Log24

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Found …

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:02 PM

( A sequel to the previous post, Lost )

From a link, "A Little Boy and a Little Girl," found in a Log24
search for Andersen + Atlantic

"A few flakes of snow were falling, and one of them, rather larger
than the rest, alighted on the edge of one of the flower boxes.
This snow-flake grew larger and larger, till at last it became
the figure of a woman, dressed in garments of white gauze,
which looked like millions of starry snow-flakes linked together.
She was fair and beautiful, but made of ice—
shining and glittering ice." — "The Snow Queen"

Related material —

Analogue of the little boy from "The Snow Queen" in "Equals" (2015) —

"Nice piece of ice." — Brendan Fraser in
"The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor" (2008).

See also the concept that everything adds up to nothing in
"The Zero Theorem" (2013) 

and the Conway-Norton-Ryba theorem (2017).

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Glitter at the Dark Tower

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

"The centre of transformations that
Transform for transformation's self,

In a glitter that is a life, a gold
That is a being, a will, a fate."

— Wallace Stevens, "Human Arrangement"

From "The Dark Tower," a post of July 9, 2016 —

See also a search for Glitter in this journal.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Seeking Eden

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:45 PM

From Wikipedia

"Emily Eden  a hardened New York City homicide detective,
goes undercover to investigate the murder of a Hasidic 
diamond-cutter."

Midrash — See "Diamond + Dust + Glitter."

Monday, May 16, 2016

Jew at the Glitter Ball

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM

The title refers to Frederick Seidel and
to a post of April 29, "At the Still Point."

Sunday, May 15, 2016

Fake Eliot

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:30 PM

The New Yorker

Poems | September 3, 2012 issue

House Master

BY FREDERICK SEIDEL

. . . .

"I remember everything.
I remember nothing.
I remember ancient Greek sparkles like a diamond ring."

. . . .

See also posts now tagged "One Ring"
and a search in this journal for "Glitter."

One Ring

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 5:06 PM

(Continued from May 11 and May 15.)

Poem by Eleanor Wilner from 'Reversing the Spell' speaks of diamonds and 'glitter.' (Pbk. publ. Nov. 1, 1997)

Friday, April 29, 2016

Blackboard Jungle…

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Continues .

An older and wiser James Spader —

"Never underestimate the power of glitter."

Glitter by Josefine Lyche, as of diamond dust

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

A Geometric Glitter

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:10 AM

"In the planes that tilt hard revelations on
The eye, a geometric glitter, tiltings …."

— Wallace Stevens, "Someone Puts a Pineapple Together" (1947)

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Art and Geometry

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 1:20 PM

See "Behind the Glitter" (a recent magazine article
on Oslo artist Josefine Lyche), and the much more
informative web page Contact (from Noplace, Oslo).

From the latter —

"Semiotics is a game of ascribing meaning, or content, to mere surface."

Monday, February 21, 2011

How Deep the Rabbit Hole Goes

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:17 PM

The sequel to Another Manic Monday and The Abacus Conundrum

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110221-BaublesBanglesBeads.jpg

You'll glitter and gleam so
Make somebody dream so that
Some day he may buy you a ring, ringa-linga
I've heard that's where it leads…

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110221-SinatraLeigh.jpg

Related material — Janet's Tea Party

Sunday, February 20, 2011

Sermon

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:30 AM

From Galleri MGM in Oslo —

IMAGE- 'PRESS RELEASE' headline

Josefine Lyche
Theme and Variations
26. February – 28. March 2009
Opening reception 26. February 19.00 – 21.00

"Why do we remember the past, but not the future?"
Stephen Hawking, A Brief History of Time, Ch. 9, "The Arrow of Time"

"If you want a vision of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face – forever."
George Orwell

Galleri MGM is pleased to present the second solo exhibition by Josefine Lyche (b.1973).

Lyche presents a body of work consisting of sculptures and a wall painting, as well as a series of new paperwork, all using geometrical abstractions and light as a medium. Her work dissolves boundaries between fiction and documentation, depicting how fantasies and dreams collide with and yet help determine the shape of reality.

Theme and variations is a term most commonly used in the music genre as a musical form in which the fundamental musical idea, or theme, is repeated in altered form or accompanied in a different manner.

