Log24

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

Schoolgirl Space: 1984 Revisited

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:24 PM

Cube Bricks 1984

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168

From "Tomorrowland" (2015) —

From John Baez (2018) —

See also this morning's post Perception of Space 
and yesterday's Exploring Schoolgirl Space.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Summer of 1984

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:11 AM

The previous two posts dealt, rather indirectly, with
the notion of "cube bricks" (Cullinane, 1984) —

Group actions on partitions —

Cube Bricks 1984

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168

Another mathematical remark from 1984

For further details, see Triangles Are Square.

Saturday, January 14, 2017

1984: A Space Odyssey

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:40 PM

See Eightfold 1984 in this journal.

Related material —

"… the object sets up a kind of
 frame or space or field
 within which there can be epiphany."

"… Instead of an epiphany of being,
we have something like
an epiphany of interspaces."

— Charles Taylor, "Epiphanies of Modernism,"
Chapter 24 of Sources of the Self ,
Cambridge University Press, 1989

"Perhaps every science must start with metaphor
and end with algebra; and perhaps without the metaphor
there would never have been any algebra."

— Max Black, Models and Metaphors ,
Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY, 1962

Epiphany 2017 —

Click to enlarge:

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Paris Review

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:33 AM

"The loveliness of Paris seems somehow sadly gay." — Song lyric

Stewart also starred in "Equals" (2016). From a synopsis —

"Stewart plays Nia, a writer who works at a company that extols
the virtues of space exploration in a post-apocalyptic society.
She falls in love with the film's main character, Silas (Nicholas Hoult),
an illustrator . . . ."

Space art in The Paris Review

For a different sort of space exploration, see Eightfold 1984.

Monday, October 7, 2019

Berlekamp Garden vs. Kinder Garten

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 PM

Stevens's Omega and Alpha (see previous post) suggest a review.

Omega — The Berlekamp Garden.  See Misère Play (April 8, 2019).
Alpha  —  The Kinder Garten.  See Eighfold Cube.

Illustrations —

The sculpture above illustrates Klein's order-168 simple group.
So does the sculpture below.

Froebel's Third Gift: A cube made up of eight subcubes  

Cube Bricks 1984

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168

Thursday, June 13, 2019

The Reality Blocks

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:24 PM

The new Log24 tag "Eightfold Metaphysics" used in the previous post
suggests a review of posts that were tagged "The Reality Blocks" on May 24.

Then there is, of course, the May 24 death of Murray Gell-Mann, who
hijacked from Buddhism the phrase "eightfold way."

See Gell-Mann in this journal and May 24, 2003.

Seeing the Seing

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 2:30 PM

The phrase "experimental metaphysics" appeared in Peter Woit's weblog on June 11.
Google reveals that . . .

" 'experimental metaphysics' is a term coined by Abner Shimony …."

Shimony reportedly died on August 8, 2015.  Also on that date —

Saturday, August 25, 2018

“Waugh, Orwell. Orwell, Waugh.”

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Suggested by a review of Curl on Modernism —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180825-Ballard-on-Modernism.gif

Related material —

Waugh + Orwell in this journal and

Cube Bricks 1984

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168

Monday, June 4, 2018

The Trinity Stone Defined

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 8:56 PM

"Unsheathe your dagger definitions." — James Joyce, Ulysses

The "triple cross" link in the previous post referenced the eightfold cube
as a structure that might be called the trinity stone .

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168

Some small Galois spaces (the Cullinane models)

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Cube Space Continued

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 4:44 AM

James Propp in the current Math Horizons  on the eightfold cube

James Propp on the eightfold cube

For another puerile approach to the eightfold cube,
see Cube Space, 1984-2003 (Oct. 24, 2008).

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Think Different

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 PM

The New York Times  online this evening

"Mr. Jobs, who died in 2011, loomed over Tuesday’s
nostalgic presentation. The Apple C.E.O., Tim Cook,
paid tribute, his voice cracking with emotion, Mr. Jobs’s
steeple-fingered image looming as big onstage as
Big Brother’s face in the classic Macintosh '1984' commercial."

