Log24

Saturday, August 4, 2018

Triple Cross

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:57 PM

(Continued)

See also

This post was suggested by Log24 remarks on May 4, 2014,
the date of Garrett Lisi's Twitter post announcing the opening
of his Pacific Science Institute (see previous post).

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Triple Cross

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 1:30 PM

(Continued See the title in this journal, as well as Cube Bricks.)

Cube Bricks 1984 —

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168
Related material —

Dirac and Geometry in this journal,
Kummer's Quartic Surface in this journal,
Nanavira Thera in this journal, and
The Razor's Edge  and Nanavira Thera.

See as well Bill Murray's 1984 film "The Razor's Edge"

Movie poster from 1984 —

"A thin line separates
love from hate,
success from failure,
life from death."

Three other dualities, from Nanavira Thera in 1959 —

"I find that there are, in every situation,
three independent dualities…."

(Click to enlarge.)

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Triple Cross

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 AM

Continues.

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:08 PM

Continues.

It was a dark and stormy night 

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110420-DarkAndStormy-Logicomix.jpg

— Page 180, Logicomix

Sunday, September 1, 2013

The Crossword Omen

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:48 AM

August 30, 11:01 AM  Comment-Worthy

August 30, 12:00 PM  Hymn

August 30, 7:20 PM  Her

August 31, 8:23 PM  What Where

September 1, 5:48 AM  The Crossword Omen —

IMAGE- Crossword Nexus site, with top photo of word 'OMEN,' giving 'BUM' as the leading possible answer to the clue 'London derriere'

Related material: A critic's remarks on the missing character "Bum"
in Beckett's play "What Where" and Rimbaud on the vowel "U"—

(Click to enlarge.)

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

(Continued)

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract." —A novel from Crosswicks

Related material from a 1905 graduate of Princeton,
"The 3-Space PG(3,2) and Its Group," is now available
at Internet Archive (1 download thus far).

The 3-space paper is relevant because of the
connection of the group it describes to the
"super, overarching" group of the tesseract.

Saturday, March 16, 2013

The Crosswicks Curse

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Continues.

From the prologue to the new Joyce Carol Oates
novel Accursed

"This journey I undertake with such anticipation
is not one of geographical space but one of Time—
for it is the year 1905 that is my destination.

1905!—the very year of the Curse."

Today's previous post supplied a fanciful link
between the Crosswicks Curse of Oates and
the Crosswicks tesseract  of Madeleine L'Engle.

The Crosswicks Curse according to L'Engle
in her classic 1962 novel A Wrinkle in Time —

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract."

A tesseract is a 4-dimensional hypercube that
(as pointed out by Coxeter in 1950) may also 
be viewed as a 4×4 array (with opposite edges
identified).

Meanwhile, back in 1905

For more details, see how the Rosenhain and Göpel tetrads occur naturally
in the diamond theorem model of the 35 lines of the 15-point projective
Galois space PG(3,2).

See also Conwell in this journal and George Macfeely Conwell in the
honors list of the Princeton Class of 1905.

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Deutsche Ordnung

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 8:22 PM

The title is from a phrase spoken, notably, by Yul Brynner
to Christopher Plummer in the 1966 film "Triple Cross."

Related structures —

Greg Egan's animated image of the Klein quartic —

For a tetrahedral key to the arrangement of the 56 triangles within the above
structure, see a book chapter by Michael Huber of Tübingen

For further details, see the June 29 post Triangles in the Eightfold Cube.

See also, from an April 2013 philosophical conference:

Abstract for a talk at the City University of New York:

The Experience of Meaning 
Jan Zwicky, University of Victoria 
09:00-09:40 Friday, April 5, 2013

Once the question of truth is settled, and often prior to it, what we value in a mathematical proof or conjecture is what we value in a work of lyric art: potency of meaning. An absence of clutter is a feature of such artifacts: they possess a resonant clarity that allows their meaning to break on our inner eye like light. But this absence of clutter is not tantamount to 'being simple': consider Eliot's Four Quartets  or Mozart's late symphonies. Some truths are complex, and they are simplified  at the cost of distortion, at the cost of ceasing to be  truths. Nonetheless, it's often possible to express a complex truth in a way that precipitates a powerful experience of meaning. It is that experience we seek — not simplicity per se , but the flash of insight, the sense we've seen into the heart of things. I'll first try to say something about what is involved in such recognitions; and then something about why an absence of clutter matters to them.