The exhibition explores geometric shapes and solids and revisits work of artists like Robert Morris and Ellsworth Kelly, giving it a disco treatment of glitter, neon and gloss. The mathematical, science-fiction and new age references incorporated in the works comments on the ambivalent foretelling of utopian hope and dystopian vision of a near, yet unknown future.

The transmission between past and future is shown in the sculpture "The Omega Point" a portal that leads in or out of time and space. …

A connection to today's earlier post, Sunday SchoolThe Oslo Version, from Friday, May 21, 2010.

Lyche's "Omega Point" portal, together with her last name, suggested three posts from the following Saturday morning— which later proved to be the date of Martin Gardner's death—

Art Space, Through the Lyche Gate and The Lyche Gate Asterisk.

For some further religious remarks, see November 9th, 2010— A Theory of Pure Design.

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Consolation Prizes

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:25 AM

For Tom Hanks

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101102-NYlotteryHead.jpg

and Kristin Davis

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101102-NYlottery.jpg

__________________________________________

Interpretations

7/23/09 — Artistic Vision

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101103-ArtisticVision.jpg

7/21/09 — The Lotus

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101102-MirrorBall-McLachlan.jpg

"And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
The surface glittered out of heart of light"

__________________________________________

Background

Sunday night, Tuesday morning and afternoon

Monday, October 4, 2010

Stone Junction

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 6:29 AM

Continued from May 18, 2010.

Previous logo for the New York Times  feature "The Stone"—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101004-IntroducingTheStone100518.jpg

Today's new logo, appearing retroactively

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101004-NYT-newstonelogo.png

Comparison—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100518-TheStoneNYT.jpg   http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101004-NYT-thestone75.gif

From the October 3 "The Stone," Hegel on Wall Street

The “Phenomenology” is a philosophical portrait gallery that presents depictions, one after another, of different, fundamental ways in which individuals and societies have understood themselves.  Each self-understanding has two parts: an account of how a particular kind of self understands itself and, then, an account of the world that the self considers its natural counterpart.  Hegel narrates how each formation of self and world collapses because of a mismatch between self-conception and how that self conceives of the larger world.  Hegel thinks we can see how history has been driven by misshapen forms of life in which the self-understanding of agents and the worldly practices they participate in fail to correspond.  With great drama, he claims that his narrative is a “highway of despair.”

J.M. Bernstein of the New School for Social Research

A two-part self-understanding that is not  from Hegel—

1. An account of how a particular kind of self understands itself:

            … world’s wildfire, leave but ash:
                In a flash, at a trumpet crash,
I am all at once what Christ is, ' since he was what I am, and
This Jack, joke, poor potsherd, ' patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,
                Is immortal diamond.

2. An account of the world that the self considers its natural counterpart:

CLOUD-PUFFBALL, torn tufts, tossed pillows ' flaunt forth, then chevy on an air-
built thoroughfare: heaven-roysterers, in gay-gangs ' they throng; they glitter in marches.
Down roughcast, down dazzling whitewash, ' wherever an elm arches,
Shivelights and shadowtackle in long ' lashes lace, lance, and pair.
Delightfully the bright wind boisterous ' ropes, wrestles, beats earth bare
Of yestertempest’s creases; in pool and rut peel parches
Squandering ooze to squeezed ' dough, crust, dust; stanches, starches
Squadroned masks and manmarks ' treadmire toil there
Footfretted in it. Million-fuelèd, ' nature’s bonfire burns on.

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Tuesday July 21, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Today's Readings:

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Thursday July 16, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 PM
 
Mother of Beauty
continued from
April 7, 2004

In memory of Julius Shulman,
architectural photographer,
who died last night:

"And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
  The surface glittered out of heart of light…"

Four Quartets, quoted here
November 22, 2004

Photo by Gerry Gantt, and the Jewel in Venn's Lotus

"… as in the hearth and heart of light." 

Delmore Schwartz   

(See previous entry.)

Saturday, November 29, 2008

Saturday November 29, 2008

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:06 PM
The Messier Brand

Virginia Heffernan on the film version of A Wrinkle in Time:

“… the film is also sad, and soaring. It recalls the hippie days when a perverse, hubristic originality was a quality to be cultivated, not medicated. Told not from an aloof remove– through the eyes of a wise Yoda or Peter Jackson– the movie glitters irregularly, woven through with the sparkling fibers of a righteous child’s tormented imagination. Steven Spielberg also attempted, with the same ambiguous but moving results, this messier brand of science fiction in ‘A.I.'”

