Log24

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Dance, Music, Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 10:00 PM

". . . dance, fueled by music, opens up space."

—  Alastair Macaulay in the online New York Times  today

Putting aside the unfortunate fuel metaphor, this suggests a review —

A video published on the above date —

The video has six-plus-two dancers, a more concise arrangement
than the eight-plus-two discussed by Macaulay.

Another approach to six plus two:  the diamond-theorem correlation.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Fiat

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:23 PM
 
T. Lux Feininger (June 11, 1910 Berlin, Germany – July 7, 2011 Cambridge, Massachusetts) was a German-American painter, avant-garde photographer, author, and art teacher who was born in Berlin to Julia Berg and Lyonel Feininger, an American living in Germany from the age of sixteen. His father was appointed as the Master of the Printing Workingshop at the newly formed Bauhaus art school in Weimar by Walter Gropius in 1919.[1] He had two older full brothers, including Andreas Feininger . . . .  Wikipedia

The above passage was suggested by an IMDb release date

— and by a Log24 post, Lux, of the same date:  19 August, 2014.

See also photos by a big brother of Lux Feininger in this journal
on Wednesday, August 30, 2017.

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Text and Context

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 2:11 PM

Some context for the previous post, which was about
a new Art Space  Pinterest board

Sunday, October 4, 2015

Nicht Spielerei

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:31 PM

(Continued)

Review of a post from August 29th last year:

Friday, June 12, 2015

Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:37 PM

Was ist Raum, wie können wir ihn
erfassen und gestalten?”

Walter Gropius,

The Theory and
Organization of the
Bauhaus
  (1923)

This post was suggested by the Bauhaus song
"Bela Lugosi's Dead" at the beginning of the
1983 Tony Scott classic "The Hunger."

Friday, August 29, 2014

Raum

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 AM

A possible answer to the 1923 question of Walter Gropius, "Was ist Raum?"—

See also yesterday's Source of the Finite and the image search
on the Gropius question in last night's post.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Brutalism Revisited

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:59 PM

Yesterday's 11 AM post was a requiem for a brutalist architect.

Today's LA Times  has a related obituary:

"Architectural historian Alan Hess, who has written several books on
Mid-Century Modern design, said Meyer didn't have a signature style,
'which is one reason he is not as well-known as some other architects
of the period. But whatever style he was working in, he brought a real
sense of quality to his buildings.'

A notable example is another bank building, at South Beverly Drive
and Pico Boulevard, with massive concrete columns, a hallmark of
the New Brutalism style. 'This is a really good example of it,' Hess said."

— David Colker, 5:43 PM LA time, Aug. 28, 2014

A related search, suggested by this morning's post Source of the Finite:

(Click to enlarge.)

Friday, April 11, 2014

Change Descends (continued)

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:16 AM

Tom Cruise at the Vatican in MI3

Other descents of change:

Sacred Space and Cube Descending.

Context— Last night’s post Change Arises,
on Walter Gropius, Wolfe’s “Silver Prince.”

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Change Arises (continued)

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 PM

In memory of Lucia Eames, who reportedly died
on April 1, 2014:

“… Walter Gropius was her professor ….”

See also in this journal Gropius and the April 1 posts.

Related material: “As a little child.”

Saturday, March 8, 2014

Conwell Heptads in Eastern Europe

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:07 AM

“Charting the Real Four-Qubit Pauli Group
via Ovoids of a Hyperbolic Quadric of PG(7,2),”
by Metod Saniga, Péter Lévay and Petr Pracna,
arXiv:1202.2973v2 [math-ph] 26 Jun 2012 —

P. 4— “It was found that +(5,2) (the Klein quadric)
has, up to isomorphism, a unique  one — also known,
after its discoverer, as a Conwell heptad  [18].
The set of 28 points lying off +(5,2) comprises
eight such heptads, any two having exactly one
point in common.”

P. 11— “This split reminds us of a similar split of
63 points of PG(5,2) into 35/28 points lying on/off
a Klein quadric +(5,2).”

