaHaiku.jpg
 

Related material for
Mathematics Awareness Month

Also on 07/18/2015

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

Desert Notes*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:13 AM

A November 1 LA Times  article about a book to be published today —

Why did Jonathan Lethem
turn toward the desert
in 'The Feral Detective'?

See also searches in this  journal for Desert and, more particularly,
Point Omega and Mojave.

* The title of a book by Barry Holstun Lopez.

Friday, July 7, 2017

Psycho History

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:00 PM

The title was suggested by the term "psychohistory" in
the Foundation  novels of Isaac Asimov. See the previous post.

See also a 2010 New York Times  review of
DeLillo's novel Point Omega . The review is titled,
without any other reference to L'Engle's classic tale
of the same name, "A Wrinkle in Time."

IMAGE- NY Times headline 'A Wrinkle in Time' with 24 Hour Psycho and Point Omega scene

Related material: The Crosswicks Curse.

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Product

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:45 PM

"Human perception is a saga of created reality."

— Don DeLillo, Point Omega

See "Important Product" in this journal and the previous post.

Friday, September 11, 2015

Omega Wrinkle:

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:42 PM

A Phrase That Haunts

From this journal on August 23, 2013

Illustration from New York Times  review 
of the novel Point Omega —

IMAGE- NY Times headline 'A Wrinkle in Time' with 24 Hour Psycho and Point Omega scene

From the print version of The New York Times Sunday Book Review
dated Sept. 13, 2015 —

The online version, dated Sept. 11, 2015 —

From the conclusion of the online version —

On the above print  headline, "Wrinkles in Time,"
that vanished in the online version —

"Now you see it, now you don't"
is not a motto one likes to see demonstrated
by a reputable news firm.

Related material:  Jews Telling Stories.

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Haiku for DeLillo*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:23 PM

A music video that opens with remarks by Lawrence Ferlinghetti
at the Last Waltz concert (Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 25, 1976):

"Our Father, whose art's in heaven…" —

For other religious remarks from the above upload date,
Sept. 9, 2011, see Holy Field GF(3).

Click the above "ripple" image for a Grateful Dead haiku
quoted here on Sunday, July 5, 2015.

For another meditation from the second upload date above,
March 19, 2012, see some thoughts on the word "field."

IMAGE- Japanese character for 'field'

* For the title, see an excerpt from Point Omega .

Friday, February 27, 2015

Stranger than Dreams

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:48 AM

For a former president of Notre Dame
who reportedly died at 11:30 PM last night —

"Sometimes a wind comes before the rain
and sends birds sailing past the window,
spirit birds that ride the night,
stranger than dreams."

— The end of DeLillo's Point Omega

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Song for a Night Bird

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:15 PM

"Sometimes a wind comes before the rain
and sends birds sailing past the window,
spirit birds that ride the night,
stranger than dreams."

— The end of DeLillo's Point Omega

Monday, January 12, 2015

Points Omega*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The previous post displayed a set of
24 unit-square "points" within a rectangular array.
These are the points of the 
Miracle Octad Generator  of R. T. Curtis.

The array was labeled  Ω
because that is the usual designation for
a set acted upon by a group:

* The title is an allusion to Point Omega , a novel by
   Don DeLillo published on Groundhog Day 2010.
   See "Point Omega" in this journal.

Monday, November 24, 2014

“What Reality?”

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 PM

Creating new realities in DeLillo's 'Point Omega'

"We tried to create new realities overnight,
careful sets of words that resemble advertising slogans
in memorability and repeatability."

Our Most Important Product

 

"Omega is as real  as we need it to be."

— Burt Lancaster in Sam Peckinpah's last film

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Tonic

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:00 PM

Related posts:
New Key and The Well-Tempered Monolith.

Hold the gin.

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Flashback…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:01 AM

To Feb. 11, 2012:

“News and Traffic. Sports and Weather. These were his acid terms
for the life he’d left behind, more than two years of living with
the tight minds that made the war. It was all background noise,
he said, waving a hand. He liked to wave a hand in dismissal.”

— DeLillo, Don (2010-02-02), Point Omega 

Send in the Clowns.   (Click to enlarge.)

The above flashback was suggested by Lev Grossman’s verb “trafficked”
in yesterday’s posts, and by the song lyric “show us the way to
the next little girl.”