Log24 on
 Jan. 21, 2007:

California Dreamin’, Part II

Spielberg, A.I., and Robot Wisdom

Related material:

An entry of
Dec. 29, 2006,
and entries of
Jan. 20, 2007.

See also today’s
 previous entries.

Happy birthday,
Denny Doherty.

Monday, October 1, 2007

Monday October 1, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:20 AM
Bright as Magnesium

“Definitive”

— The New York Times,  
Sept. 30, 2007, on
Blade Runner:
The Final Cut

Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, N.J.

“The art historian Kirk Varnedoe died on August 14, 2003, after a long and valiant battle with cancer. He was 57. He was a faculty member in the Institute for Advanced Study’s School of Historical Studies, where he was the fourth art historian to hold this prestigious position, first held by the German Renaissance scholar Erwin Panofsky in the 1930s.”

Hal Crowther

“His final lecture was an eloquent, prophetic flight of free association….

Varnedoe chose to introduce his final lecture with the less-quoted last words of the android Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer) in Ridley Scott’s film Blade Runner: ‘I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe– attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion, bright as magnesium; I rode on the back decks of a blinker and watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in the rain. Time to die.'”


Related material: 
tears in the rain–

Game Over
(Nov. 5, 2003):

The film "The Matrix," illustrated

Coordinates for generating the Miracle Octad Generator

Friday, May 19, 2006

Friday May 19, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:00 AM
Star and Diamond
 
continued

” ‘I know what it is you last saw,’ she said; ‘for that is also in my mind. Do not be afraid! But do not think that only by singing amid the trees, nor even by the slender arrows of elvenbows, is this land of Lothlórien maintained and defended against the Enemy. I say to you, Frodo, that even as I speak to you, I perceive the Dark Lord and know his mind, or all his mind that concerns the Elves. And he gropes ever to see me and my thought. But still the door is closed!’
      She lifted up her white arms, and spread out her hands towards the East in a gesture of rejection and denial. Eärendil, the Evening Star, most beloved of the Elves, shone clear above. So bright was it that the figure of the Elven-lady cast a dim shadow on the ground. Its ray glanced upon a ring about her finger; it glittered like polished gold overlaid with silver light, and a white stone in it twinkled as if the Even-star had come to rest upon her hand. Frodo gazed at the ring with awe; for suddenly it seemed to him that he understood.
      ‘Yes,’ she said, divining his thought, ‘it is not permitted to speak of it, and Elrond could not do so. But it cannot be hidden from the Ring-Bearer, and one who has seen the Eye. Verily it is in the land of Lórien upon the finger of Galadriel that one of the Three remains. This is Nenya, the Ring of Adamant, and I am its keeper.’ ”

— J. R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

Related material:

The last 3 entries,
as well as
Mathematics and Narrative

“How much story
do you want?”
— George Balanchine  

Sunday, March 26, 2006

Sunday March 26, 2006

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:00 PM

Rhinestone Cowboy

By GREG RISLING
Associated Press Writer

LOS ANGELES — Singer Buck Owens, the flashy rhinestone cowboy who shaped the sound of country music… died Saturday. He was 76.

From Log24, Feb. 2, 2003:

Head White House speechwriter Michael Gerson:

“In the last two weeks, I’ve been returning to Hopkins.  Even in the ‘world’s wildfire,’ he asserts that ‘this Jack, joke, poor potsherd, patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,/Is immortal diamond.’ A comfort.”

— Vanity Fair, May 2002, page 162

Related material:

See the five Log24 entries ending with The Diamond as Big as the Monster (Dec. 21, 2005).

