Log24

Sunday, June 2, 2019

Coordinatizing the Deathly Hallows

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:59 PM

See as well, in this journal, Deathly HallowsRelativity Problem, and Space Cross.

A related quote "This is not mathematics; this is theology."

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Deathly Hallows

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 AM

The previous post, on the July 13 death of computer scientist Robert Fano,
suggests a review of "Deathly Hallows" posts in this journal. From that review —

Mathematics

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-WikipediaFanoPlane.jpg

The Fano plane block design

Magic

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-DeathlyHallows.jpg

The Deathly Hallows symbol—
Two blocks short of  a design.

For further information, click the image below —

 .

Tuesday, March 23, 2021

The Fano Hallows

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:39 PM

From a Log24 post of Friday, February 26, 2021 —

( Not to be confused with The Tin Man’s Hat. )

This image may be regarded as memorializing a photographer
who died at 80 on Feb. 26 and who

“captured Warhol’s self-designed mythology in the making”
Alex Vadukul in The New York Times  today

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

A Deathly Triangle

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 11:27 PM

'Imprisoned in a Tesseract,' a study of novelist James Blish

Friday, December 25, 2020

Design Theory

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:33 PM
Mathematics

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-WikipediaFanoPlane.jpg

The Fano plane block design

Magic

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-DeathlyHallows.jpg

The Deathly Hallows symbol—
Two blocks short of  a design.

Another name for the Fano plane design — The Ghostly  Hallows.
From a search in this journal  for Ghostly  —

Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Connection

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:27 AM

Hurt’s dies natalis  (date of death, in the saints’ sense) was,
it now seems, 25  January 2017, not 27.

A connection, for fantasy fans, between the Philosopher’s Stone
(represented by the eightfold cube) and the Deathly Hallows
(represented by the usual Fano-plane figure) —

Images from a Log24 search for “Holocron.”

Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Wolf as Lamb

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 PM

The above graphic design is by Noma Bar.

See as well the lamb-in-triangle of the Dec. 27 post
A Candle for Lily

Related material —

Remarks by Evelyn  Lamb on the Deathly Hallows symbol.

Saturday, January 6, 2018

Yale News

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 5:24 AM

The Yale of the title is not the university, but rather the
mathematician Paul B. Yale. Yale's illustration of the Fano
plane is below.

IMAGE- Triangular models of the 4-point affine plane A and 7-point projective plane PA

A different illustration from a mathematician named Greenberg —

This illustration of the ominous phrase "line at infinity"
may serve as a sort of Deathly Hallows  for Greenberg.
According to the AMS website yesterday, he died on
December 12, 2017:

A search of this  journal for Greenberg yields no mention of
the dead mathematician, but does yield some remarks
on art that are pehaps less bleak than the above illustration.

For instance —

Art adapted from the Google search screen. Discuss.

Monday, January 2, 2017

Sitcom Theology

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:20 PM

The Hollywood Reporter

"William Christopher, best known for playing Father Mulcahy
on the hit sitcom M*A*S*H , died Saturday [Dec. 31, 2016] of
lung cancer, his agent confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter.
He was 84.

Christopher died at his home in Pasadena, with his wife by
his bedside, at 5:10 a.m. on New Year's Eve, according to a
statement from his agent."

— 5:59 PM PST 12/31/2016 by Meena Jang

Image reshown in this journal on the midnight (Eastern time)
preceding Christopher's death —

IMAGE- Triangular models of the 4-point affine plane A and 7-point projective plane PA

Related material —

From a Log24 search for "Deathly Hallows" —

Mathematics

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-WikipediaFanoPlane.jpg

The Fano plane block design

Magic

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-DeathlyHallows.jpg

The Deathly Hallows symbol—
Two blocks short of  a design.

Those who prefer Latin with their theology
may search this journal for "In Nomine Patris."

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Hint of Reality

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 12:45 PM

From an article* in Proceedings of Bridges 2014

As artists, we are particularly interested in the symmetries of real world physical objects.