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Stranger than Dreams*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Illustration from a discussion of a symplectic structure 
in a 4×4 array quoted here on January 17, 2014 —

See symplectic structure in this journal.

* The final words of Point Omega , a 2010 novel by Don DeLillo.
See also Omega Matrix in this journal.

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

24 Hour Psycho…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:07 PM

Continues.

"24 Hour Psycho" at the Museum of Modern Art in the novel
Point Omega  is illustrated in New York Times  review

IMAGE- NY Times headline 'A Wrinkle in Time' with 24 Hour Psycho and Point Omega scene

Related material — Today's 1 PM post and 

IMAGE- From a Lawrence Block mystery 'A Stab in the Dark'- 'There was a problem in long division worked out in yellow chalk on the blackboard.'

See also yesterday's  1 PM post.

Saturday, August 24, 2013

Cast (continued)

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:31 AM

The death yesterday of British cinematographer
Gilbert Taylor suggests an image from last evening's
Log24 search Point Omega —

.

The die in the above image (shown here Dec. 28, 2012
displays the numbers 3-6-5 in counterclockwise order.
A similar die in an earlier post served as a metaphor for
a time-jump to 365 days in the past.

For some religious remarks by Umberto Eco that may
serve as a small memorial to Taylor, see this journal 
a year before  the day he died— August 23, 2012.

"Everybody comes to Rick's."

Friday, August 23, 2013

Vacant Space

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

A passage from Wallace Stevens

The spirit and space,
The empty spirit 
In vacant space.

A frame from the film American Psycho  (2000), starring Christian Bale—

IMAGE- 'espace' sign from the film 'American Psycho'

The rest of the film is not recommended.

Related material—

"24 Hour Psycho" at the Museum of Modern Art in the novel Point Omega .

Illustration from a New York Times  review

IMAGE- NY Times headline 'A Wrinkle in Time' with 24 Hour Psycho and Point Omega scene

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Caution: Slow Art

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

"Of course, DeLillo being DeLillo,
it’s the deeper implications of the piece —
what it reveals about the nature of
film, perception and time — that detain him."

— Geoff Dyer, review of Point Omega

Related material:

A phrase of critic Robert Hughes,
"slow art," in this journal.

A search for that phrase yields the following
figure from a post on DeLillo of Oct. 12, 2011:

The 3x3 square

The above 3×3 grid is embedded in a 
somewhat more sophisticated example
of conceptual art from April 1, 2013:

IMAGE- A Galois-geometry key to Desargues' theorem

Update of April 12, 2013

The above key uses labels from the frontispiece
to Baker's 1922 Principles of Geometry, Vol. I ,
that shows a three-triangle version of Desargues's theorem.

A different figure, from a site at National Tsing Hua University,
shows the three triangles of Baker's figure more clearly:

IMAGE- Desargues' theorem with three triangles (the large Desargues configuration) and Galois-geometry version

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Kountry Korn Kandy

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM

For the first two words of the title, 
see the previous post.

For the third word, see a review of the recent film "Hitchcock"
about the director and Janet Leigh during the filming of "Psycho"—

Hopkins' Hitchcock more or less eats out of Janet's hand
when she feeds him candy corn during a drive together
(the reference is to the candy Norman Bates is devouring
when he's interviewed by Martin Balsam's detective).

A story that demands the blended talents of Hitchcock and of
Mel Brooks to do it justice:

See also a 2010 New York Times  review of
DeLillo's novel Point Omega . The review is titled,
without any other reference to L'Engle's classic tale
of the same name, "A Wrinkle in Time."

IMAGE- NY Times headline 'A Wrinkle in Time' with 24 Hour Psycho and Point Omega scene

Related material: The Crosswicks Curse.

Friday, December 28, 2012

Cube Koan

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 4:56 AM
 

From Don DeLillo's novel Point Omega —

I knew what he was, or what he was supposed to be, a defense intellectual, without the usual credentials, and when I used the term it made him tense his jaw with a proud longing for the early weeks and months, before he began to understand that he was occupying an empty seat. "There were times when no map existed to match the reality we were trying to create."

"What reality?"

"This is something we do with every eyeblink. Human perception is a saga of created reality. But we were devising entities beyond the agreed-upon limits of recognition or interpretation. Lying is necessary. The state has to lie. There is no lie in war or in preparation for war that can't be defended. We went beyond this. We tried to create new realities overnight, careful sets of words that resemble advertising slogans in memorability and repeatability. These were words that would yield pictures eventually and then become three-dimensional. The reality stands, it walks, it squats. Except when it doesn't."