James Poniewozik 

Review —

Thursday, September 1, 2011

How It Works

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags:  — m759 @ 11:00 AM 

"Design is how it works." — Steven Jobs (See Symmetry and Design.)

"By far the most important structure in design theory is the Steiner system S(5, 8, 24)."
 — "Block Designs," by Andries E. Brouwer

. . . .

See also 1984 Bricks in this journal.

Chin Music

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:45 PM

Related image suggested by "A Line for Frank" (Sept. 30, 2013) —

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Epic

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Continuing the previous post's theme  

Group actions on partitions

Cube Bricks 1984

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168

Related material — Posts now tagged Device Narratives.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Three Things at Once

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:28 PM

Rosalind Krauss in 1979

Nanavira Thera in 1959

Cambridge University Press in 1999 —

See also Cube Bricks.

Sunday, November 27, 2016

A Machine That Will Fit

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:00 AM

Or:  Notes for the Metaphysical Club

Northrop Frye on Wallace Stevens:

"He… stands in contrast to the the dualistic
approach of Eliot, who so often speaks of poetry
as though it were an emotional and sensational
soul looking for a 'correlative' skeleton of
thought to be provided by a philosopher, a
Cartesian ghost trying to find a machine that
will fit."

Ralph Waldo Emerson on "vacant and vain" knowledge:

"The new position of the advancing man has all
the powers of the old, yet has them all new. It
carries in its bosom all the energies of the past,
yet is itself an exhalation of the morning. I cast
away in this new moment all my once hoarded
knowledge, as vacant and vain." 

Harold Bloom on Emerson:

"Emerson may not have invented the American
Sublime, yet he took eternal possession of it." 

Wallace Stevens on the American Sublime:

"And the sublime comes down
To the spirit itself,

The spirit and space,
The empty spirit
In vacant space."

A founding member of the Metaphysical Club:

See also the eightfold cube.

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Triple Cross

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 1:30 PM

(Continued See the title in this journal, as well as Cube Bricks.)

Cube Bricks 1984

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168
Related material —

Dirac and Geometry in this journal,
Kummer's Quartic Surface in this journal,
Nanavira Thera in this journal, and
The Razor's Edge  and Nanavira Thera.

See as well Bill Murray's 1984 film "The Razor's Edge"

Movie poster from 1984

"A thin line separates
love from hate,
success from failure,
life from death."

Three other dualities, from Nanavira Thera in 1959 —

"I find that there are, in every situation,
three independent dualities…."

(Click to enlarge.)

Monday, April 4, 2016

Cube for Berlin

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Foreword by Sir Michael Atiyah —

"Poincaré said that science is no more a collection of facts
than a house is a collection of bricks. The facts have to be
ordered or structured, they have to fit a theory, a construct
(often mathematical) in the human mind. . . . 

 Mathematics may be art, but to the general public it is
a black art, more akin to magic and mystery. This presents
a constant challenge to the mathematical community: to
explain how art fits into our subject and what we mean by beauty.

In attempting to bridge this divide I have always found that
architecture is the best of the arts to compare with mathematics.
The analogy between the two subjects is not hard to describe
and enables abstract ideas to be exemplified by bricks and mortar,
in the spirit of the Poincaré quotation I used earlier."

— Sir Michael Atiyah, "The Art of Mathematics"
     in the AMS Notices , January 2010

Judy Bass, Los Angeles Times , March 12, 1989 —

"Like Rubik's Cube, The Eight  demands to be pondered."

As does a figure from 1984, Cullinane's Cube —

The Eightfold Cube

For natural group actions on the Cullinane cube, 
see "The Eightfold Cube" and
"A Simple Reflection Group of Order 168."

See also the recent post Cube Bricks 1984

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168

Related remark from the literature —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110918-Felsner.jpg

Note that only the static structure is described by Felsner, not the
168 group actions discussed by Cullinane. For remarks on such
group actions in the literature, see "Cube Space, 1984-2003."

(From Anatomy of a Cube, Sept. 18, 2011.)