Three natural questions arise:

1. Which groups can be represented as the group of symmetries of some real-world physical object?

2. Which groups have actually  been represented as the group of symmetries of some real-world physical object?

3. Are there any glaring gaps – small, beautiful groups that should have a physical representation in a symmetric object but up until now have not?

The article was cited by Evelyn Lamb in her Scientific American  
weblog on May 19, 2014.

The above three questions from the article are relevant to a more
recent (Oct. 24, 2015) remark by Lamb:

" finite projective planes [in particular, the 7-point Fano plane,
about which Lamb is writing] 
seem like a triumph of purely 
axiomatic thinking over any hint of reality…."

For related hints of reality, see Eightfold Cube  in this journal.

* "The Quaternion Group as a Symmetry Group," by Vi Hart and Henry Segerman

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Omega

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Omega is a Greek letter, Ω , used in mathematics to denote
a set on which a group acts. 

For instance, the affine group AGL(3,2) is a group of 1,344
actions on the eight elements of the vector 3-space over the
two-element Galois field GF(2), or, if you prefer, on the Galois
field  Ω = GF(8).

Related fiction:  The Eight , by Katherine Neville.

Related non-fiction:  A remark by Werner Heisenberg
in this journal on Saturday, June 6, 2015, the eightfold cube ,
and the illustrations below —

Mathematics

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-WikipediaFanoPlane.jpg

The Fano plane block design

Magic

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-DeathlyHallows.jpg

The Deathly Hallows symbol—
Two blocks short of  a design.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Colorful Tale

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

(A sequel to yesterday's ART WARS and this
morning's De Colores )

“Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature
of modern science is the emergence of abstract
symbolic structures as the hard core of objectivity
behind– as Eddington puts it– the colorful tale
of the subjective storyteller mind.” — Hermann Weyl
(Philosophy of  Mathematics and Natural Science ,
Princeton, 1949, p. 237)

See also Deathly Hallows.

Friday, February 6, 2015

The Annotated Spielraum

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:00 AM

Comments on two sub-images from yesterday's
The Big Spielraum  (image, 1 MB) that may or
may not interest Emma Watson —

The Potter Sub-Image

This is from a link in a July 8, 2011, post:

The above "Childhood's End" link leads to
a midrash on the Harry Potter series:

"After pg. 759 in Harry Potter and the 
Deathly Hallows 
, my childhood ended."

The Carmichael Sub-Image

The number of the last page in the last Harry Potter
book is 759.  This number may, for those with
cabalistic tendencies, be interpreted as the
number 3*23*11 from a 1931 mathematics paper:

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Pyramid Dance

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:00 AM

Oslo artist Josefine Lyche has a new Instagram post,
this time on pyramids (the monumental kind).

My response —

Wikipedia's definition of a tetrahedron as a
"triangle-based pyramid"

and remarks from a Log24 post of August 14, 2013 :

Norway dance (as interpreted by an American)

IMAGE- 'The geometry of the dance' is that of a tetrahedron, according to Peter Pesic

I prefer a different, Norwegian, interpretation of "the dance of four."

Related material:
The clash between square and tetrahedral versions of PG(3,2).

See also some of Burkard Polster's triangle-based pyramids
and a 1983 triangle-based pyramid in a paper that Polster cites —

(Click image below to enlarge.)

Some other illustrations that are particularly relevant
for Lyche, an enthusiast of magic :

From On Art and Magic (May 5, 2011) —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-ThemeAndVariations-Hofstadter.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-BlockDesignTheory.jpg

Mathematics

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-WikipediaFanoPlane.jpg

The Fano plane block design

Magic

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-DeathlyHallows.jpg

The Deathly Hallows  symbol—
Two blocks short of  a design.

 

(Updated at about 7 PM ET on Dec. 3.)

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

A Hand for the Band

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 10:30 AM

"How about another hand for the band?
They work real hard for it.
The Cherokee Cowboys, ladies and gentlemen."

— Ray Price, video, "Danny Boy Mid 80's Live"

Other deathly hallows suggested by today's NY Times

Click the above image for posts from December 14.