For the talk itself, see a YouTube video.

The conference talks also appear in a book.

The book begins with an epigraph by Hilbert

Monday, June 4, 2018

The Trinity Stone Defined

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 8:56 PM

"Unsheathe your dagger definitions." — James Joyce, Ulysses

The "triple cross" link in the previous post referenced the eightfold cube
as a structure that might be called the trinity stone .

An Approach to Symmetric Generation of the Simple Group of Order 168

Some small Galois spaces (the Cullinane models)

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Trinity Stone

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:18 PM

Or:  "What Dreams May Come"

(For the foxtail girl)

"Most religious beliefs are not true. But here’s the crux.
The emotional brain doesn’t care. It doesn’t operate on
the grounds of true and false. Emotions are not true or false.
Even a terrible fear inside a dream is still a terrible fear."

— Stephen T. Asma in the New York Times  philosophy
column "The Stone" today

See also Triple Cross

In greater depth:

Posts tagged on131004, a tag derived from a date in
a Google search today 

For enthusiasts of symbology, a webpage illustrated here this morning —

.

This morning's review of this Ajna webpage was suggested by posts from 
the Oct. 4, 2013, date  in the Google crux  search above.

Saturday, July 8, 2017

Das Nichts … According to Albee

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:22 PM

"Deutsche Ordnung." — Yul Brynner
  in the 1966 film "Triple Cross"

Monday, December 26, 2016

Fanciful (continued)

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 PM

From "Plato Thanks the Academy," March 19, 2014 —

IMAGE- Art Jeffries (Bruce Willis) and Simon Lynch (Miko Hughes), 'Mercury Rising' (1998)

“Click on fanciful .”

A possible result —

See also "Triple Cross."

Friday, November 4, 2016

Pop Hit

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:56 PM

The Washington Post  yesterday evening —

Kay Starr, ferociously expressive singer
who had pop hit with ‘Wheel of Fortune,’
dies at 94

By Adam Bernstein November 3 at 8:01 PM 

Kay Starr, a ferociously expressive singer whose ability to infuse swing, pop and country songs with her own indelible, bluesy stamp made her one of the most admired recording artists of her generation, died Nov. 3 at her home in Los Angeles. She was 94.

Midrash —

Yesterday afternoon's post "Triple Cross" and

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Deo Gratias

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

See also a Log24 search for Triple Cross.

Saturday, March 19, 2016

The Logorium of Doctor Parnassus*

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Triple Cross logo

Click image for further details.

* Title adapted from a film released on Jan. 8, 2010.
   See also this journal on that date.

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Tiger’s Leap  to 1905

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:03 PM

Walter Benjamin on 'a tiger's leap into the past'

See other posts
now tagged
Crosswicks Curse.

 

Click to enlarge:

Block Designs?

Sunday, August 25, 2019

An Epstein Requiem

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:21 PM

"Look at what you've done
Why, you've become a grown-up girl"

See also September Morn in this  journal.

Design Theory

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 7:58 PM

"Mein Führer Steiner"

See Hitler Plans and Quadruple System.

"There is  such a thing as a quadruple system."

— Saying adapted from a 1962 young-adult novel

Friday, August 9, 2019

Design Theory

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:48 PM

Click to enlarge:

Block Designs?

Monday, July 8, 2019

Exploring Schoolgirl Space

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 9:48 AM

See also "Quantum Tesseract Theorem" and "The Crosswicks Curse."

Sunday, October 14, 2018

Logos

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 AM

New and old AMS logos —

I prefer the old.  Related material —

For an old Crosswicks curse, see that phrase in this journal.

For a new curse, see . . .

    "Unsheathe your dagger definitions." — James Joyce.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Something to Behold

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:45 PM

From a review of a Joyce Carol Oates novel
at firstthings.com on August 23, 2013 —

"Though the Curse is eventually exorcised,
it is through an act of wit and guile,
not an act of repentance or reconciliation.
And so we may wonder if Oates has put this story
to rest, or if it simply lays dormant. A twenty-first
century eruption of the 'Crosswicks Curse
would be something to behold." [Link added.]

