Log24

Wednesday, March 29, 2006

Wednesday March 29, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 8:00 PM

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Note: Carmichael's reference is to
A. Emch, "Triple and multiple systems, their geometric configurations and groups," Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 31 (1929), 25–42.

"There is such a thing as a tesseract."
A Wrinkle in Time

Wednesday March 29, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM
Darkness at Noon,
continued

It turns out that Medawar (see previous entry) also wrote a deeply hostile review of Koestler’s The Act of Creation.  (See Pluto’s Republic.)

There are plenty more like Medawar, so it may be that a further effort at documentation of Diamond Theory is needed.  See this evening’s entry, to follow.

Tuesday, March 28, 2006

Tuesday March 28, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:00 PM
A Prince of Darkness


“What did he fear? It was not a fear or dread, It was a nothing that he knew too well. It was all a nothing and a man was a nothing too. It was only that and light was all it needed and a certain cleanness and order. Some lived in it and never felt it but he knew it all was nada y pues nada y nada y pues nada. Our nada who art in nada, nada be thy name thy kingdom nada thy will be nada in nada as it is in nada. Give us this nada our daily nada and nada us our nada as we nada our nadas and nada us not into nada but deliver us from nada; pues nada. Hail nothing full of nothing, nothing is with thee.”

— From Ernest Hemingway,
A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

“By groping toward the light
 we are made to realize
 how deep the darkness
 is around us.”
 
— Arthur Koestler,
   The Call Girls: A Tragi-Comedy,
   Random House, 1973,
   page 118

From a review of
Teilhard de Chardin’s
The Phenomenon of Man:

“It would have been
 a great disappointment
 to me if Vibration did not
 somewhere make itself felt,
 for all scientific mystics
 either vibrate in person
 or find themselves
 resonant with cosmic
 vibrations….”

Sir Peter Brian Medawar

“He’s good.”
“Good? He’s the fucking
Prince of Darkness!”

— Paul Newman
and Jack Warden
in “The Verdict

Sanskrit (transliterated) —

    nada:
 
 
  the universal sound, vibration.

“So Nada Brahma means not only:
 God the Creator is sound; but also
 (and above all), Creation,
 the cosmos, the world, is sound.
 And: Sound is the world.”

Joachim-Ernst Berendt,  
   author of Nada Brahma

 
“This book is the outcome of
a course given at Harvard
first by G. W. Mackey….”

— Lynn H. Loomis, 1953, preface to
An Introduction to
Abstract Harmonic Analysis

For more on Mackey and Harvard, see
the Log24 entries of March 14-17.

Monday, March 27, 2006

Monday March 27, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:17 AM

A Living Church

A skeptic’s remark:

“…the mind is an amazing thing and it can create patterns and interconnections among things all day if you let it, regardless of whether they are real connections.”

— Xanga blogger “sejanus”

A reply from G. K. Chesterton
(Log24, Jan. 18, 2004):

“Plato has told you a truth; but Plato is dead. Shakespeare has startled you with an image; but Shakespeare will not startle you with any more. But imagine what it would be to live with such men still living. To know that Plato might break out with an original lecture to-morrow, or that at any moment Shakespeare might shatter everything with a single song. The man who lives in contact with what he believes to be a living Church is a man always expecting to meet Plato and Shakespeare to-morrow at breakfast. He is always expecting to see some truth that he has never seen before.”

For Reba McEntire:

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Sunday’s lottery in the
State of Grace
(Kelly, of Philadelphia):

Mid-day: 024
Evening: 672

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A meditation on  
Sunday’s numbers —

From Log24, Jan. 8, 2005:

24

The Star
of Venus

“He looked at the fading light
in the western sky and saw Mercury,
or perhaps it was Venus,
gleaming at him as the evening star.
Darkness and light,
the old man thought.
It is what every hero legend is about.
The darkness which is more than death,
the light which is love, like our friend
Venus here….”

Roderick MacLeish, Prince Ombra

From Log24, Oct. 23, 2002:

An excerpt from
Robert A. Heinlein‘s
classic novel Glory Road

    “I have many names. What would you like to call me?”

    “Is one of them ‘Helen’?”

    She smiled like sunshine and I learned that she had dimples. She looked sixteen and in her first party dress. “You are very gracious. No, she’s not even a relative. That was many, many years ago.” Her face turned thoughtful. “Would you like to call me ‘Ettarre’?”

    “Is that one of your names?”

    “It is much like one of them, allowing for different spelling and accent. Or it could be ‘Esther’ just as closely. Or ‘Aster.’ Or even ‘Estrellita.’ ”

    ” ‘Aster,’ ” I repeated. “Star. Lucky Star!”

