Log24

Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Black Fire

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:03 PM

(Continued from earlier posts now also tagged Black Fire.)

Friday, December 28, 2018

Blackline Master

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 PM

From a Log24 post of September 4, 2018, "Identity Crisis" —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180903-Womens_Night_Bingo-at48.41-The_Net.jpg

From the 2011 Spanish film "Verbo" — (Click to enlarge) —

From a  Blackline Master

Sunday, August 26, 2018

For the Green Man

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:30 PM

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180826-Google_News-Entertainment-obits-500w.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180826-Wicker_Man-Green_Man_Inn.jpg

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180826-Not_Easy-post-091221.jpg

Friday, April 29, 2016

Blackboard Jungle…

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Continues .

An older and wiser James Spader —

"Never underestimate the power of glitter."

Glitter by Josefine Lyche, as of diamond dust

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Black List

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

A search for "Max Black" in this journal yields some images
from a post of August 30, 2006 . . .

A circular I Ching

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060830-SeventhSymbol.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"Jackson has identified the seventh symbol."
— Stargate

The "Jackson" above is played by the young James Spader,
who in an older version currently stars in "The Blacklist."

"… the memorable models of science are 'speculative instruments,'
to borrow I. A. Richards' happy title. They, too, bring about a wedding
of disparate subjects, by a distinctive operation of transfer of the
implications  of relatively well-organized cognitive fields. And as with
other weddings, their outcomes are unpredictable."

Max Black in Models and Metaphors , Cornell U. Press, 1962

Sunday, September 20, 2015

Orange Mass

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:08 PM

"Blue Eyes took his Sunday painting seriously."

In memory of Jackie Collins, a post on Sinatra's favorite color.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Fade to… Orange?

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:05 PM

"One heart will wear a valentine." — Sinatra

Friday, October 18, 2013

Notes at the End (Or: Green October)

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

From the Spokane Spokesman-Review  today —

"Services are pending for St. Aloysius Church at Gonzaga University"

This suggests a review of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man ,
a novel by James Joyce in the Viking Critical Library containing
a brief discussion of St. Aloysius Gonzaga.

In keeping with the approach to epistemology in today's previous post

See also the link to remarks on naturalized epistemology
at the end of "Scoop," a Log24 post from the date
of the above review — July 9, 2004.

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

The Hunt for Green October…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:27 PM

Continues.

A note on the image in this evening's previous post —

This journal on April 24, 2006 —

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060424-Cash.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Her wallet's filled with pictures

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Another Green Door, and…

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:48 AM

Another Bullshit Night in Suck City:

IMAGE- 'Another Bullshit Night in Suck City,' by Nick Flynn

For the 2012 film version, see

(Click image below for a review.)

Personally, I prefer the green door of last night's 10 PM post
(
written partly in honor of the body mentioned here on October 23).

The cover of the Nick Flynn book shows a green door beneath a tree.
For a different tree, but similar metaphor, see Confirmation (July 16, 2007).

Saturday, October 27, 2012

Behind the Green Door

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:00 PM

It's 10 PM .

Backstory—

Posts of October 24th—
Love Ghost and Versions
and a version of Plan 9— 

Favicon 9

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110408-HopkinsAsExorcist.jpg

Related religious meditation—

Irresistible Grace, illustrated by The Girl in the Yellow Dress.

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Black Diamond

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:26 PM

IMAGE- Four-elements-diamond test problem in the style of Raven's Progressive Matrices (answer: the black diamond)

“To say more is to say less.”
― Harlan Ellison, as quoted at goodreads.com

Saying less—

Thursday, August 8, 2019

High Definition

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:52 AM

See also the August 6 post Black Fire.

Wednesday, August 7, 2019

Rehinged

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:19 PM

Recent posts now tagged Black Fire suggest some context . . .

Hinges:

Meditations on the Portals of the Imagination 

by Grace Dane Mazur, A K Peters/CRC Press;
first edition November 8, 2010

Interviewer's questions to the author (Feb. 4, 2011) —

"This book fuses together literature, art, science, history,
certainly the underworld–so many different points of obsession
for you, and you move so swiftly among them. It feels like a
magnum opus in that way. Where do you go from here?
After the hinges of hell, what comes next?"

The reviews?