That image mentions a death on August 5, 2005, in
"entertainment Mecca" Branson, Missouri.

Another note from August 5, 2005, reposted here
on Monday

IMAGE- Aug. 5, 2005- Galois tesseract, Shakespeherian Rag, Sir Alec Guinness

Happy birthday, Keith Richards.

Friday, December 16, 2011

Friday

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:56 AM

"Just the facts." — Attributed to Joe Friday

A search in this journal in honor of the late
Christopher Hitchens yields links to two of his reviews—
a review of the author of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo  and
a review of a work by a rather different author—

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows .

Friday, July 15, 2011

Crossing the Bridge

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:59 PM

King Arthur and the Deathly Hallows

BLACK KNIGHT: None shall pass.

ARTHUR: What?

BLACK KNIGHT: None shall pass.

ARTHUR: I have no quarrel with you, good Sir Knight,
                but I must cross this bridge.

BLACK KNIGHT: Then you shall die.

ARTHUR: I command you as King of the Britons
                to stand aside!

BLACK KNIGHT: I move for no man.

ARTHUR: So be it!

— Monty Python

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110715-Bushell-BlackKnight1954-Sm.jpg

Above: Anthony Bushell as King Arthur in 1954.
Bushell died on April 2, 1997 (4/2/97).
"Well, she was just seventeen…."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110715-NYlotteryEvening.jpg

Thursday, May 5, 2011

On Art and Magic

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:30 PM

Two Blocks Short of a Design:

A sequel to this morning’s post on Douglas Hofstadter

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-ThemeAndVariations-Hofstadter.jpg

Photo of Hofstadter by Mike McGrath taken May 13, 2006

Related material — See Lyche’s  “Theme and Variations” in this journal
and Hofstadter’s “Variations on a Theme as the Essence of Imagination
Scientific American  October 1982

A quotation from a 1985 book by Hofstadter—

“… we need to entice people with the beauties of clarity, simplicity, precision,
elegance, balance, symmetry, and so on.

Those artistic qualities… are the things that I have tried to explore and even
to celebrate in Metamagical Themas .  (It is not for nothing that the word
‘magic’ appears inside the title!)”

The artistic qualities Hofstadter lists are best sought in mathematics, not in magic.

An example from Wikipedia —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-BlockDesignTheory.jpg

Mathematics

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-WikipediaFanoPlane.jpg

The Fano plane block design

Magic

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110505-DeathlyHallows.jpg

The Deathly Hallows  symbol—
Two blocks short of  a design.

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Ariadne’s Clue

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 PM

IMAGE- The final page of 'Deathly Hallows' is 759.

Related symbolism from Plato’s Cave—

Recall that Ariadne in “Inception” is played by Ellen Page .

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110301-Inception256w.jpg

Show me all  the blueprints.”
— Howard Hughes, according to Hollywood

Sunday, November 7, 2010

The Seven

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 AM


Fano plane with cubes as points
 
Those who prefer magic
may consult The Deathly Hallows.

Monday, July 30, 2007

Monday July 30, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 7:00 PM
The Deathly Hallows Symbol

'Deathly Hallows symbol, related to the 'Snakes on a Plane' cartoon.

Some fear that the Harry Potter books introduce children to the occult; they are not entirely mistaken.

According to Wikipedia, the “Deathly Hallows” of the final Harry Potter novel are “three fictional magical objects that appear in the book.”

The vertical line, circle, and triangle in the symbol pictured above are said to refer to these three magical objects.

One fan relates the “Deathly Hallows” symbol above, taken from the spine of a British children’s edition of the book, to a symbol for “the divine (or sacred, or secret) fire” of alchemy. She relates this fire in turn to “serpent power” and the number seven:

Kristin Devoe at a Potter fan site:

“We know that seven is a powerful number in the novels. Tom Riddle calls it ‘the most powerfully magic number.‘ The ability to balance the seven chakras within oneself allows the person to harness the secret fire. This secret fire in alchemy is the same as the kundalini or coiled snake in yogic philosophy. It is also known as ‘serpent power’ or the ‘dragon’ depending on the tradition. The kundalini is polar in nature and this energy, this internal fire, is very powerful for those who are able to harness it and it purifies the aspirant allowing them the knowledge of the universe. This secret fire is the Serpent Power which transmutes the base metals into the Perfect Gold of the Sun.