Note particularly the following:

From Fitzgerald’s
The Diamond as Big as the Ritz:

    “Now,” said John eagerly, “turn out your pocket and let’s see what jewels you brought along. If you made a good selection we three ought to live comfortably all the rest of our lives.”
     Obediently Kismine put her hand in her pocket and tossed two handfuls of glittering stones before him.
    “Not so bad,” cried John, enthusiastically. “They aren’t very big, but– Hello!” His expression changed as he held one of them up to the declining sun. “Why, these aren’t diamonds! There’s something the matter!”
    “By golly!” exclaimed Kismine, with a startled look. “What an idiot I am!”
    “Why, these are rhinestones!” cried John.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051123-Star.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051221-Reba1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Wednesday, December 21, 2005

Wednesday December 21, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:07 PM
For the feast of
St. Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald

The Diamond
as Big as
the Monster

From Fitzgerald’s The Diamond as Big as the Ritz:

    “Now,” said John eagerly, “turn out your pocket and let’s see what jewels you brought along. If you made a good selection we three ought to live comfortably all the rest of our lives.”
     Obediently Kismine put her hand in her pocket and tossed two handfuls of glittering stones before him.
    “Not so bad,” cried John, enthusiastically. “They aren’t very big, but– Hello!” His expression changed as he held one of them up to the declining sun. “Why, these aren’t diamonds! There’s something the matter!”
    “By golly!” exclaimed Kismine, with a startled look. “What an idiot I am!”
    “Why, these are rhinestones!” cried John.

From The Hawkline Monster, by Richard Brautigan:
 
    “What are we going to do now?” Susan Hawkline said, surveying the lake that had once been their house.
    Cameron counted the diamonds in his hand.  There were thirty-five diamonds and they were all that was left of the Hawkline Monster.
    “We’ll think of something,” Cameron said.

Related material:

“A disciple of Ezra Pound, he adapts to the short story the ideogrammatic method of The Cantos, where a grammar of images, emblems, and symbols replaces that of logical sequence. This grammar allows for the grafting of particulars into a congeries of implied relation without subordination. In contrast to postmodernists, Davenport does not omit causal connection and linear narrative continuity for the sake of an aleatory play of signification but in order to intimate by combinational logic kinships and correspondences among eras, ideas and forces.”

When Novelists Become Cubists:
    The Prose Ideograms of Guy Davenport,
    by Andre Furlani

“T.S. Eliot’s experiments in ideogrammatic method are equally germane to Davenport, who shares with the poet an avant-garde aesthetic and a conservative temperament.  Davenport’s text reverberates with echoes of Four Quartets.”

Andre Furlani

“At the still point,
  there the dance is.”

—  T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets,
quoted in the epigraph to
the chapter on automorphism groups
in Parallelisms of Complete Designs,
by Peter J. Cameron,
published when Cameron was at
Merton College, Oxford.

“As Gatsby closed the door of
‘the Merton College Library’
I could have sworn I heard
the owl-eyed man
break into ghostly laughter.”

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Sunday, December 18, 2005

Sunday December 18, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:11 AM

The Meadow

“Heaven– Where Is It?
  How Do We Get There?”

To air on ABC
Tuesday, Dec. 20
(John Spencer’s birthday)

By Trevanian, who died on
Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2005:

From
 Shibumi

“Well… the flow of the play was just right, and it began to bring me to the meadow. It always begins with some kind of flowing motion… a stream or river, maybe the wind making waves in a field of ripe rice, the glitter of leaves moving in a breeze, clouds flowing by. And for me, if the structure of the Go stones is flowing classically, that too can bring me to the meadow.”

“The meadow?”

“Yes. That’s the place I expand into. It’s how I recognize that I am resting.”

“Is it a real meadow?”

“Yes, of course.”

“A meadow you visited at one time? A place in your memory?”

“It’s not in my memory. I’ve never been there when I was diminished.”

“Diminished?”

“You know… when I’m in my body and not resting.”

“You consider normal life to be a diminished state, then?”

“I consider time spent at rest to be normal. Time like this… temporary, and… yes, diminished.”

“Tell me about the meadow, Nikko.”

“It is triangular. And it slopes uphill, away from me. The grass is tall. There are no animals. Nothing has ever walked on the grass or eaten it. There are flowers, a breeze… warm. Pale sky. I’m always glad to be the grass again.”

“You are the grass?”

“We are one another. Like the breeze, and the yellow sunlight. We’re all… mixed in together.”

“I see. I see. Your description of the mystic experience resembles others I have read. And this meadow is what the writers call your ‘gateway’ or ‘path.’ Do you ever think of it in those terms?”