[18] G. M. Conwell, Ann. Math. 11 (1910) 60–76

A similar split occurs in yesterday’s Kummer Varieties post.
See the 63 = 28 + 35 vectors of R8 discussed there.

For more about Conwell heptads, see The Klein Correspondence,
Penrose Space-Time, and a Finite Model
.

For my own remarks on the date of the above arXiv paper
by Saniga et. al., click on the image below —

Walter Gropius

Thursday, June 20, 2013

ART WARS: Chesterton Thursday

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 PM

The New York Times  philosophy column "The Stone"
last evening had an essay on art by a sarcastic anarchist,
one Crispin Sartwell

"… whole generations of art lovers have been
trained in modernist dogma, and arts institutions’
access to various forms of state or foundation
support depend on it completely. One goes to
the museum to gasp at stunning works of
incomparable, super-human genius by beings
who are infinitely more exalted and important
than the mere humans staring at their paintings.
That’s why ordinary people staring at a Picasso
(allegedly) experience a kind of transcendence
or re-articulation of their lives and world."

 Cubism Re-Articulated:

  Click image for some backstory.

(IMAGE: Walter Gropius and Froebel's Third Gift,
from a Google image search today)

Background: Cubism in this journal and
Pilate Goes to Kindergarten.

Related material: Chesterton + Thursday in this journal.

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Lines

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:09 PM

Today's New York Times  on a collector of Japanese art who died on December 8th—

In 1954, she made her first trip to Japan. The visit had been suggested by the architect Walter Gropius, whose disciple Benjamin Thompson was designing a modernist house for her in Oyster Bay, on Long Island.

Gropius, a titan of the Bauhaus school, was deeply influenced by the Japanese aesthetic and wanted her to experience its clean, spare lines firsthand.

See Dec. 8th in this  journal for the following clean, spare lines:


Japanese character
        for "field"

Related material: Looking Deeply and Field.

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Space Cadets

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

From this journal on June 19, 2012

Walter Gropius on space—

"Was ist Raum, wie können wir ihn
 erfassen und gestalten?"

Walter Gropius,

The Theory and
Organization of the
Bauhaus
  (1923)

A book published on the same date—
June 19, 2012:

IMAGE- 'The Cryptos Conundrum,' by Chase Brandon

"… what Chalmers called the convergence of coincidence
a force majeure of unrelated events that shaped one's life,
that perhaps defined the concept of life itself.
He believed in the power of that force."

The Cryptos Conundrum , by Chase Brandon

See also Chase Brandon in Sunday's Huffington Post .

"I wrote another book."
— Robert De Niro as Harlan Kane

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Looking Deeply

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:48 PM

Last night's post on The Trinity of Max Black  and the use of
the term "eightfold" by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute
at Berkeley suggest a review of an image from Sept. 22, 2011

IMAGE- Eightfold cube with detail of triskelion structure

The triskele  detail above echoes a Buddhist symbol found,
for instance, on the Internet in an ad for meditation supplies—

Related remarks

http://www.spencerart.ku.edu/about/dialogue/fdpt.shtml

Mary Dusenbury (Radcliffe '64)—

"… I think a textile, like any work of art, holds a tremendous amount of information— technical, material, historical, social, philosophical— but beyond that, many works of art are very beautiful and they speak to us on many layers— our intellect, our heart, our emotions. I've been going to museums since I was a very small child, thinking about what I saw, and going back to discover new things, to see pieces that spoke very deeply to me, to look at them again, and to find more and more meaning relevant to me in different ways and at different times of my life. …

… I think I would suggest to people that first of all they just look. Linger by pieces they find intriguing and beautiful, and look deeply. Then, if something interests them, we have tried to put a little information around the galleries to give a bit of history, a bit of context, for each piece. But the most important is just to look very deeply."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikaya_Buddhism

According to Robert Thurman, the term "Nikāya Buddhism" was coined by Professor Masatoshi Nagatomi of Harvard University, as a way to avoid the usage of the term Hinayana.[12] "Nikaya Buddhism" is thus an attempt to find a more neutral way of referring to Buddhists who follow one of the early Buddhist schools, and their practice.

