Log24

Saturday, August 27, 2016

Incarnation

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:06 AM

See a search for the title in this journal.

Related material:

The incarnation of three permutations,
named A, B, and C,
on the 7-set of digits {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7}
as  permutations on the eightfold cube.

See Minimal ABC Art, a post of August 22, 2016.

Monday, August 22, 2016

Minimal ABC Art

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 PM

Two portions of a post from Guy Fawkes Day 2015

 

Other art for Guy Fawkes Day

Cloak and Dagger

Thursday, November 5, 2015

ABC Art or: Guitart Solo

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 5:55 PM

"… the A B C of being…." — Wallace Stevens

Scholia —

Compare to my own later note, from March 4, 2010 —

"It seems that Guitart discovered these 'A, B, C' generators first,
though he did not display them in their natural setting,
the eightfold cube." — Borromean Generators (Log24, Oct. 19)

See also Raiders of the Lost Crucible (Halloween 2015)
and "Guitar Solo" from the 2015 CMA Awards on ABC.

Monday, October 19, 2015

Borromean Generators

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 4:10 AM

From slides dated June 28, 2008

Compare to my own later note, from March 4, 2010 —

It seems that Guitart discovered these "A, B, C" generators first,
though he did not display them in their natural setting,
the eightfold cube.

Some context: The epigraph to my webpage
"A Simple Reflection Group of Order 168" —

"Let G  be a finite, primitive subgroup of GL(V) = GL(n,D) ,
where  is an n-dimensional vector space over the
division ring D . Assume that G  is generated by 'nice'
transformations. The problem is then to try to determine
(up to GL(V) -conjugacy) all possibilities for G . Of course,
this problem is very vague. But it is a classical one,
going back 150 years, and yet very much alive today."

— William M. Kantor, "Generation of Linear Groups,"
pp. 497-509 in The Geometric Vein: The Coxeter Festschrift ,
published by Springer, 1981 

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Raiders of the Lost Articulation

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 6:14 PM

Tom Hanks as Indiana Langdon in Raiders of the Lost Articulation :

An unarticulated (but colored) cube:

Robert Langdon (played by Tom Hanks) and a corner of Solomon's Cube

A 2x2x2 articulated cube:

IMAGE- Eightfold cube with detail of triskelion structure

A 4x4x4 articulated cube built from subcubes like
the one viewed by Tom Hanks above:

Image-- Solomon's Cube

Solomon’s Cube

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Looking Deeply

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:48 PM

Last night's post on The Trinity of Max Black  and the use of
the term "eightfold" by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute
at Berkeley suggest a review of an image from Sept. 22, 2011

IMAGE- Eightfold cube with detail of triskelion structure

The triskele  detail above echoes a Buddhist symbol found,
for instance, on the Internet in an ad for meditation supplies—

Related remarks

http://www.spencerart.ku.edu/about/dialogue/fdpt.shtml

Mary Dusenbury (Radcliffe '64)—

"… I think a textile, like any work of art, holds a tremendous amount of information— technical, material, historical, social, philosophical— but beyond that, many works of art are very beautiful and they speak to us on many layers— our intellect, our heart, our emotions. I've been going to museums since I was a very small child, thinking about what I saw, and going back to discover new things, to see pieces that spoke very deeply to me, to look at them again, and to find more and more meaning relevant to me in different ways and at different times of my life. …

… I think I would suggest to people that first of all they just look. Linger by pieces they find intriguing and beautiful, and look deeply. Then, if something interests them, we have tried to put a little information around the galleries to give a bit of history, a bit of context, for each piece. But the most important is just to look very deeply."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikaya_Buddhism

According to Robert Thurman, the term "Nikāya Buddhism" was coined by Professor Masatoshi Nagatomi of Harvard University, as a way to avoid the usage of the term Hinayana.[12] "Nikaya Buddhism" is thus an attempt to find a more neutral way of referring to Buddhists who follow one of the early Buddhist schools, and their practice.

12. The Emptiness That is Compassion:
An Essay on Buddhist Ethics, Robert A. F. Thurman, 1980
[Religious Traditions , Vol. 4 No. 2, Oct.-Nov. 1981, pp. 11-34]

http://dsal.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/philologic/getobject.pl?c.2:1:6.pali

Nikāya [Sk. nikāya, ni+kāya]
collection ("body") assemblage, class, group

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/नि

Sanskrit etymology for नि (ni)

From Proto-Indo-European *ni …

Prefix

नि (ni)

  • down
  • back
  • in, into

http://www.rigpawiki.org/index.php?title=Kaya

Kaya (Skt. kāya སྐུ་, Tib. ku Wyl. sku ) —
the Sanskrit word kaya literally means ‘body’
but can also signify dimension, field or basis.

སྐུ། (Wyl. sku ) n. Pron.: ku

structure, existentiality, founding stratum ▷HVG KBEU

gestalt ▷HVG LD

Note that The Trinity of Max Black  is a picture of  a set
i.e., of an "assemblage, class, group."

Note also the reference above to the word "gestalt."

"Was ist Raum, wie können wir ihn
erfassen und gestalten?"

Walter Gropius

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Eightfold Symmetries

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:48 PM

Harvard Crimson headline today–
"Deconstructing Design"

Reconstructing Design

The phrase "eightfold way" in today's
previous entry has a certain
  graphic resonance…

For instance, an illustration from the
Wikipedia article "Noble Eightfold Path" —

Dharma Wheel from Wikipedia

Adapted detail–

Adapted Dharma Wheel detail

See also, from
St. Joseph's Day

Weyl's 'Symmetry,' the triquetrum, and the eightfold cube

Harvard students who view Christian symbols
with fear and loathing may meditate
on the above as a representation of
the Gankyil rather than of the Trinity.

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