“No.”

“So. What happens then?”

“Nothing. I am at rest. I am everywhere at once. And everything is unimportant and delightful. And then… I begin to diminish. I separate from the sunlight and the meadow, and I contract again back into my bodyself. And the rest is over.” Nicholai smiled uncertainly. “I suppose I am not describing it very well, Teacher. It’s not… the kind of thing one describes.”

“No, you describe it very well, Nikko. You have evoked a memory in me that I had almost lost. Once or twice when I was a child… in summer, I think… I experienced brief transports such as you describe. I read once that most people have occasional mystic experiences when they are children, but soon outgrow them. And forget them….”

“And we may see
the meadow in December,
icy white and crystalline.”

— Johnny Mercer,
  “Midnight Sun

Sunday, October 9, 2005

Sunday October 9, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:00 AM
Today’s Sermon:
Magical Thinking

On this date– “In 1936,
the first generator at Boulder
(later Hoover) Dam began
transmitting electricity to Los Angeles.”
— Today in History, Associated Press

“Brightness doubled
   generates radiance.”
— Hexagram 30

“I know what nothing means.”
— Maria Wyeth in Play It As It Lays

“Nothing is random.”
— Mark Helprin in Winter’s Tale

Maria Wyeth in Las Vegas:

“… She thought about nothing.  Her mind was a blank tape, imprinted daily with snatches of things overheard, fragments of dealers’ patter, the beginnings of jokes and odd lines of song lyrics.  When she finally lay down nights in the purple room she would play back the day’s tape, a girl singing into a microphone and a fat man dropping a glass, cards fanned on a table and a dealer’s rake in closeup and a woman in slacks crying and the opaque blue eyes of the guard at some baccarat table.  A child in the harsh light of a crosswalk on the Strip.  A sign on Fremont Street.  A light blinking.  In her half sleep the point was ten, the jackpot was on eighteen, the only man that could ever reach her was the son of a preacher man, someone was down sixty, someone was up, Daddy wants a popper and she rode a painted pony let the spinning wheel spin.

By the end of a week she was thinking constantly about where her body stopped and the air began, about the exact point in space and time that was the difference between Maria and other.  She had the sense that if she could get that in her mind and hold it for even one micro-second she would have what she had come to get.  As if she had fever, her skin burned and crackled with a pinpoint sensitivity.  She could feel smoke against her skin.  She could feel voice waves.  She was beginning to feel color, light intensities, and she imagined that she could be put blindfolded in front of the signs at the Thunderbird and the Flamingo and know which was which.  ‘Maria,’ she felt someone whisper one night, but when she turned there was nobody.

She began to feel the pressure of Hoover Dam, there on the desert, began to feel the pressure and pull of the water.  When the pressure got great enough she drove out there.  All that day she felt the power  surging through her own body. All day she was faint with vertigo, sunk in a world where great power grids converged, throbbing lines plunged finally into the shallow canyon below the dam’s face, elevators like coffins dropped into the bowels of the earth itself.  With a guide and a handful of children Maria walked through the chambers, stared at the turbines in the vast glittering gallery, at the deep still water with the hidden intakes sucking all the while, even as she watched, clung to the railings, leaned out, stood finally on a platform over the pipe that carried the river beneath the dam.  The platform quivered.  Her ears roared.  She wanted to stay in the dam, lie on the great pipe itself, but reticence saved her from asking.

‘Just how long have you been here now,’ Freddy Chaikin asked when she ran into him in Caesar’s.  ‘You planning on making a year of it?  Or what?'”

Related material

The front page of today’s
New York Times Book Review

and Log24, July 15, 2004:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/040715-Pit2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

A quotation that somehow
seems relevant:

O the mind, mind has mountains,
   cliffs of fall
Frightful, sheer, no-man fathomed.
   Hold them cheap
May who ne’er hung there.

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Sunday, May 22, 2005

Sunday May 22, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:25 PM
The Shining
of Friday the 13th

From Margalit Fox in today’s New York Times:

“Eddie Barclay, who for three decades after World War II was arguably the most powerful music mogul in Europe and inarguably the most flamboyant, died on [Friday] May 13 in Paris. He was 84….