12. The Emptiness That is Compassion:
An Essay on Buddhist Ethics, Robert A. F. Thurman, 1980
[Religious Traditions , Vol. 4 No. 2, Oct.-Nov. 1981, pp. 11-34]

http://dsal.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/philologic/getobject.pl?c.2:1:6.pali

Nikāya [Sk. nikāya, ni+kāya]
collection ("body") assemblage, class, group

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/नि

Sanskrit etymology for नि (ni)

From Proto-Indo-European *ni …

Prefix

नि (ni)

  • down
  • back
  • in, into

http://www.rigpawiki.org/index.php?title=Kaya

Kaya (Skt. kāya སྐུ་, Tib. ku Wyl. sku ) —
the Sanskrit word kaya literally means ‘body’
but can also signify dimension, field or basis.

སྐུ། (Wyl. sku ) n. Pron.: ku

structure, existentiality, founding stratum ▷HVG KBEU

gestalt ▷HVG LD

Note that The Trinity of Max Black  is a picture of  a set
i.e., of an "assemblage, class, group."

Note also the reference above to the word "gestalt."

"Was ist Raum, wie können wir ihn
erfassen und gestalten?"

Walter Gropius

Bright Black

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:12 AM

“‘In the dictionary next to [the] word “bright,” you should see Paula’s picture,’ he said. ‘She was super smart, with a sparkling wit. … She had a beautiful sense of style and color.'”

— Elinor J. Brecher in The Miami Herald  on June 8, quoting Palm Beach Post writer John Lantigua on the late art historian Paula Hays Harper

This  journal on the date of her death—

IMAGE- The Trinity of Max Black (a 3-set, with its eight subsets arranged in a Hasse diagram that is also a cube)

For some simpleminded commentary, see László Lovász on the cube space.

Some less simpleminded commentary—

Was ist Raum, wie können wir ihn
erfassen und gestalten?”

Walter Gropius,

The Theory and
Organization of the
Bauhaus
  (1923)

Monday, June 25, 2012

Design (continued)

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:28 AM

The New York Times  this morning reports the death
last Tuesday (June 19, 2012) in Boston
of Gerhard Kallman, a Brutalist architect
born in Berlin in 1915.

Some Log24 images from the date of his death

IMAGE- Log24 on June 19, 2012-Gropius and the North Face of Harvard Design

The above view shows the south side of Kirkland Street (at Quincy).

IMAGE- Map from http://www.map.harvard.edu/

A more appealing architectural image, from the other side
of Kirkland Street—

IMAGE- Adolphus Busch Hall, 29 Kirkland St., Cambridge, MA

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Design

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

The New York Times online front page last night

"Microsoft introduced its own tablet computer,
called Surface, illustrating the pressure
Apple's success has put on it to marry
software and hardware more tightly."

Commentary—

IMAGE- The Marriage of Heaven and Hell-- Swedenborg Chapel and the Harvard Graduate School of Design

Google Maps image

Related material

"Was ist Raum, wie können wir ihn
 erfassen und gestalten?"

Walter Gropius,

The Theory and
Organization of the
Bauhaus
  (1923)

Update of Feb. 3, 2013:
See also The Perception of Doors in this journal.

Saturday, July 5, 2003

Saturday July 5, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:21 PM

Elementary,
My Dear Gropius

“What is space, how can it be understood and given a form?”
— Walter Gropius

Stoicheia:

Stoicheia,” Elements, is the title of
Euclid’s treatise on geometry.

Stoicheia is apparently also related to a Greek verb meaning “march” or “walk.”