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Dead Reckoning

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:28 PM

Continued from yesterday evening

IMAGE- Bogart in 'Casablanca' with chessboard

Today's mathematical birthday — 

Claude Chevalley, 11 Feb. 1909 – 28 June 1984.

From MacTutor —

Chevalley's daughter, Catherine Chevalley, wrote about
her father in "Claude Chevalley described by his daughter"
(1988):—

For him it was important to see questions as a whole, to see the necessity of a proof, its global implications. As to rigour, all the members of Bourbaki cared about it: the Bourbaki movement was started essentially because rigour was lacking among French mathematicians, by comparison with the Germans, that is the Hilbertians. Rigour consisted in getting rid of an accretion of superfluous details. Conversely, lack of rigour gave my father an impression of a proof where one was walking in mud, where one had to pick up some sort of filth in order to get ahead. Once that filth was taken away, one could get at the mathematical object, a sort of crystallized body whose essence is its structure. When that structure had been constructed, he would say it was an object which interested him, something to look at, to admire, perhaps to turn around, but certainly not to transform. For him, rigour in mathematics consisted in making a new object which could thereafter remain unchanged.

The way my father worked, it seems that this was what counted most, this production of an object which then became inert— dead, really. It was no longer to be altered or transformed. Not that there was any negative connotation to this. But I must add that my father was probably the only member of Bourbaki who thought of mathematics as a way to put objects to death for aesthetic reasons.

Recent scholarly news suggests a search for Chapel Hill
in this journal. That search leads to Transformative Hermeneutics.
Those who, like Professor Eucalyptus of Wallace Stevens's
New Haven, seek God "in the object itself" may contemplate
yesterday's afternoon post on Eightfold Design in light of the
Transformative post and of yesterday's New Haven remarks and
Chapel Hill events.

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

In Memoriam…

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:25 PM

industrial designer Kenji Ekuan —

Eightfold Design.

The adjective "eightfold," intrinsic to Buddhist
thought, was hijacked by Gell-Mann and later 
by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute
(MSRI, pronounced "misery").  The adjective's
application to a 2x2x2 cube consisting of eight
subcubes, "the eightfold cube," is not intended to
have either Buddhist or Semitic overtones.  
It is pure mathematics.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Source of the Finite

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:20 AM

"Die Unendlichkeit  ist die uranfängliche Tatsache: es wäre nur
zu erklären, woher das Endliche  stamme…."

— Friedrich Nietzsche, Das Philosophenbuch/Le livre du philosophe
(Paris: Aubier-Flammarion, 1969), fragment 120, p. 118

Cited as above, and translated as "Infinity is the original fact;
what has to be explained is the source of the finite…." in
The Production of Space , by Henri Lefebvre. (Oxford: Blackwell,
1991 (1974)), p.  181.

This quotation was suggested by the Bauhaus-related phrase
"the laws of cubical space" (see yesterday's Schau der Gestalt )
and by the laws of cubical space discussed in the webpage
Cube Space, 1984-2003.

For a less rigorous approach to space at the Harvard Graduate
School of Design, see earlier references to Lefebvre in this journal.

Sunday, September 18, 2011

Anatomy of a Cube

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

R.D. Carmichael's seminal 1931 paper on tactical configurations suggests
a search for later material relating such configurations to block designs.
Such a search yields the following

"… it seems that the relationship between
BIB [balanced incomplete block ] designs
and tactical configurations, and in particular,
the Steiner system, has been overlooked."
— D. A. Sprott, U. of Toronto, 1955

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110918-SprottAndCube.jpg

The figure by Cullinane included above shows a way to visualize Sprott's remarks.

For the group actions described by Cullinane, see "The Eightfold Cube" and
"A Simple Reflection Group of Order 168."

Update of 7:42 PM Sept. 18, 2011—

From a Summer 2011 course on discrete structures at a Berlin website—

A different illustration of the eightfold cube as the Steiner system S(3, 4, 8)—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110918-Felsner.jpg

Note that only the static structure is described by Felsner, not the
168 group actions discussed (as above) by Cullinane. For remarks on
such group actions in the literature, see "Cube Space, 1984-2003."