… Mr. Barclay was best known for three things: popularizing American jazz in France in the postwar years; keeping the traditional French chanson alive into the age of rock ‘n’ roll; and presiding over parties so lavish that they were considered just the tiniest bit excessive even by the standards of the French Riviera….

Among the guests at some of his glittering parties… Jack Nicholson….”

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050522-Jack.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material:

“Joyce’s confidant in Zurich in 1918, Frank Budgen, luckily for us described the process of writing Ulysses…. ‘Not Bloom, not Stephen is here the principal personage, but Dublin itself… All towns are labyrinths…’  While working… Joyce bought a game called Labyrinth, which he played every evening for a time with his daughter, Lucia. From this game he cataloged the six main errors of judgment into which one might fall in seeking a way out of a maze.”

quoted by Bruce Graham from The Creators by Daniel Boorstin

“We’ll always have Paris.”

An Invariant Feast, Log24, Sept. 6, 2004

Tuesday, March 29, 2005

Tuesday March 29, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 4:01 PM
 

continued

The stranglehold of the Wiener Kreis on Harvard philosophy may at last be breaking:

"… imagination and belief are related….  belief presupposes imagination…."

"To negate the actual is to move imaginatively into the realm of modality.  Logic is all about the entertaining of possibilities."

"… imagination is central to an account of linguistic understanding. To understand a sentence is to imaginatively grasp the possibility it represents."

— Colin McGinn, excerpt (pdf) from Mindsight: Image, Dream, Meaning, published by Harvard University Press on November 22, 2004

From November 22, 2004:

Photo by Gerry Gantt

From Four Quartets:

And the pool was filled
with water out of sunlight,
And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
The surface glittered out of heart of light…

Monday, November 22, 2004

Monday November 22, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:12 PM
 
Flores, Flores Para Los Muertos

See entry of
All Hallows' Eve:

"A memorial Mass will be held on Monday,
November 22, 2004, at the Church of
St. Ignatius Loyola, 980 Park Avenue…."

Photo by Gerry Gantt

From Four Quartets:

And the pool was filled
with water out of sunlight,
And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
The surface glittered out of heart of light…

Related reading:

From a review at Amazon.com
of All Hallows' Eve, by Charles Williams:

"How many other books do you know in which one of the two main characters is dead, in which the dead and living can communicate almost as easily as we do every day, in which magic is serious and scary? Mainstream books, that is, not Goosebumps, with an introduction by T.S. Eliot, with the whole thing to be understood as at least feasible if not truth. This is unusual. And yet, and yet, the whole thing works."

Wednesday, September 29, 2004

Wednesday September 29, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 AM

Romantic Interaction,
continued

(See parts 1, 2, 3, 4)

From Karl Iagnemma:

From Log24.net, March 3, 2004:

"No se puede vivir sin amar."

— Malcolm Lowry,
Under the Volcano

Photo by Gerry Gantt

From Four Quartets:

And the pool was filled with water out of sunlight,
And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
The surface glittered out of heart of light….

Tuesday, September 28, 2004

Tuesday September 28, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:33 PM

3:33:33 PM

Romantic Interaction, continued…

The Rhyme of Time

From American Dante Bibliography for 1983:

Freccero, John. "Paradiso X: The Dance of the Stars" (1968). Reprinted in Dante in America … (q.v.), pp. 345-371. [1983]

Freccero, John. "The Significance of terza rima." In Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio: Studies in the Italian Trecento … (q.v.), pp. 3-17. [1983]

Interprets the meaning of terza rima in terms of a temporal pattern of past, present, and future, with which the formal structure and the thematics of the whole poem coordinate homologically: "both the verse pattern and the theme proceed by a forward motion which is at the same time recapitulary." Following the same pattern in the three conceptual orders of the formal, thematical, and logical, the autobiographical narrative too is seen "as forward motion that moves towards its own beginning, or as a form of advance and recovery, leading toward a final recapitulation." And the same pattern is found especially to obtain theologically and biblically (i.e., historically). By way of recapitulation, the author concludes with a passage from Augustine's Confessions on the nature of time, which "conforms exactly to the movement of terza rima." Comes with six diagrams illustrating the various patterns elaborated in the text.

