Log24

Thursday, April 4, 2019

Expanding the Spielraum . . .

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:27 PM

Continues . . .

. . . with Stephen King.

Saturday, June 3, 2017

Expanding the Spielraum (Continued*)

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:13 PM

Or:  The Square

"What we do may be small, but it has
 a certain character of permanence."
— G. H. Hardy

* See Expanding the Spielraum in this journal.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Expanding the Spielraum

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:48 AM

Cézanne's Greetings.

"Cézanne ignores the laws of classical perspective . . . ."

— Voorhies, James. “Paul Cézanne (1839–1906).”
In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History .  New York:
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. (October 2004)

Some others do not.

This is what I called "the large Desargues configuration
in posts of April 2013 and later.

Sunday, December 11, 2016

Expanding the Spielraum

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 AM

(Continued)

Tony Stark's "little gray area" remark to Peter Parker 
in the previous post suggests an elementary calculation:

Compare to a remark from Wikipedia:

"This is the total area of
the 88 modern constellations 
in the sky."

— Wikipedia, Square degree

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Expanding the Spielraum

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:40 PM

Continues

Rubik cube in the heading of the homepage of the Notices of the American Mathematical Society

"My AMS invited address at the SIAM Annual Meeting July 11–15
in Boston discusses the extension of eigenvectors and singular
vectors from matrices to higher order tensors."

Bernd Sturmfels in the June-July 2016 AMS Notices

See also Sturmfels in this  journal — for instance, in
"Expanding the Spielraum," a post of Feb. 3, 2015 —

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Expanding the Spielraum

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:45 AM

(Continued)

The physicist Hendrik van Dam was mentioned in recent posts.

He reportedly died at 78 on February 11, 2013.

A post from that date, and a followup —

Monday, October 26, 2015

Expanding the Seagram Spielraum

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:20 PM

From the previous post, Expanding the Spielraum

"The knights and squires of nearby Ambras used to let their
steeds romp here, whence came the name Tummelplatz ." 

— Quelle: Ludwig von Hörmann, "Der Tummelplatz  bei Amras,"
in: Der Alpenfreund , 1. Band, Gera 1870, S. 72 – 73.

"Integrity, Craftsmanship, Tradition"

Expanding the Spielraum

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:00 PM

(Continued)

Halloween meditation  on  the Tummelplatz  at Innsbruck

"Die Ritter und Knappen des nahegelegenen Ambras
pflegten hier ihre Rosse zu tummeln, woher sich auch
der Name Tummelplatz  schreibt."

"The knights and squires of nearby Ambras used to let their
steeds romp here, whence came the name Tummelplatz ." 

— Quelle: Ludwig von Hörmann, "Der Tummelplatz  bei Amras,"
in: Der Alpenfreund , 1. Band, Gera 1870, S. 72 – 73.

See as well Sigmund Freud, Erinnern, Wiederholen und Durcharbeiten
(1914) —

"Wir eröffnen ihm die Übertragung als den Tummel­platz ,
auf dem ihm gestattet wird, sich in fast völliger Freiheit
zu entfalten, und auferlegt ist, uns alles vorzuführen,
was sich an pathogenen Trieben im Seelenleben des
Analysierten verborgen hat."

"We admit it into the transference as a playground
in which it is allowed to expand in almost complete freedom
and in which it is expected to display to us everything in the
way of pathogenic instincts that is hidden in the patient's mind."

This passage has been discussed by later psychotherapists,
notably Russell Meares.  Dr. Meares, working from a translation
that has "playground" for Freud's Tummelplatz , uses Spielraum  
in place of Freud's own word.

For related material in this  journal, see Expanding the Spielraum.
An illustration from that search —

IMAGE- Concepts of Space

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Expanding the Spielraum

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:25 PM

(Continued from Feb. 3, 2015)

IMAGE- Spielfeld (1982-83), by Wolf Barth

The above artist  Wolf Barth is not the same person
as the mathematician  Wolf Barth quoted in the 
previous post.  For further background on the artist, see
an article in Neue Zürcher Zeitung  from Nov. 15, 2013.

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Expanding the Spielraum

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:30 PM

Continues.

See also today's previous post and the new film "Beyond the Reach,"
filmed in northwest New Mexico —

IMAGE- Map of northwest New Mexico

Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Expanding the Spielraum

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

A short poem by several authors:

"The role of
the 16 singular points
on the Kummer surface
is now played by
the 64 singular points
on the Kummer threefold."

— From Remark 2.4 on page 9 of
"The Universal Kummer Threefold,"
by Qingchun Ren, Steven V Sam,
Gus Schrader, and Bernd Sturmfels,
http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.1229v3,
August 6, 2012 — June 12, 2013.

See also "Expanded Field" in this journal.