Related material —

A film version of A Wrinkle in Time

The Hamilton watch from "Interstellar" (2014) —

See also a post, Vacant Space, from 8/23/13 (the date
of the above review), and posts tagged Space Writer.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

The Horse

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:23 AM

A New York Times  piece today on author Donald Antrim:

“The next project is a novel ‘about’ (having loosely to do with)
his father, Harry, a T. S. Eliot scholar who wrote a well-regarded
monograph on the poet.”

— John Jeremiah Sullivan

From Harry T. Antrim’s 1967 thesis on Eliot:

“That words can be made to reach across the void
left by the disappearance of God (and hence of all
Absolutes) and thereby reestablish some basis of
relation with forms existing outside the subjective
and ego-centered self has been one of the chief
concerns of the first half of the twentieth century.”

An epigraph selected by Sullivan for a 2002 Harper’s Magazine
article, “Horseman, Pass By“—

Far back, far back in our dark soul
the horse prances.

— D. H. Lawrence

A related image from pure mathematics
(a source of Absolutes unrelated to theology):

See April 9, 2004, for a post on the “Horseman” article.

Friday, May 2, 2014

Midrash

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

From today's 3 AM (ET) post "Quote":

“You’ve got to decide which side of the cross you’re on."

Perhaps both? See yesterday morning's Jerusalem Post —

"Although he was one of Israel’s best known
secular, leftwing bohemians, he achieved
some of his greatest success as an actor
playing as ultra-Orthodox and national-religious
characters."

See also a similar ambiguity in Damnation Morning.

Quote

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 AM

"You've got to decide which side of the cross you're on.
I need nailers, not hangers."

Body of Lies

Friday, March 14, 2014

The Search for Charles Wallace

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:19 PM

The search in the previous post for the source of a quotation from Poincaré yielded, as a serendipitous benefit, information on an interesting psychoanalyst named Wilfred Bion (see the Poincaré  quotation at a webpage on Bion). This in turn suggested a search for the source of the name of author Madeleine L'Engle's son Bion, who may have partly inspired L'Engle's fictional character Charles Wallace.  Cynthia Zarin wrote about Bion in The New Yorker  of April 12, 2004 that

"According to the family, he is the person for whom L’Engle’s insistence on blurring fiction and reality had the most disastrous consequences."

Also from that article, material related to the name Bion and to what this journal has called "the Crosswicks Curse"*—

"Madeleine L’Engle Camp was born in 1918 in New York City, the only child of Madeleine Hall Barnett, of Jacksonville, Florida, and Charles Wadsworth Camp, a Princeton man and First World War veteran, whose family had a big country place in New Jersey, called Crosswicks. In Jacksonville society, the Barnett family was legendary: Madeleine’s grandfather, Bion Barnett, the chairman of the board of Jacksonville’s Barnett Bank, had run off with a woman to the South of France, leaving behind a note on the mantel. Her grandmother, Caroline Hallows L’Engle, never recovered from the blow. ….

… The summer after Hugh and Madeleine were married, they bought a dilapidated farmhouse in Goshen, in northwest Connecticut. Josephine, born in 1947, was three years old when they moved permanently to the house, which they called Crosswicks. Bion was born just over a year later."

* "There is  such a thing as a tesseract."

Saturday, March 8, 2014

Women’s History Month

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 PM

For the Princeton Class of 1905 —

Joyce Carol Oates Meets Emily Dickinson.

Oates —

"It is an afternoon in autumn, near dusk.
The western sky is a spider’s web of translucent gold.
I am being brought by carriage—two horses—
muted thunder of their hooves—
along narrow country roads between hilly fields
touched with the sun’s slanted rays,
to the village of Princeton, New Jersey.
The urgent pace of the horses has a dreamlike air,
like the rocking motion of the carriage;
and whoever is driving the horses
his face I cannot see, only his back—
stiff, straight, in a tight-fitting dark coat."

Dickinson —

"Because I could not stop for Death—
He kindly stopped for me—
The Carriage held but just Ourselves—
And Immortality."

Saturday, August 31, 2013

What Where

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:23 PM

The news item at lower right in the above image, with the phrase "surprise U-turn,"
suggests some remarks related to this summer's Enniskillen festival.

Friday, August 30, 2013

Her

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 7:20 PM

(A sequel to today's noon post, Hymn)

Portrait, in the 2013 film Oblivion , of  a 2005 graduate
of London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art —

London derrière.