He didn't smoke but his voice had a sandlike texture, maybe just raspy with age, sometimes slipping inward, becoming nearly inaudible. We sat for some time. He was slouched in the middle of the sofa, looking off toward some point in a high corner of the room. He had scotch and water in a coffee mug secured to his midsection. Finally he said, "Haiku."

I nodded thoughtfully, idiotically, a slow series of gestures meant to indicate that I understood completely.

"Haiku means nothing beyond what it is. A pond in summer, a leaf in the wind. It's human consciousness located in nature. It's the answer to everything in a set number of lines, a prescribed syllable count. I wanted a haiku war," he said. "I wanted a war in three lines. This was not a matter of force levels or logistics. What I wanted was a set of ideas linked to transient things. This is the soul of haiku. Bare everything to plain sight. See what's there. Things in war are transient. See what's there and then be prepared to watch it disappear."

What's there—

This view of a die's faces 3, 6, and 5, in counter-
clockwise order (see previous post) suggests a way
of labeling the eight corners  of a die (or cube):

123, 135, 142, 154, 246, 263, 365, 456.

Here opposite faces of the die sum to 7, and the
three faces meeting at each corner are listed
in counter-clockwise order. (This corresponds
to a labeling of one of MacMahon's* 30 colored cubes.)
A similar vertex-labeling may be used in describing 
the automorphisms of the order-8 quaternion group.

For a more literary approach to quaternions, see
Pynchon's novel Against the Day .

* From Peter J. Cameron's weblog:

  "The big name associated with this is Major MacMahon,
   an associate of Hardy, Littlewood and Ramanujan,
   of whom Robert Kanigel said,

His expertise lay in combinatorics, a sort of
glorified dice-throwing, and in it he had made
contributions original enough to be named
a Fellow of the Royal Society.

   Glorified dice-throwing, indeed…"

Sunday, September 23, 2012

Plan 9 (continued)–

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

In Like Flynn

From the Wall Street Journal  site Friday evening—

ESSAY September 21, 2012, 9:10 p.m. ET

Are We Really Getting Smarter?

Americans' IQ scores have risen steadily over the past century.
James R. Flynn examines why.

IMAGE- Raven's Progressive Matrices problem with ninth configuration a four-diamonds grid

No, thank you. I prefer the ninth configuration as is—

IMAGE- Four-diamonds grid, the ninth configuration in a Raven's Progressive Matrices problem

Why? See Josefine Lyche's art installation "Grids, you say?"

Her reference there to "High White Noon" is perhaps
related to the use of that phrase in this journal.

The phrase is from a 2010 novel by Don DeLillo.
See "Point Omega," as well as Lyche's "Omega Point,"
in this journal.

The Wall Street Journal  author above, James R. Flynn (born in 1934)
"is famous for his discovery of the Flynn effect, the continued
year-after-year increase of IQ scores in all parts of the world."
 —Wikipedia

His son Eugene Victor Flynn is a mathematician, co-author
of the following chapter on the Kummer surface— 

For use of the Kummer surface in Buddhist metaphysics, see last night's
post "Occupy Space (continued)" and the letters of Nanavira Thera from the 
late 1950s at nanavira.blogspot.com.

These letters, together with Lyche's use of the phrase "high white noon,"
suggest a further quotation

You know that it would be untrue
You know that I would be a liar
If I was to say to you
Girl, we couldn't get much higher

See also the Kummer surface at the web page Configurations and Squares.

Saturday, September 1, 2012

College of the Desert

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:08 AM

(Continued from 6:08 AM EDT yesterday and the day before)

"Richard Elster was seventy-three, I was less than half his age. He’d invited me to join him here, old house, under-furnished, somewhere south of nowhere in the Sonoran Desert or maybe it was the Mojave Desert or another desert altogether.* Not a long visit, he’d said."

— Don DeLillo, Point Omega

IMAGE- Detail of John Ritter's NY Times illustration for Geoff Dyer's review of 'Point Omega,' plus link to Twitter beneath illustration

Maybe it was the desert near Twentynine Palms.

IMAGE- Twentynine Palms in Geoff Dyer's review of 'Point Omega'

"Sometimes a wind comes before the rain
and sends birds sailing past the window,
spirit birds that ride the night,
stranger than dreams."

