Log24

Thursday, January 7, 2016

Point Omega…

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:32 AM

Continues. See previous episodes.

See as well

The above image is from April 7, 2003.

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Serial Box

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:20 PM

Enotes.com on Herman Wouk's 1985 novel Inside, Outside 

"The 'outside' of the title is the goyish world
into which David’s profession has drawn him;
the 'inside' is the warm life of his Russian-
Jewish family on which he, as narrator, reflects
in the course of the novel."

For a different sort of 'inside' life, see this morning's post
Gesamtkunstwerk , and Nathan Shields's Feb. 8, 2011,
tribute to a serial composer "In Memoriam, Milton Babbitt."
Some other context for Shields's musical remarks —

Doctor Faustus and Dürer Square.

For a more interesting contrast of inside with outside
that has nothing to do with ethnicity, see the Feb. 10,
2014, post Mystery Box III: Inside, Outside, about
the following box:

 .

Monday, October 14, 2013

Up and Down

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:29 AM

Heraclitus, Fragment 60 (Diels number):

The way up and the way down is one and the same.

ὁδὸς ἄνω κάτω μία καὶ ὡυτή

hodòs áno káto mía kaì houté

— http://www.heraclitusfragments.com/B60/index.html

IMAGE- Fetzer on ambiguity in Mann's 'Doctor Faustus'

See also Blade and Chalice and, for a less Faustian
approach, Universe of Discourse.

IMAGE- Logic related to 'the arsenal of algebraic analysis tools for fields'

Further context:  Not Theology.

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Plenitude

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 PM

In memory of Charles Rosen:

IMAGE- Herbert John Ryser, 'Combinatorial Mathematics' (1963), page 1

Related material:

The Magic Square in Doctor Faustus  (October 10th, 2012)

Elementary Finite Geometry (August 1st, 2012)

The Space of Horizons (August 7th, 2012)

Chromatic Plenitude (Rosen on Schoenberg)

IMAGE- Charles Rosen on 'a final demarcation of form'

Thursday, December 6, 2012

Magic Square

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:18 PM

This post was suggested by the December 4th death
of modernist composer Jonathan Harvey, 73,
and by Harvey's reflections on his 2007 opera
Wagner Dream .

For related reflections, see the Oct. 10 post on
the Dürer magic square in Mann's Doctor Faustus .

See also a December 2nd post on the Nov. 18 death of
chess grandmaster Elena Akhmilovskaya Donaldson.

IMAGE- Chess grandmaster and Dürer's angel with magic square
 

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Melancholia, Depression, Ambiguity

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 11:00 PM

Occurrences of the phrase "magic square" in Lowe-Porter's translation of the Thomas Mann novel Doctor Faustus

"On the wall above the  piano was an arithmetical diagram fastened with drawing-pins, something he had found in a second-hand shop: a so-called magic square, such as appears also in Dürer's Melancolia , along with the hour-glass, the circle, the scale, the polyhedron, and other symbols. Here as there, the figure was divided into sixteen Arabic-numbered fields, in such a way that number one was in the right-hand lower corner, sixteen in the upper left; and the magic, or the oddity, simply consisted in the fact that the sum of these numerals, however you added them, straight down, crosswise, or diagonally, always came to thirty-four. What the principle was upon which this magic uniformity rested I never made out, but by virtue of the prominent place Adrian had given it over the piano, it always attracted the eye, and I believe I never visited his room without giving a quick glance, slanting up or straight down and testing once more the invariable, incredible result."

….

"Adrian kept without changing during the whole four and a half years he spent in Leipzig his two-room quarters in Peterstrasse near the Collegium Beatae Virginis, where he had again pinned the magic square above his cottage piano."

….

" 'The decisive factor is that every note, without exception, has significance and function according to its place in the basic series or its derivatives. That would guarantee what I call the indifference to harmony and melody.' 

'A magic square,' I said. 'But do you hope to have people hear all that?' "

….

" 'Extraordinarily Dürerish. You love it. First "how will I shiver after the sun"; and then the houre-glasse of the Melancolia .  Is the magic square coming too?' "

….