According to a website on St. Paul’s phrase ta stoicheia tou kosmou,” which might be translated

The Elements of the Cosmos,

“… the verbal form of the root stoicheo was used to mean, ‘to be in a line,’ ‘to march in rank and file.’ … The general meaning of the noun form (stoicheion) was ‘what belongs to a series.’ “

As noted in my previous entry, St. Paul used a form of stoicheo to say “let us also walk (stoichomen) by the Spirit.” (Galatians 5:25) The lunatic ravings* of Saul of Tarsus aside, the concepts of walking, of a spirit, and of elements may be combined if we imagine the ghost of Gropius strolling with the ghosts of Plato, Aristotle, and Euclid, and posing his question about space.  Their reply might be along the following lines:

Combining stoicheia with a peripatetic peripateia (i.e., Aristotelian plot twist), we have the following diagram of Aristotle’s four stoicheia (elements),

which in turn is related, by the “Plato’s diamond” figure in the monograph Diamond Theory, to the Stoicheia, or Elements, of Euclid.

Quod erat demonstrandum.

* A phrase in memory of the Paulist Norman J. O’Connor, the “jazz priest” who died on St. Peter’s day, Sunday, June 29, 2003.  Paulists are not, of course, entirely mad; the classic The Other Side of Silence: A Guide to Christian Meditation, by the Episcopal priest Morton Kelsey, was published by the Paulist Press.

Its cover (above), a different version of the four-elements theme, emphasizes the important Jungian concept of quaternity.  Jung is perhaps the best guide to the bizarre world of Christian symbolism.  It is perhaps ironic, although just, that the Paulist Fathers should distribute a picture of “ta stoicheia tou kosmou,” the concept that St. Paul himself railed against.

The above book by Kelsey should not be confused with another The Other Side of Silence, a work on gay history, although confusion would be understandable in light of recent ecclesiastical revelations.

Let us pray that if there is a heaven, Father O’Connor encounters there his fellow music enthusiast Cole Porter rather than the obnoxious Saul of Tarsus.

Saturday July 5, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:44 PM

He Walks With Me

“Bonus question of the night (what Chris Culter would call the ‘Person of the Day’ award): Can anyone tell me, without looking it up (don’t cheat, seriously, I want to know), what the word ‘peripatetic’ means?”

EmilyMuse, 11:24 PM July 4, 2003 

See EmilyMuse’s site for my answer.  Her reply on July 5: “Person of the Day is you!”

My response:

More Boring Details
of Greek Etymology

Thank you for your comment.

From a website on theology:

“By the fourth century B.C, the verbal form of the root stoicheo was used to mean, ‘to be in a line,’ ‘to march in rank and file.’ The New Testament usage of the verb stoicheo retains an element of this usage in the five times that it is used.* The general meaning of the noun form (stoicheion) was ‘what belongs to a series.’ “

*For instance, “If we live by the Spirit, let us also walk (stoichomen) by the Spirit,” Galatians 5:25.

These remarks, together with my July 5 entry “Elements,” which contains the (implied) Eagles’ verse “We haven’t had that spirit here since 1969,” suggest that not I, but Walter Gropius, should be today’s Person of the Day.  

Documentation of my answer to Emily, “walking around,” from the site Aristotle:

“Aristotle’s school, his philosophy, and his followers were called peripatetic, which in Greek means ‘walking around,’ because Aristotle taught walking with his students.”

Saturday July 5, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 4:17 AM

Elements

In memory of Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus and head of the Harvard Graduate School of DesignGropius died on this date in 1969.  He said that

"The objective of all creative effort in the visual arts is to give form to space. … But what is space, how can it be understood and given a form?"

"Alle bildnerische Arbeit will Raum gestalten. … Was ist Raum, wie können wir ihn erfassen und gestalten?"


Gropius

— "The Theory and Organization
of the Bauhaus
" (1923)

I designed the following logo for my Diamond Theory site early this morning before reading in a calendar that today is the date of Gropius's death.  Hence the above quote.

"And still those voices are calling
from far away…"
— The Eagles
 

Stoicheia:

("Stoicheia," Elements, is the title of
Euclid's treatise on geometry.)

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