— Ending of Point Omega

* Update of Sept. 2, 2012— A different passage yields a more precise location.

Friday, August 31, 2012

Translation

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:08 AM

"Translation in the direction
conceptual -> concrete and symbolic
is much easier than
translation in the reverse direction…."

The late William P. Thurston

(See also "Atlas to the Text," Harvard Crimson , March 8, 2011).

Related cinematic imagery

Conceptual  (thanks to Don DeLillo and The New York Times )—

IMAGE- NY Times headline 'A Wrinkle in Time' with 24 Hour Psycho and Point Omega scene

Concrete and symbolic (thanks to Amy Adams and Emily Blunt, as well as
Frederick Seidel in the September 3, 2012, New Yorker )

"Biddies still cleaned the student rooms."

IMAGE- Shower wall in 'Sunshine Cleaning'

Sunday, February 12, 2012

Rhetorical Answer

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 AM

NOW ENJOY BRILLIANT COLLEGE COURSES
IN YOUR HOME OR CAR!

The sun was burning down….

There was a trembling in the air as the unnamed colors
and landforms took on definition, a clarity of outline and extent….

This is where we sat through his hushed hour, a torchlit sky,
the closeness of hills barely visible at high white noon.

— DeLillo, Don, Point Omega 

Midi là-haut, Midi sans mouvement 
En soi se pense et convient à soi-même… 
Tête complète et parfait diadème, 
Je suis en toi le secret changement.

— Valéry, Paul,  "Le Cimetière Marin"

… Todo lo sé por el lucero puro
que brilla en la diadema de la Muerte.

— Darío, Rubén, "Los Tres Reyes Magos"

Saturday, February 11, 2012

Sports

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:24 PM

"News and Traffic. Sports and Weather. These were his acid terms
for the life he’d left behind, more than two years of living with
the tight minds that made the war. It was all background noise,
he said, waving a hand. He liked to wave a hand in dismissal."

— DeLillo, Don (2010-02-02), Point Omega 

Send in the Clowns.   (Click to enlarge.)

Grids

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:17 PM

See Notes for a Haiku.

Related material—

A novel published on Groundhog Day, 2010—

IMAGE- 'Point Omega' by DeLillo

— as well as Conceptual Art, Josefine Lyche's
"Grids, You Say?" and The Speed of Thought.

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

High White Noon

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Grid from a post linked to in yesterday's 24 Hour DeLillo

The 3x3 square

A Study in Art Education

For an example of this grid as slow art , consider the following—

"One can show that the binary tetrahedral group
is isomorphic to the special linear group SL(2,3)—
the group of all 2×2 matrices over the finite field F3
with unit determinant." —Wikipedia

As John Baez has noted, these two groups have the same structure as the geometric 24-cell.

For the connection of the grid to the groups and the 24-cell, see Visualizing GL(2,p).

Related material—

The 3×3 grid has been called a symbol of Apollo (Greek god of reason and of the sun).

"This is where we sat through his hushed hour,
a torchlit sky, the closeness of hills barely visible
at high white noon." — Don DeLillo, Point Omega

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

24 Hour DeLillo

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Review of DeLillo's novel Point Omega

"One difference between art and entertainment has to do with the speed of perception. Art deliberately slows and complicates reading, hearing, and/or viewing so that you’re challenged to re-think and re-feel form and experience. Entertainment deliberately accelerates and simplifies them so that you don’t have to think about or feel very much of anything at all except, perhaps, the adrenalin rush before dazzling spectacle. Although, of course, there can be myriad gradations between the former and latter, in their starkest articulation we’re talking about the distance between, say, David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest  and Dan Brown’s The Lost Symbol…."

— Lance Olsen, March 1, 2010, in The Quarterly Conversation

Robert Hughes on fast and slow art—

"We have had a gutful of fast art and fast food. What we need more of is slow art: art that holds time as a vase holds water: art that grows out of modes of perception and whose skill and doggedness make you think and feel; art that isn't merely sensational, that doesn't get its message across in 10 seconds, that isn't falsely iconic, that hooks onto something deep-running in our natures. In a word, art that is the very opposite of mass media. For no spiritually authentic art can beat mass media at their own game."