"Here I will remind the reader of a conversation I had with Adrian on a long-ago day, the day of his sister's wedding at Buchel, as we walked round the Cow Trough. He developed for me— under pressure of a headache— his idea of the 'strict style,' derived from the way in which, as in the lied 'O lieb Madel, wie schlecht bist du ' melody and harmony are determined by the permutation of a fundamental five-note motif, the symbolic letters h, e, a, e, e-flat. He showed me the 'magic square' of a style of technique which yet developed the extreme of variety out of identical material and in which there is no longer anything unthematic, anything that could not prove itself to be a variation of an ever constant element. This style, this technique, he said, admitted no note, not one, which did not fulfil its thematic function in the whole structure— there was no longer any free note."

Review of related material— 

Last night's midnight post (disambiguation), the followup 1 AM post (ambiguation), today's noon post (ambiguity), and Dürer in this journal.

The tesseracts of the noon post are related to the Dürer magic square by a well-known adjacency property.

"… the once stable 'father's depression' has been transmuted into a shifting reality that shimmered in a multiplicity of facets."

Haim Omer, Tel-Aviv University, on Milanese ambiguation  therapy,
     p. 321 in "Three Styles of Constructive Therapy,"
     Constructive Therapies, Vol. 2 , pp. 319-333, 
     ed. by Michael F. Hoyt (Guilford Press paperback, 1998)

Subtitle for Odin’s Day

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The subtitle of Jack Kerouac's novel Doctor Sax
is Faust Part Three.

Related material—

Types of Ambiguity— Galois Meets Doctor Faustus
(this journal, December 14, 2010).

See also tesseracts of Odin and of Galois.

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Types of Ambiguity —

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:48 PM

Galois Meets Doctor Faustus

Galois's theory of mathematical  ambiguity (see June 14) —

  My principal meditations for some time have been directed towards
  the application of the theory of ambiguity to transcendental
  analysis.  It was a question of seeing a priori in a relation
  between quantities or transcendent functions, what exchanges one
  could make, which quantities one could substitute for the given
  quantities without the original relation ceasing to hold.  That
  immediately made clear the impossibility of finding many expressions
  that one could look for.  But I do not have time and my ideas are
  not yet well developed on this ground which is immense.

 — Evariste Galois, testamentary letter, translated by James Dolan

Thomas Mann on musical  ambiguity in his novel Doctor Faustus

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101214-FaustusAmbiguity.gif

Related material — Some context for the above and some remarks on the German original.

Thursday, October 12, 2006

Thursday October 12, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:31 AM
Miniature

This year’s winner of the
Nobel Prize in Literature
has written a novel that
  “uses the art of
miniature illumination,
much as Mann’s
Doctor Faustus
did music, to explore
a nation’s soul”
(John Updike in
The New Yorker).

For the explorer,
here is a
miniature story:

  The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060929-PAlottery.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
 
This story was published on
September 29, 2006,
the Feast of St. Michael
and All Angels
.

For illumination of the story,
see Log24, Sept. 30, 2006.

The author is unknown.


Wednesday, January 8, 2003

Wednesday January 8, 2003

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Into the Woods

From the Words on Film site:

"The proximal literary antecedents for Under the Volcano are Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy, especially The Inferno, on the one hand, and on the other, the Faust legend as embodied in the dramatic poem Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and the play Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe."

"In the opening page of the novel, we find the words "The Hotel Casino de la Selva stands on a slightly higher hill …" (Lowry, Volcano p. 3). "Selva" is one of the Spanish words for "woods." One of the cantinas in the novel is named El Bosque, and bosque is another Spanish word for "woods." The theme of being in a darkling woods is reiterated throughout the novel."

Literary Florence

Tonight's site music is "Children Will Listen,"
by Stephen Sondheim, from "Into the Woods."

Stephen Hawking is 61 today. 
An appropriate gift might be a cassette version of
The Screwtape Letters, by C. S. Lewis,
narrated by John Cleese. 

See also this review of Lewis's That Hideous Strength
and my entries of Dec. 31, 2002, and Jan. 4, 2003.   

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