Saturday, June 25, 2011

The Fano Entity

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:02 AM

The New York Times  at 9 PM ET June 23, 2011

ROBERT FANO: I’m trying to think briefly how to put it.

GINO FANO: "On the Fundamental Postulates"—

"E la prova di questo si ha precisamente nel fatto che si è potuto costruire (o, dirò meglio immaginare) un ente per cui sono verificati tutti i postulati precedenti…."

"The proof of this is precisely the fact that you could build (or, to say it better, imagine) an entity by which are verified all previous assumptions…."

Also from the Times  article quoted above…

"… like working on a cathedral. We laid our bricks and knew that others might later replace them with better bricks. We believed in the cause even if we didn’t completely understand the implications.”

— Tom Van Vleck

Some art that is related, if only by a shared metaphor, to Van Vleck's cathedral—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110624-1984-Bricks-Sm.jpg

The art is also related to the mathematics of Gino Fano.

For an explanation of this relationship (implicit in the above note from 1984),
see "The Fano plane revisualized—or: the eIghtfold cube."

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Prime Cubes

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:09 AM

The title refers not to numbers  of the form p 3, p  prime, but to geometric  cubes with p 3 subcubes.

Such cubes are natural models for the finite vector spaces acted upon by general linear groups viewed as permutation  groups of degree  (not order ) p 3.

IMAGE- From preface to Larry C. Grove, 'Classical Groups and Geometric Algebra

For the case p =2, see The Eightfold Cube.

For the case p =3, see the "External links" section of the Nov. 30, 2009, version of Wikipedia article "General Linear Group." (That is the version just prior to the Dec. 14, 2009, revision by anonymous user "Greenfernglade.")

For symmetries of group actions for larger primes, see the related 1985 remark* on two -dimensional linear groups—

"Actions of GL(2,p )  on a p ×p  coordinate-array
have the same sorts of symmetries,
where p  is any odd prime."

* Group Actions, 1984-2009

Monday, June 21, 2010

Cube Spaces

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:30 AM

Cubic models of finite geometries
display an interplay between
Euclidean and Galois geometry.

Example 1— The 2×2×2 Cube—

also known as the eightfold  cube

2x2x2 cube

Group actions on the eightfold cube, 1984

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100621-diandwh-detail.GIF

Version by Laszlo Lovasz et al., 2003—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100621-LovaszCubeSpace.gif

Lovasz et al. go on to describe the same group actions
as in the 1984 note, without attribution.
 

Example 2— The 3×3×3 Cube

A note from 1985 describing group actions on a 3×3 plane array—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100621-VisualizingDetail.gif

Undated software by Ed Pegg Jr. displays
group actions on a 3×3×3 cube that extend the
  3×3 group actions from 1985 described above—

Ed Pegg Jr.'s program at Wolfram demonstrating concepts of a 1985 
note by Cullinane

Pegg gives no reference to the 1985 work on group actions.
 

Example 3— The 4×4×4 Cube

A note from 27 years ago today—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100621-Cube830621.gif

As far as I know, this version of the
group-actions theorem has not yet been ripped off.

Tuesday, January 6, 2009

Tuesday January 6, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 AM
Archetypes, Synchronicity,
and Dyson on Jung

The current (Feb. 2009) Notices of the American Mathematical Society has a written version of Freeman Dyson’s 2008 Einstein Lecture, which was to have been given in October but had to be canceled. Dyson paraphrases a mathematician on Carl Jung’s theory of archetypes:

“… we do not need to accept Jung’s theory as true in order to find it illuminating.”

The same is true of Jung’s remarks on synchronicity.

For example —

Yesterday’s entry, “A Wealth of Algebraic Structure,” lists two articles– each, as it happens, related to Jung’s four-diamond figure from Aion as well as to my own Notes on Finite Geometry. The articles were placed online recently by Cambridge University Press on the following dates:

R. T. Curtis’s 1974 article defining his Miracle Octad Generator (MOG) was published online on Oct. 24, 2008.

Curtis’s 1987 article on geometry and algebraic structure in the MOG was published online on Dec. 19, 2008.