IMAGE- Concepts of Space

Illustration from "Sunday School," July 20, 2014.

Other Log24 background:  Kummer, Spielraum, Art Space.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Hausdorff’s Spielraum

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:45 AM

Continued from January 31, 2015 .

Deepening the Spielraum

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 AM

(A sequel to Expanding the Spielraum (Feb. 3, 2015))

"Knowledge, wisdom even, lies in depth, not extension."

Tim Parks in The New York Review of Books ,
     5 PM ET on June 26, 2015

See also Log24 posts on the following figure —

Diamond Theory version of 'The Square Inch Space' with yin-yang symbol for comparison

Friday, February 6, 2015

The Annotated Spielraum

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 AM

Comments on two sub-images from yesterday's
The Big Spielraum  (image, 1 MB) that may or
may not interest Emma Watson —

The Potter Sub-Image

This is from a link in a July 8, 2011, post:

The above "Childhood's End" link leads to
a midrash on the Harry Potter series:

"After pg. 759 in Harry Potter and the 
Deathly Hallows 
, my childhood ended."

The Carmichael Sub-Image

The number of the last page in the last Harry Potter
book is 759.  This number may, for those with
cabalistic tendencies, be interpreted as the
number 3*23*11 from a 1931 mathematics paper:

Thursday, February 5, 2015

The Big Spielraum

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:14 PM

From the Office for the Arts at Harvard:

Harvard Thinks Big VI

College Events Board

Location: Sanders Theatre, Memorial Hall,
45 Quincy Street, Cambridge
Parking: none

On Sale Date: 1/29/2015
How to get tickets: The Harvard Box Office
617-496-2222

Thursday 2/5 08:00 PM

Ticket Prices: Free. Harvard ID only.
2 tickets per person per ID.
Tickets valid until 7:45PM. 

Ticket Availability: Good 

The Harvard College Events Board presents Harvard Thinks Big VI, a night of big ideas and thinking beyond traditional boundaries. On Thursday February 5th at 8 pm in Sanders Theatre, 7 Harvard professors and lecturers will speak for ten minutes each to discuss a topic that intrigues and excites them. This annual event was first started in order to introduce the Harvard community to the fascinating research and developments from some of the greatest minds on campus. 

See as well The Big Spielraum  (1 MB).

Monday, February 2, 2015

Spielraum as Ω

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:29 PM
 

From "Origins of the Logical Theory of Probability: von Kries, Wittgenstein, Waismann," by Michael Heidelberger —

"Von Kries calls a range of objective possibilities of a hypothesis or event (under given laws) its Spielraum   (literally: play space), which can mean ‘room to move’, ‘leeway’, ‘latitude of choice’, ‘degree of freedom’ or ‘free play’ and ‘clearance’ – or even ‘scope’. John Maynard Keynes translated it as ‘field’, but the term ‘range’ has generally been adopted in English. Von Kries now holds that if numerical probability were to make any sense at all it must be through this concept of the Spielraum  . Von Kries’s theory is therefore called a ‘Spielraum  theory’ or ‘range theory of probability’."

— International Studies in the Philosophy of Science , Volume 15, Issue 2, 2001, pp. 177-188

See also the tag Points Omega
(Scroll down to January 11-12, 2015.)

Related material:

"Now, for example, in how far are
the six sides of a symmetric die
'equally possible' upon throwing?"

— From "The Natural-Range Conception
     of Probability," by Dr. Jacob Rosenthal,
     page 73 in Time, Chance, and
     Reduction: Philosophical Aspects of
     Statistical 
Mechanics , ed. by 
     Gerhard Ernst and Andreas Hüttemann, 
     Cambridge U. Press, 2010, pp. 71-90

Sunday, February 1, 2015

Spielraum III

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:30 PM

From today's Super Bowl Halftime:

Click for image in context.

See also Spielraum  in this journal.

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Spielraum II

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:45 PM

For those who prefer Heidegger to Hausdorff:

Spielraum

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:27 PM

From the concluding paragraph of a new book by
mathematician Michael Harris:

"A team of eminent scholars is completing a definitive
edition of Hausdorff’s collected works—'unique
in the annals of mathematical publishing'— with the
care befitting the literary figure he undoubtedly was….
he is honored as, perhaps, the first modern
mathematician to give a name to what we have been
calling the 'relaxed field'— he called it the
'Spielraum  of thought'— and as a mathematician
who never lost his sensitivity to his chosen field’s
problematic attractions while remaining fully aware that
every veil lifted only reveals another veil."

— Harris, Michael, Mathematics without Apologies:
Portrait of a Problematic Vocation  
(2015-01-18) 
(pp. 324-325). Princeton U. Press. Kindle Edition. 