– Speech of June 1, 2004

Log24 on art speeds—

A Study in Art Education (June 15, 2007)

Twenty-four (March 13, 2011)

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Haiku

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM

"a sort of… Dr. Strangelove" —Review of Point Omega

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110320-StrangeloveScott.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110320-OmegaHaiku.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110320-TempleBellHaiku.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110313-BellOnGauss.jpg

Context— From March 13— The Counter and Twenty-Four.

Sunday, March 13, 2011

Twenty-Four

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:59 PM

"Poetry never left me stranded, and as an atheist most of my life, I presumed its mojo was a highbrow, intellectual version of what religion did for those more gullible believers in my midst— dumb bunnies to a one, the faithful seemed to me, till I became one.

In the Texas oil town where I grew up, fierceness won fights, but I was thin-skinned— an unfashionably bookish kid whose brain wattage was sapped by a consuming inner life others didn’t seem to bear the burden of. I just seemed to have more frames per second than other kids."

— "Facing Altars: Poetry and Prayer," by Mary Karr

"The original movie had been slowed to a running time of twenty-four hours.
What he was watching seemed pure film, pure time.
The broad horror of the old gothic movie was subsumed in time."

Point Omega , by Don DeLillo

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Time Frames

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:00 PM

From this evening's online New York Times

Flock Around ‘The Clock’

By RANDY KENNEDY

“The Clock,” a video work by Christian Marclay, uses thousands of film and television clips of timepieces to create, minute by minute, a 24-hour montage that unfolds in real time.

Benjamin Norman for The New York Times

“The Clock,” a video work by Christian Marclay, uses thousands of film and television clips of timepieces to create, minute by minute, a 24-hour montage that unfolds in real time.

“The Clock,” a 24-hour video work by Christian Marclay, draws crowds at the Paula Cooper Gallery in Chelsea.

Critic’s Notebook

The Musical Rhythms in Images Out of Time

By BEN RATLIFF

Time is a kind of music, music is a kind of time, and Christian Marclay seems to understand this implicitly.

See also Don DeLillo's Point Omega , a novel published on Groundhog Day, 2010.

Friday, July 16, 2010

Language Game continued…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:30 PM

In the Details

This afternoon's post, Point Omega continued, concerned the New York Lottery numbers for yesterday evening and midday today.

A footnote to that post—

Today's evening New York Lottery number was 664.

In the spirit of the theological content of this afternoon's post—

Today's evening NY number 664 may or may not refer to the year of the Synod of Whitby.

That Synod was about reconciling the customs of Rome with the customs of Iona.

A somewhat relevant link from the Language Game post referred to in this afternoon's post was on the word "selving." This link, now broken, referred to a paper hosted by, as it happens, Iona College. The following is a link to a cached copy of that paper—

"The Story of the Self: The Self of the Story," by James E. Giles (Religion and Intellectual Life, Fall 1986— Volume 4, Number 1, pages 105-112)

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Brightness at Noon, continued

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

"What exactly was Point Omega?"

This is Robert Wright in Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny.

Wright is discussing not the novel Point Omega  by Don DeLillo,
but rather a (related) concept of  the Jesuit philosopher Pierre Teilhard de Chardin.

My own idiosyncratic version of a personal "point omega"—

Image- Josefine Lyche work (with 1986 figures by Cullinane) in a 2009 exhibition in Oslo

Click for further details.

The circular sculpture in the foreground
is called by the artist "The Omega Point."
This has been described as
"a portal that leads in or out of time and space."

For some other sorts of points, see the drawings
on the wall and Geometry Simplified

Image-- The trivial two-point affine space and the trivial one-point projective space, visualized

The two points of the trivial affine space are represented by squares,
and the one point of the trivial projective space is represented by
a line segment separating the affine-space squares.

For related darkness  at noon, see Derrida on différance
as a version of Plato's khôra

(Click to enlarge.)

Image-- Fordham University Press on Derrida, differance, and khora

The above excerpts are from a work on and by Derrida
published in 1997 by Fordham University,
a Jesuit institutionDeconstruction in a Nutshell

Image-- A Catholic view of Derrida

For an alternative to the Villanova view of Derrida,
see Angels in the Architecture.

Saturday, July 3, 2010

Beyond the Limits

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:29 PM

"Human perception is a saga of created reality. But we were devising entities beyond the agreed-upon limits of recognition or interpretation…."