Related material:

672 Astarte and
The Venerable Bede
(born in 672).

672 illustrated:

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The Venerable Bede
and the Star of Venus

The 672 connection is, of course,
not a real connection
(in the sense of “sejanus” above)
but it is nevertheless
not without interest.

Postscript of 6 PM

A further note on the above
illustration of the 672 connection:

The late Buck Owens
(see previous entry for
Owens, Reba, and the
star of Venus)
once described
his TV series as
“a show of fat old men
and pretty young girls”
(today’s Washington Post).

A further note on
lottery hermeneutics:

Those who prefer to interpret
random numbers with the aid
of a dictionary
(as in Is Nothing Sacred?)
may be pleased to note that
“heehaw” occurs in Webster’s
New World Dictionary,
College Edition
, 1960,
on page 672.

In today’s Washington Post,
Richard Harrington informs us that
“As a child, Owens worked cotton and
  maize fields, taking the name Buck
from a well-liked mule….”

Hee. Haw.
 

Sunday, March 26, 2006

Sunday March 26, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:00 PM

Rhinestone Cowboy

By GREG RISLING
Associated Press Writer

LOS ANGELES — Singer Buck Owens, the flashy rhinestone cowboy who shaped the sound of country music… died Saturday. He was 76.

From Log24, Feb. 2, 2003:

Head White House speechwriter Michael Gerson:

“In the last two weeks, I’ve been returning to Hopkins.  Even in the ‘world’s wildfire,’ he asserts that ‘this Jack, joke, poor potsherd, patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,/Is immortal diamond.’ A comfort.”

— Vanity Fair, May 2002, page 162

Related material:

See the five Log24 entries ending with The Diamond as Big as the Monster (Dec. 21, 2005).

Note particularly the following:

From Fitzgerald’s
The Diamond as Big as the Ritz:

    “Now,” said John eagerly, “turn out your pocket and let’s see what jewels you brought along. If you made a good selection we three ought to live comfortably all the rest of our lives.”
     Obediently Kismine put her hand in her pocket and tossed two handfuls of glittering stones before him.
    “Not so bad,” cried John, enthusiastically. “They aren’t very big, but– Hello!” His expression changed as he held one of them up to the declining sun. “Why, these aren’t diamonds! There’s something the matter!”
    “By golly!” exclaimed Kismine, with a startled look. “What an idiot I am!”
    “Why, these are rhinestones!” cried John.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051123-Star.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051221-Reba1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Sunday March 26, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 PM
‘Nauts

(continued from
Life of the Party, March 24)

Exhibit A —

From (presumably) a Princeton student
(see Activity, March 24):

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Exhibit B —

From today’s Sunday comics:

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Exhibit C —

From a Smith student with the
same name as the Princeton student
(i.e., Dagwood’s “Twisterooni” twin):

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060326-Smith.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related illustrations
(“Visual Stimuli“) from
the Smith student’s game —

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060326-Psychonauts1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Literary Exercise:

Continuing the Smith student’s
Psychonauts theme,
compare and contrast
two novels dealing with
similar topics:

A Wrinkle in Time,
by the Christian author
Madeleine L’Engle,
and
Psychoshop,
by the secular authors
Alfred Bester and
Roger Zelazny.

Presumably the Princeton student
would prefer the Christian fantasy,
the Smith student the secular.

Those who prefer reality to fantasy —
not as numerous as one might think —
may examine what both 4×4 arrays
illustrated above have in common:
their structure.

Both Princeton and Smith might benefit
from an application of Plato’s dictum:

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Sunday March 26, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM
Midnight in the Garden
continued

Questions posed by
Roberta Smith in the
New York Times
of Jan. 13, 2006:

“‘What is art?’ may be the
art world’s most relentlessly asked
question. But a more pertinent one
right now is,  ‘What is an art gallery?'”

—  from “Who Needs a
White Cube These Days?

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060320-Masks.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

An example that may help:
London’s White Cube gallery
and its current Liza Lou exhibit,
which is said to convey
a palpable sense of use,
damage, lost time, lost lives
.”

See the previous entry for details.

On the brighter side, we have

Clint Eastwood on the
“Midnight in the Garden
of Good and Evil”
soundtrack CD

“Accentuate the positive”–

and an entry from last Christmas:

Compare and contrast:


(Click on pictures
for details.)


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The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/EightfoldWayCover.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“Recollect what I have said to you,
that this world is a comedy
to those who think,
a tragedy to those who feel.
This is the quint-essence of all
I have learnt in fifty years!”

Horace Walpole,
  letter to Horace Mann,
5 March, 1772

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