Related material:  Spiel ist nicht Spielerei .

Monday, March 16, 2020

Mathematics and Narrative* Continues:

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:27 AM

Expanding the Spielraum

Mathematics:  See Tetrahedron vs. Square in this journal
(Notes on two different models of schoolgirl space ).

Narrative:  Replacing the square  from the above posts by
a related cube 

… yields a merchandising inspiration

Dueling Holocrons: 

Jedi Cube vs. Sith Tetrahedron

.

* See also earlier posts on Mathematics and Narrative.

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Poster Boy

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 PM

Cover of 'The Institute,' a novel by Stephen King
                                                          Cover Design: Will Staehle / Unusual Co.

This post is in memory of "Wes Wilson, Psychedelic Poster Pioneer,"
who died at 82 on January 24, according to the NY Times  today. 
Related material — This  journal on January 24.

Friday, April 5, 2019

A Definite Field

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:45 AM

"We render the compulsion harmless, and indeed useful,
by giving it the right to assert itself in a definite field.
We admit it into the transference as a playground…."

— Sigmund Freud, 1914, "Remembering, Repeating,
and Working-Through" (See "Expanding the Spielraum,"
Oct. 26, 2015, in this  journal.)

An indefinite field —


A definite field —

A circular I Ching

Monday, October 22, 2018

Story Space

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:48 PM

A better term than "phase space" might be "story space."

See as well Expanding the Spielraum.

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Maori Chess

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:44 PM

The Decepticons  date above, June 21, 2017, suggests an instance of
that date in this journal —

For the Church of Synchronology, a New York Times  item from  
the above death date, June 21, 2017 —

See as well Kurt Russell in Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2

Some relevant context:  Expanding the Spielraum .

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Sequel to “The Square”* —

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:03 PM

The Cube

CodePen logo, pictured here on May 28, 2017

From YouTube, "The Cube," published on April 6, 2016

Meanwhile, also on April 6, 2016, at 2:01 AM ET 

* See The Pinterest Directive and Expanding the Spielraum.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Point 8777*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:42 PM

Or:  Expanding the Spielraum, continued

Wikipedia on author Michael Connelly

Connelly had planned on following his father’s early choice of
career in building construction and started out at the 
University of Florida in Gainesville as a building construction major.
After earning grades that were lower than expected, Connelly went
to see Robert Altman’s film The Long Goodbye (1973) and was
enchanted by what he saw. The film, based on Raymond Chandler’s 
1953 novel of the same name, inspired Connelly to want to become
a mystery writer. Connelly went home and read all of Chandler's
works featuring Philip Marlowe, a detective in Los Angeles during
the 1940s and ‘50s, and decided to switch majors to journalism with
a minor in creative writing.[4] He was a student of Harry Crews.

[See also

https://blogs.wsj.com/speakeasy/2012/11/24/
the-teacher-michael-connelly-never-forgot/
.]

A 2002 novel by Connelly — City of Bones .

Two scenes from a 2014 TV pilot based on the 2002 novel —

The "Bosch" pilot does not state the address, but its location in the
Hollywood Hills suggests a review of Heinlein Lottery in this journal. 

"Bonedigger Bonedigger
 Dogs in the moonlight"
 — Paul Simon

* Title suggested by that of the previous post, "Point Zero."

Friday, June 3, 2016

Bruins and van Dam

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:00 AM

A review of some recent posts on Dirac and geometry,
each of which mentions the late physicist Hendrik van Dam:

The first of these posts mentions the work of E. M. Bruins.
Some earlier posts that cite Bruins:

Sunday, November 1, 2015

Transitions

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:48 PM

Two transitions from last Monday, Oct. 26, 2015,
according to the online New York Times  today —

Leo P. Kadanoff, a physicist who provided critical insights into the transformations of matter from one state to another, died last Monday in Chicago. He was 78.

The cause was respiratory failure, said the University of Chicago, where he was a professor from 1978 until his retirement in 2003.

A member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he received the National Medal of Science in 1999.

“He won basically every prize except the Nobel Prize, and many people thought he should have won the Nobel,” said Emil Martinec, a physics professor at the University of Chicago who directs the university’s Kadanoff Center for Theoretical Physics.

Dr. Kadanoff’s biggest scientific contribution came in the 1960s as scientists were trying to understand phase transitions, when matter changes from one form to another.

A Cornell chemist, Benjamin Widom, had come up with mathematical relationships that described behavior associated with second-order phase transitions, which include the boiling of water to steam at a particular temperature and pressure. But Dr. Widom did not have an underlying physical explanation for why these relationships existed.

Willis Carto, a reclusive behind-the-scenes wizard of the far-right fringe of American politics who used lobbying and publishing to denigrate Jews and other minorities and galvanize the movement to deny the Holocaust, died last Monday at his home in Virginia. He was 89.