– Don DeLillo, Point Omega

Capitalized, the letter omega figures in the theology of two Jesuits, Teilhard de Chardin and Gerard Manley Hopkins. For the former, see a review of DeLillo. For the latter, see James Finn Cotter's Inscape  and "Hopkins and Augustine."

The lower-case omega is found in the standard symbolic representation of the Galois field GF(4)—

GF(4) = {0, 1, ω, ω2}

A representation of GF(4) that goes beyond the standard representation—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100703-Elements.gif

Here the four diagonally-divided two-color squares represent the four elements of GF(4).

The graphic properties of these design elements are closely related to the algebraic properties of GF(4).

This is demonstrated by a decomposition theorem used in the proof of the diamond theorem.

To what extent these theorems are part of "a saga of created reality" may be debated.

I prefer the Platonist's "discovered, not created" side of the debate.

Devising Entities

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

or, Darkness and Brightness at Noon

"Human perception is a saga of created reality. But we were devising entities beyond the agreed-upon limits of recognition or interpretation…. We tried to create new realities overnight, careful sets of words that resemble advertising slogans in memorability and repeatability. These were words that would yield pictures eventually and then become three-dimensional."

— Don DeLillo, Point Omega

GF(4) = {0, 1, ω, ω2}

Symbolic representation of a Galois field

"One two three  four,
  who are we  for?"

— Cheerleaders' chant

Saturday, February 6, 2010

Conceptual Art

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 AM

The Plane of Time

From tomorrow's NY Times Book Review, Geoff Dyer's review of DeLillo's new novel Point Omega is now online

"The book begins and ends with Douglas Gordon’s film project '24 Hour Psycho' (installed at the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan in 2006), in which the 109-­minute Hitchcock original is slowed so that it takes a full day and night to twitch by. DeLillo conveys with haunting lucidity the uncanny beauty of 'the actor’s eyes in slow transit across his bony sockets,' 'Janet Leigh in the detailed process of not knowing what is about to happen to her.' Of course, DeLillo being DeLillo, it’s the deeper implications of the piece— what it reveals about the nature of film, perception and time— that detain him. As an unidentified spectator, DeLillo is mesmerized by the 'radically altered plane of time': 'The less there was to see, the harder he looked, the more he saw.'

This prologue and epilogue make up a phenomenological essay on one of the rare artworks of recent times to merit the prefix 'conceptual.'"

Related material:

Steering a Space-Plane
(February 2, 2003)

Holly Day
(February 3, 2010)

Attitude Adjustment
(February 3, 2010)

Stephen Savage illustration for 2/2/03 NYT review of 'A Box of Matches'

Cover illustration by Stephen Savage,
NY Times Book Review,
Feb. 2 (Candlemas), 2003

“We live the time that a match flickers.”

– Robert Louis Stevenson, Aes Triplex

Monday, February 1, 2010

Frame by Frame

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:26 PM

From "Time's Breakdown," September 17, 2003

“… even if we can break down time into component Walsh functions, what would it achieve?”

– The Professor, in “Passing in Silence,” by Oliver Humpage

“Being is not a steady state but an occulting one: we are all of us a succession of stillness blurring into motion on the wheel of action, and it is in those spaces of black between the pictures that we find the heart of mystery in which we are never allowed to rest. The flickering of a film interrupts the intolerable continuity of apparent world; subliminally it gives us those in-between spaces of black that we crave.”

Gösta Kraken, Perception Perceived: an Unfinished Memoir (p. 9 in Fremder, a novel by Russell Hoban)

This flashback was suggested by

  1. A review in next Sunday's New York Times Book Review of a new novel, Point Omega, by Don DeLillo. The review's title (for which the reviewer, Geoff Dyer, should not be blamed) is "A Wrinkle in Time." The review and the book are indeed concerned with time, but the only apparent connection to the 1962 novel of Madeleine L'Engle also titled A Wrinkle in Time is rather indirect– via the Walsh functions mentioned above.
  2. A phrase in the Times's review, "frame by frame," also appeared in this jounal on Saturday. It formed part of the title of a current exhibition at Harvard's Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts.
  3. The Carpenter Center exhibition will have an opening reception on February 4.
  4. February 4 is also the birthday of the above Russell Hoban, who will turn 85. See a British web page devoted to that event.

DeLillo is a major novelist, but the work of Hoban seems more relevant to the phrase "frame by frame."

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