Hymn

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Londonderry Air

"By recalling the past and freezing the present
he could open the gates of time…."

— Mark Helprin,  In Sunlight and in Shadow

Comment-Worthy

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:01 AM

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Tag (Part II)

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:29 AM

(Continued from yesterday evening)

Madeleine L'Engle in The Irrational Season
(1977), Chapter 9:

"After A Wrinkle in Time  was finally published,
it was pointed out to me that the villain, a naked
disembodied brain, was called 'It' because It
stands for Intellectual truth as opposed to a truth
which involves the whole of us, heart as well as
mind.  That acronym had never occurred to me. 
I chose the name It intuitively, because an IT
does not have a heart or soul.  And I did not
understand consciously at the time of writing
that the intellect, when it is not informed by
the heart, is evil."

You're…  IT.

Related material: Mathematics as a Post-Communist Activity.

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Cover Acts

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

The Daily Princetonian  today:

IMAGE- 'How Jay White, a Neil Diamond cover act, duped Princeton'

A different cover act, discussed here  Saturday:

IMAGE- The diamond theorem affine group of order 322,560, published without acknowledgment of its source by the Mathematical Association of America in 2011

See also, in this journal, the Galois tesseract and the Crosswicks Curse.

"There is  such a thing as a tesseract." — Crosswicks saying

Saturday, February 6, 2010

Conceptual Art

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 AM

The Plane of Time

From tomorrow's NY Times Book Review, Geoff Dyer's review of DeLillo's new novel Point Omega is now online

"The book begins and ends with Douglas Gordon’s film project '24 Hour Psycho' (installed at the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan in 2006), in which the 109-­minute Hitchcock original is slowed so that it takes a full day and night to twitch by. DeLillo conveys with haunting lucidity the uncanny beauty of 'the actor’s eyes in slow transit across his bony sockets,' 'Janet Leigh in the detailed process of not knowing what is about to happen to her.' Of course, DeLillo being DeLillo, it’s the deeper implications of the piece— what it reveals about the nature of film, perception and time— that detain him. As an unidentified spectator, DeLillo is mesmerized by the 'radically altered plane of time': 'The less there was to see, the harder he looked, the more he saw.'

This prologue and epilogue make up a phenomenological essay on one of the rare artworks of recent times to merit the prefix 'conceptual.'"

Related material:

Steering a Space-Plane
(February 2, 2003)

Holly Day
(February 3, 2010)

Attitude Adjustment
(February 3, 2010)

Stephen Savage illustration for 2/2/03 NYT review of 'A Box of Matches'

Cover illustration by Stephen Savage,
NY Times Book Review,
Feb. 2 (Candlemas), 2003

“We live the time that a match flickers.”

– Robert Louis Stevenson, Aes Triplex

Monday, April 26, 2004

Monday April 26, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:01 AM

Philosophy

From today’s New York Times:

“Philip Hamburger, a writer for The New Yorker for more than six decades whose meticulously calibrated inflections — sober, droll and everything in between — helped create and nurture the magazine’s reputation for urbanity, died on Friday [April 23, Shakespeare’s birthday] at Columbia Presbyterian Center in Manhattan. He was 89….

Although he had a light touch, reflecting his own affability, there were times when he did not seek to amuse.”

From Friday’s rather unamusing log24 entry on the philosophy of mathematical proof, a link to a site listed in the Open Directory under

Society: Philosophy: Philosophy of Logic: Truth Definitions

“See also The Story Theory of Truth.”

From the weekend edition (April 24-25) of aldaily.com, a Jew’s answer to Pilate’s question:

With a philosophy degree you can ask such difficult questions as “What is truth?”, “Can we know the good?”, and “Do you want fries with that?”… more»

Whether Hamburger’s last Friday was in any sense a “good” Friday, I do not know.

Related religious meditations….

From Holy Thursday, April 8, 2004:

The Triple Crown of Philosophy,

which links to a Hamburger song, and

from Good Friday, April 9, 2004,

Temptation,

an unorthodox portrait of a New Yorker as St. Peter — from Scorsese’s “The Last Temptation of Christ.”

The many connoisseurs of death who admire Mel Gibson’s latest film can skip the final meditation, from the admirable Carol Iannone:

The Last Temptation Reconsidered.

They, as someone once said, have their reward.

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