From Rachel Jacoff's review of Pinsky's translation of Dante's Inferno:

"John Freccero's Introduction to the translation distills a compelling reading of the Inferno into a few powerful and immediately intelligible pages that make it clear why Freccero is not only a great Dante scholar, but a legendary teacher of the poem as well."

From The Undivine Comedy, Ch. 2, by Teodolinda Barolini (Princeton University Press, 1992):

"… we exist in time which, according to Aristotle, "is a kind of middle-point, uniting in itself both a beginning and an end, a beginning of future time and an end of past time."* It is further to say that we exist in history, a middleness that, according to Kermode, men try to mitigate by making "fictive concords with origins and ends, such as give meaning to lives and to poems." Time and history are the media Dante invokes to begin a text whose narrative journey will strive to imitate– not escape– the journey it undertakes to represent, "il cammin di nostra vita."

* Aristotle is actually referring to the moment, which he considers indistinguishable from time: "Now since time cannot exist and is unthinkable apart from the moment, and the moment is a kind of middle-point, uniting as it does in itself both a beginning and an end, a beginning of future time and an end of past time, it follows that there must always be time: for the extremity of the last period of time that we take must be found in some moment, since time contains no point of contact for us except in the moment. Therefore, since the moment is both a beginning and an end there must always be time on both sides of it" (Physics 8.1.251b18-26; in the translation of R. P. Hardie and R. K. Gaye, in The Basic Works of Aristotle, ed. Richard McKeon [New York: Random House, 1941]).  

From Four Quartets:

And the pool was filled with water out of sunlight,
And the lotos rose, quietly, quietly,
The surface glittered out of heart of light,
And they were behind us, reflected in the pool.
Then a cloud passed, and the pool was empty.
Go, said the bird, for the leaves were full of children,
Hidden excitedly, containing laughter.
Go, go, go, said the bird: human kind
Cannot bear very much reality.
Time past and time future
What might have been and what has been
Point to one end, which is always present.

Monday, July 26, 2004

Monday July 26, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 7:20 PM

Happy Birthday,
Carl Jung


 

Jung in Von Franz's
Psyche and Matter, p. 85:


"What the formula can only hint at is the higher plane that is reached through the process of transformation…. The change consists in an unfolding of totality into four parts four times, which means nothing less than its becoming conscious."



Jung's Model
of the Self:

 
Four Quartets:

"… history is a pattern      
Of timeless moments."

Cold Mountain, the film:

Inman: You are all that keeps me from sliding into some dark place.
Ada: But how did I keep you? We barely knew each other. A few moments.
Inman: A thousand moments. They're like a bag of tiny diamonds glittering in a black heart.

Friday, March 28, 2003

Friday March 28, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:16 AM

Bright Star

From a Spanish-English dictionary:

lucero m. morning or evening star: any bright star….

 Today is Reba McEntire’s birthday.

” ‘I know what it is you last saw,’ she said; ‘for that is also in my mind. Do not be afraid! But do not think that only by singing amid the trees, nor even by the slender arrows of elven-bows, is this land of Lothlórien maintained and defended against the Enemy. I say to you, Frodo, that even as I speak to you, I perceive the Dark Lord and know his mind, or all his mind that concerns the Elves. And he gropes ever to see me and my thought. But still the door is closed!’

      She lifted up her white arms, and spread out her hands towards the East in a gesture of rejection and denial. Eärendil, the Evening Star, most beloved of the Elves, shone clear above. So bright was it that the figure of the Elven-lady cast a dim shadow on the ground. Its ray glanced upon a ring about her finger; it glittered like polished gold overlaid with silver light, and a white stone in it twinkled as if the Even-star had come to rest upon her hand. Frodo gazed at the ring with awe; for suddenly it seemed to him that he understood. 

      ‘Yes’, she said, divining his thought, ‘it is not permitted to speak of it, and Elrond could not do so. But it cannot be hidden from the Ring-Bearer, and one who has seen the Eye. Verily it is in the land of Lórien upon the finger of Galadriel that one of the Three remains. This is Nenya, the Ring of Adamant, and I am its keeper.’ “

— J. R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

Related material on telepathy:

Shining Forth and Naturalized Epistemology

Related material on rings, and another musical Reba:

Leonard Gillman interview, Part I and Part II

Gillman, a pianist, is co-author of Rings of Continuous Functions.

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