It is interesting that the symbol of the caduceus in alchemy is thought to have been taken from the symbol of the kundalini. Perched on the top of the caduceus, or the staff of Hermes, the messenger of the gods and revealer of alchemy, is the golden snitch itself! Many fans have compared this to the scene in The Order of the Phoenix where Harry tells Dumbledore about the attack on Mr. Weasley and says, ‘I was the snake, I saw it from the snake’s point of view.

The chapter continues with Dumbledore consulting ‘one of the fragile silver instruments whose function Harry had never known,’ tapping it with his wand:

The instrument tinkled into life at once with rhythmic clinking noises. Tiny puffs of pale green smoke issued from the minuscule silver tube at the top. Dumbledore watched the smoke closely, his brow furrowed, and after a few seconds, the tiny puffs became a steady stream of smoke that thickened and coiled into he air… A serpent’s head grew out of the end of it, opening its mouth wide. Harry wondered whether the instrument was confirming his story; He looked eagerly at Dumbledore for a sign that he was right, but Dumbledore did not look up.

“Naturally, Naturally,” muttered Dumbledore apparently to himself, still observing the stream of smoke without the slightest sign of surprise. “But in essence divided?”

Harry could make neither head not tail of this question. The smoke serpent, however split instantly into two snakes, both coiling and undulating in the dark air. With a look of grim satisfaction Dumbledore gave the instrument another gentle tap with his wand; The clinking noise slowed and died, and the smoke serpents grew faint, became a formless haze, and vanished.

Could these coiling serpents of smoke be foreshadowing events to come in Deathly Hallows where Harry learns to ‘awaken the serpent’ within himself? Could the snake’s splitting in two symbolize the dual nature of the kundalini?”

Related material

The previous entry

“And the serpent’s eyes shine    
As he wraps around the vine
In The Garden of Allah” —

and the following
famous illustration of
the double-helix
structure of DNA:

 Odile Crick, drawing of DNA structure in the journal Nature, 1953
This is taken from
a figure accompanying
an obituary, in today’s
New York Times, of the
artist who drew the figure
.

The double helix
is not a structure
from magic; it may,
however, as the Rowling
quote above shows, have
certain occult uses,
better suited to
Don Henley’s
Garden of Allah
than to the
  Garden of Apollo.

Seven is Heaven...

Similarly, the three objects
above (Log24 on April 9)
are from pure mathematics–
the realm of Apollo, not
of those in Henley’s song.

The similarity of the
top object of the three —
the “Fano plane” — to
the “Deathly Hallows
symbol is probably
entirely coincidental.

Tuesday, March 23, 2021

The Cornfield Translation . . .

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:19 AM

Continues from “Dark Fields of the Republic” (March 11, 2014) —

Sunday, March 21, 2021

Mathematics and Narrative: The Unity

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:25 PM

“To conquer, three boxes* have to synchronize and join together into the Unity.”

―Wonder Woman in Zack Snyder’s Justice League

See also The Unity of Combinatorics  and The Miracle Octad Generator.

* Cf.  Aitchison’s Octads

Friday, February 26, 2021

Non-Chaos Non-Magic

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:21 PM

For fans of “WandaVision” —

“1978 was perhaps the seminal year in the origin of chaos magic. . . .”

Wikipedia article on Chaos Magic

Non-Chaos Non-Magic from Halloween 1978 —

The Cullinane diamond theorem, AMS Notices, Feb. 1979, pp. A-193-194

Related material —

A doctoral student of a different  Peter Cameron

( Not to be confused with The Tin Man’s Hat. )

Thursday, May 28, 2020

Unity Game

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:59 PM

“Old men ought to be explorers.” — T. S. Eliot

“Everybody’s lost but me!” — Young Indiana Jones, quoted
in a book review (“Knox Peden on Martin Hägglund”) in
Sydney Review of Books  on May 26 . . .