On these dates, the entries in this journal discussed…

Oct. 24:
Cube Space, 1984-2003

Material related to that entry:

Dec. 19:
Art and Religion: Inside the White Cube

That entry discusses a book by Mark C. Taylor:

The Picture in Question: Mark Tansey and the Ends of Representation (U. of Chicago Press, 1999).

In Chapter 3, “Sutures of Structures,” Taylor asks —

“What, then, is a frame, and what is frame work?”

One possible answer —

Hermann Weyl on the relativity problem in the context of the 4×4 “frame of reference” found in the above Cambridge University Press articles.

“Examples are the stained-glass
windows of knowledge.”
— Vladimir Nabokov 

Friday, December 19, 2008

Friday December 19, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 1:06 PM
Inside the
White Cube

Part I: The White Cube

The Eightfold Cube

Part II: Inside
 
The Paradise of Childhood'-- Froebel's Third Gift

Part III: Outside

Mark Tansey, 'The Key' (1984)

Click to enlarge.

Mark Tansey, The Key (1984)

For remarks on religion
related to the above, see
Log24 on the Garden of Eden
and also Mark C. Taylor,
"What Derrida Really Meant"
(New York Times, Oct. 14, 2004).

For some background on Taylor,
see Wikipedia. Taylor, Chairman
of the Department of Religion
at
Columbia University, has a
1973 doctorate in religion from
Harvard University. His opinion
of Derrida indicates that his
sympathies lie more with
the serpent than with the angel
in the Tansey picture above.

For some remarks by Taylor on
the art of Tansey relevant to the
structure of the white cube
(Part I above), see Taylor's
The Picture in Question:
Mark Tansey and the
Ends of Representation

(U. of Chicago Press, 1999):

From Chapter 3,
"Sutures* of Structures," p. 58:

"What, then, is a frame, and what is frame work?

This question is deceptive in its simplicity. A frame is, of course, 'a basic skeletal structure designed to give shape or support' (American Heritage Dictionary)…. when the frame is in question, it is difficult to determine what is inside and what is outside. Rather than being on one side or the other, the frame is neither inside nor outside. Where, then, Derrida queries, 'does the frame take place….'"

* P. 61:
"… the frame forms the suture of structure. A suture is 'a seamless [sic**] joint or line of articulation,' which, while joining two surfaces, leaves the trace of their separation."

 ** A dictionary says "a seamlike joint or line of articulation," with no mention of "trace," a term from Derrida's jargon.

Friday, October 24, 2008

Friday October 24, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 8:08 AM
The Cube Space” is a name given to the eightfold cube in a vulgarized mathematics text, Discrete Mathematics: Elementary and Beyond, by Laszlo Lovasz et al., published by Springer in 2003. The identification in a natural way of the eight points of the linear 3-space over the 2-element field GF(2) with the eight vertices of a cube is an elementary and rather obvious construction, doubtless found in a number of discussions of discrete mathematics. But the less-obvious generation of the affine group AGL(3,2) of order 1344 by permutations of parallel edges in such a cube may (or may not) have originated with me. For descriptions of this process I wrote in 1984, see Diamonds and Whirls and Binary Coordinate Systems. For a vulgarized description of this process by Lovasz, without any acknowledgement of his sources, see an excerpt from his book.

Tuesday, June 7, 2005

Tuesday June 7, 2005

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:01 PM
The Sequel to Rhetoric 101:

101 101

“A SINGLE VERSE by Rimbaud,”
writes Dominique de Villepin,
the new French Prime Minister,
“shines like a powder trail
on a day’s horizon.
It sets it ablaze all at once,
explodes all limits,
draws the eyes
to other heavens.”

— Ben Macintyre,
The London Times, June 4:

When Rimbaud Meets Rambo


“Room 101 was the place where
your worst fears were realised
in George Orwell’s classic
 Nineteen Eighty-Four.

[101 was also]
Professor Nash’s office number
  in the movie ‘A Beautiful Mind.'”

Prime Curios

Classics Illustrated —

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05A/050607-Nightmare.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Click on picture for details.

(For some mathematics that is actually
from 1984, see Block Designs
and the 2005 followup
The Eightfold Cube.)

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