His death was announced by The American Free Press, a newspaper he helped found.

Mr. Carto raised funds to finance a right-wing military dictatorship in the United States, campaigned to persuade blacks to voluntarily return to Africa and, most influentially, started newsletters, a journal and conferences of academics and others to deny the scale, and even the existence, of the Holocaust.

The Anti-Defamation League called him “one of the most influential American anti-Semitic propagandists” and “the mastermind of the hate network.”

His associates included neo-Nazis, Christian vigilantes, John Birch Society members and Ku Klux Klansmen, and his extreme views alienated mainstream conservatives. After William F. Buckley sued Mr. Carto for libel and won in 1985, Mr. Buckley said Mr. Carto epitomized “the fever swamps of the crazed right.’’

Related remarks:

Posts tagged "Steam," the post "On Ice-Breaking" from Oct. 27,
the post "Expanding the Seagram Spielraum" from Oct. 26, and
a 2008 article on the subject of the obituary at right above.

"Integrity, Craftsmanship, Tradition"

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Meditation on an Icon

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:01 AM

IMAGE- Brian Bard on 'Heidegger's Reading of Heraclitus'

See also Legespiel  in this journal.

Saturday, April 18, 2015

The Southwest Furthers

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:01 PM

See Southwest + Furthers in this journal.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110413-Compass.jpg

The Acme Corporation Presents…

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:45 AM

Kyle Smith on April 15 in the New York Post —

"The ludicrous action thriller 'Beyond the Reach'
fails to achieve the Southwestern noir potency
of 'No Country for Old Men,' but there’s no denying
it brings to mind another Southwestern classic
about malicious pursuit: the Road Runner cartoons."

Related material: 

  1. Legespiel  Meets Würfelspiel  in…
    Gift of the Third Kind
    (April 7, 2007), featuring Ellen Yi-Luen Do —

    Reinventing Froebel's Gifts

  2. the current home page of Ellen Yi-Luen Do,
    now at Georgia Tech, and…
  3. a page about her ACME Lab —

Welcome to ACME lab!
A Creativity Machine Environment!
aka ACME Creativity Machine Environment –
ACME Lab

Yes, the name is both confusing and has
many meanings. We like the acronym of ACME,
since it means the highest point, and also refers to
the fictional company in Looney Tunes, which is
A Company that Makes Everything!

We call it ACME Creativity Machine Environment –
yes, the acronym of this is ACME.

We like recursive ideas.

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Elegy with Stars

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:00 PM

This evening's New York Times —

"William Thomas McKinley, a prolific American composer
whose music was infused with the jazz he had performed
since childhood, died on Feb. 3 at his home in Reading,
Mass. He was 76.

He died in his sleep, his son Elliott said."

"William Thomas McKinley: Elegy for Strings (2006)

[Elliott McKinley]  

137 views as of 9:45 PM ET Feb. 28, 2015

Published on Feb 11, 2015

Composed as an elegy and tribute for friends and family
that have passed, spurred by the passing of McKinley's
long time friend, drummer Roger Ryan. The performance
heard here is by the Seattle Symphony under the direction
of Gerard Schwarz. 

Photos by Elliott McKinley (Rho Ophiuchi nebula complex…
and the Pleiades…) shot at Cherry Springs State Park."

Related material from the date of McKinley's death —
Expanding the Spielraum.

Saturday, February 14, 2015

Valentine Dance

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:00 PM

For Eliot and von Franz —

"A dance results."

— Marie-Louise von Franz
     in Number and Time

IMAGE- Halftime dance in 4x4 square, 2015 Super Bowl, with Katy Perry

Monday, February 9, 2015

Overarching Symmetry

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Continued from earlier posts.

The Washington Post  online yesterday:

"Val Logsdon Fitch, the Nebraska rancher’s son who shared the Nobel Prize for detecting a breakdown in the overarching symmetry of physical laws, thus helping explain how the universe evolved after the Big Bang, died Feb. 5 in Princeton, N.J. He was 91.

His death was confirmed by Princeton University, where he had been a longtime faculty member and led the physics department for several years.

Dr. Fitch and his Princeton colleague James Cronin received the Nobel Prize in physics in 1980 for high-energy experiments conducted in 1964 that overturned fundamental assumptions about symmetries and invariances that are characteristic of the laws of physics."

— By Martin Weil

Fans of synchronicity may prefer some rather
ig -Nobel remarks quoted here  on the date
of Fitch's death:

"The Harvard College Events Board presents
Harvard Thinks Big VI, a night of big ideas
and thinking beyond traditional boundaries.
On Thursday February 5th at 8 pm in
Sanders Theatre …."

— Log24 post The Big Spielraum

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