” Here I am reminded of the words of
the young Indiana Jones alone in the desert,
decades before the Last Crusade:
‘Everybody’s lost but me.’ “

 Related remarks — Now You See It, Now You Don’t.

Finite Geometry at GitHub

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 5:04 PM

My website on finite geometry is now available
on GitHub at http://m759.github.io/ . The part
of greatest interest to coders is also at
https://repl.it/@m759/View-4x4x4#index.html .

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Raiders of the Lost Unity

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:21 PM

Mathematics as a Black Art

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:34 AM

Thursday, May 7, 2020

Now You See It, Now You Don’t

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:00 PM

“Mathematics may be art, but to the general public it is
a black art, more akin to magic and mystery. This presents
a constant challenge to the mathematical community: to explain
how art fits into our subject and what we mean by beauty.”

— Sir Michael Atiyah, quoted here on April 4, 2016

 

Illustrations, from the American Mathematical Society Spring
2020 book sale, of a book scheduled to be published May 28.

Kant as Diamond Cutter

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:26 AM

“He wished Kant were alive. Kant would have appreciated it.
That master diamond cutter.”

— Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance , Part III.

Kant’s  “category theory” —

“In the Transcendental Analytic, Kant deduces the table of twelve categories, or pure concepts of the understanding….

The categories must be ‘schematized’ because their non-empirical origin in pure understanding prevents their having the sort of sensible content that would connect them immediately to the objects of experience; transcendental schemata are mediating representations that are meant to establish the connection between pure concepts and appearances in a rule-governed way. Mathematical concepts are discussed in this context since they are unique in being pure but also sensible concepts: they are pure because they are strictly a priori  in origin, and yet they are sensible since they are constructed in concreto . ”

— Shabel, Lisa, “Kant’s Philosophy of Mathematics”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy  (Spring 2016 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = <https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/spr2016/entries/kant-mathematics/>.

See also The Diamond Theorem and Octad.us.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

“The Ship of Theseus”…

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:17 PM

is a philosophical conundrum  discussed this morning  in the weblog of
David Justice.

A related statement of this “problem of identity,” from posts
in this  weblog tagged “For Banff 2009” yesterday afternoon

Remarks related to the ship of Theseus —

Sunday, April 26, 2020

The Triangle of Art

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

This post was suggested by yesterday morning’s link to  The Fano Hallows.

“Mathematics may be art, but to the general public it is
a black art, more akin to magic and mystery. This presents
a constant challenge to the mathematical community: to explain
how art fits into our subject and what we mean by beauty.”

— Sir Michael Atiyah, quoted here on April 4, 2016

A symbol related to  The Fano Hallows

Sunday, June 30, 2019

Ex Fano* Continues

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:10 AM

Yesterday's post The Benson Epiphany suggests a review of another
retired UC Davis mathematics professor who also died in May
John Robert Chuchel —

UC Davis mathematics students may consult the following page:

A check of this  journal on the date of Chuchel's reported death
yields posts now tagged Hallows for UC Davis.

* See Ex Fano Apollinis  (June 24).

Sunday, May 19, 2019

The Building Blocks of Geometry

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 10:21 PM

From "On the life and scientific work of Gino Fano
by Alberto Collino, Alberto Conte, and Alessandro Verra,
ICCM Notices , July 2014, Vol. 2 No. 1, pp. 43-57 —

" Indeed, about the Italian debate on foundations of Geometry, it is not rare to read comments in the same spirit of the following one, due to Jeremy Gray13. He is essentially reporting Hans Freudenthal’s point of view:

' When the distinguished mathematician and historian of mathematics Hans Freudenthal analysed Hilbert’s  Grundlagen he argued that the link between reality and geometry appears to be severed for the first time in Hilbert’s work. However, he discovered that Hilbert had been preceded by the Italian mathematician Gino Fano in 1892. . . .' "

13 J. Gray, "The Foundations of Projective Geometry in Italy," Chapter 24 (pp. 269–279) in his book Worlds Out of Nothing , Springer (2010).


Restoring the severed link —

Structure of the eightfold cube

See also Espacement  and The Thing and I.
 

Related material —

 
 

Poem

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:36 PM

"The technical aspects
Were carefully planned,
And the social aspect
Just happened."

Robert Fano

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Defining Form

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:00 PM

Images related to the previous post

Thursday, December 17, 2015

S-Curves by Peter Dickinson

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 PM

British author Peter Dickinson, who reportedly died yesterday,
Dec. 16, 2015, at 88, wrote the following (published in the UK
in 1975 and in the US in 1976) —

'Chance, Luck and Destiny' by Peter Dickinson, page 34

Inverted image of the above page —

'Chance, Luck and Destiny' by Peter Dickinson, page 34

See also, from the date of Dickinson's death, a post on
"A Fight for the Soul…" and a post on the symbol "S."

Of interest too are some remarks related to today's earlier post,
"Hint of Reality" 

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

New Horizons

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:15 PM

"We have the answer to all your fears
It's short, it's simple, it's crystal clear"

See as well last night's Midnight Review.

Friday, March 16, 2012

For the Clueless

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:11 AM

"And she provided him besides with a ball of thread,
bidding him to fasten the end of it to the entrance
of the Labyrinth, and unwind it as he went in, that
it might serve him as a clue to find his way out again."

— "Theseus and Ariadne," by Charles Morris

From "Ariadne's Clue," a post of March 1 last year—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110301-DeathlyHallows759.jpg

The Watson here is not Emma, but Victor—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix12/120316-Watson7detail.jpg

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Getting with the Program

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:28 AM

Stanley Fish in The New York Times  yesterday evening—

IMAGE- Stanley Fish, 'The Old Order Changeth,' Boxing Day, 2011

From the MLA program Fish discussed—

IMAGE- MLA session, 'Defining Form,' chaired by Colleen Rosenfeld of Pomona College

Above: An MLA session, “Defining Form,” led
by Colleen Rosenfeld of Pomona College

An example from Pomona College in 1968—

IMAGE- Triangular models of small affine and projective finite geometries

The same underlying geometries (i.e., “form”) may be modeled with
a square figure and a cubical figure rather than with the triangular
figures of 1968 shown above.

See Finite Geometry of the Square and Cube.

Those who prefer a literary approach to form may enjoy the recent post As Is.
(For some context, see Game of Shadows.)

Sunday, December 18, 2011

Closure

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Christopher Hitchens on J. K. Rowling—

“We must not let in daylight upon magic,” as Walter Bagehot remarked in another connection, and the wish to have everything clarified is eventually self-defeating in its own terms. In her correct determination to bring down the curtain decisively, Rowling has gone further than she should, and given us not so much a happy ending as an ending which suggests that evil has actually been defeated (you should forgive the expression) for good.

Greater authors— Arthur Conan Doyle most notably— have been in the same dilemma when seeking closure. And, like Conan Doyle, Rowling has won imperishable renown for giving us an identifiable hero and a fine caricature of a villain, and for making a fictional bit of King’s Cross station as luminous as a certain address on nearby Baker Street. It is given to few authors to create a world apart, and to populate it as well as illustrate it in the mind.

"A fictional bit of King's Cross Station"—

Throughout the series, Harry has traveled to King's Cross Station, either to depart for Hogwarts or return to London on the Hogwarts Express. The station has always symbolized the crossroad between the Muggle world and the Wizarding realm and Harry's constant shuffling between, and his conflict with, the two extremes. As Harry now finds himself at a transition point between life and death, it is purely to be expected that he would see it within his own mind as a simulacrum of that station. And though Dumbledore assures Harry that he (Harry) is not actually dead, it seems Harry can choose that option if he so wishes. Harry has literally and figuratively been stripped bare, and must decide either to board a train that will transport him to the "other side", or return to the living world…. — Wikibooks.org

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