Hinged

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:15 PM

Monday, August 5, 2019

The Structure of Nada

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:41 PM
 

“What did he fear? It was not a fear or dread, It was a nothing that he knew too well. It was all a nothing and a man was a nothing too. It was only that and light was all it needed and a certain cleanness and order. Some lived in it and never felt it but he knew it all was nada y pues nada y nada y pues nada. Our nada who art in nada, nada be thy name thy kingdom nada thy will be nada in nada as it is in nada. Give us this nada our daily nada and nada us our nada as we nada our nadas and nada us not into nada but deliver us from nada; pues nada. Hail nothing full of nothing, nothing is with thee. He smiled and stood before a bar with a shining steam pressure coffee machine.”

— From Ernest Hemingway,
A Clean, Well-Lighted Place

 

Sanskrit (transliterated) —

    nada:
  
  
  the universal sound, vibration.

“So Nada Brahma  means not only God the Creator
is sound; but also (and above all), Creation, the cosmos,
the world, is sound.  And: Sound is the world.”

— Joachim-Ernst Berendt,   
   author of Nada Brahma

 

Grace under Pressure  meets  Phonons under Strain .

Flowers for Barry

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:55 AM

(Continued from a post of Pi Day 2009, "Flowers for Barry,"
and from a post of  July 5, 2019, "Darkly Enchanting") —

From this  journal on 5 juillet 2019

Related material —

Grace Dane ("Gretchen") Mazur on Black Fire —

Friday, December 28, 2018

Phenomenology of Viewing

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:58 PM

From a post of December 22, 2018

See as well related posts now tagged Blackline.

Love and Darkness

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:29 PM

Thursday, December 27, 2018

A Candle for Lily

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

Detail —

See also . . . http://m759.net/wordpress/?s=Alpha+Omega .

Sunday, December 23, 2018

Winter Fire

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:14 AM

From the previous post

Cover of April 1977 Poetry magazine by Paul Hoffman

From December 27, 2017

Also from December 27, 2017 —

Saturday, December 22, 2018

The Hat Tip

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:59 PM

"Form the turtle!"
— Rex Harrison, quoted here
on March 12, 2005.

Saturday, August 25, 2018

Schoolgirl Problem

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:40 PM

For Pagan Moore

http://www.log24.com/log/pix18/180825-Wicker_Man-scene.jpg

See also "as frivolous as a willow on a tombstone."

Saturday, April 7, 2018

Sides

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:47 AM

The FBI holding cube in "The Blacklist" —

" 'The Front' is not the whole story . . . ."

— Vincent Canby, New York Times  film review, 1976,
     as quoted in Wikipedia.

See also Solomon's Cube in this  journal.

IMAGE- 'Solomon's Cube'

Webpage demonstrating symmetries of 'Solomon's Cube'

Some may view the above web page as illustrating the
Glasperlenspiel  passage quoted here in Summa Mythologica 

“"I suddenly realized that in the language, or at any rate
in the spirit of the Glass Bead Game, everything actually
was all-meaningful, that every symbol and combination of
symbols led not hither and yon, not to single examples,
experiments, and proofs, but into the center, the mystery
and innermost heart of the world, into primal knowledge.
Every transition from major to minor in a sonata, every
transformation of a myth or a religious cult, every classical
or artistic formulation was, I realized in that flashing moment,
if seen with a truly meditative mind, nothing but a direct route
into the interior of the cosmic mystery, where in the alternation
between inhaling and exhaling, between heaven and earth,
between Yin and Yang, holiness is forever being created.”

A less poetic meditation on the above 4x4x4 design cube —

"I saw that in the alternation between front and back,
between top and bottom, between left and right,
symmetry is forever being created."

See also a related remark by Lévi-Strauss in 1955

"…three different readings become possible:
left to right, top to bottom, front to back."

Friday, April 6, 2018

Watching the Zero

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

From "The Blacklist" Season 5, Episode 11 —

– Remind me again what it is that we think we're doing here.
– The phone acts as a passive packet sniffer.
It's a trick Tom taught me.
– Packet sniffer? Ugh.
– The FBI uses them.
I'm sure your tech people know all about them.
It can intercept and log traffic that passes over a digital network.
– It is an absolute mystery to me how these gadgets work —
the Dick Tracy phones, these blueteeth connections.
Quite frankly, I miss the rotary phone.
Except for that zero.
Watching that zero crawl back.
Oh, my God.
It was painful.
– We have the code.
– Great.

Read more:  https://www.springfieldspringfield.co.uk/
view_episode_scripts.php?
tv-show=the-blacklist&episode=s05e11

And more:

Philip J. Davis reportedly turned 86 on January 2, 2009.
An image from this journal on that date

Rotary telephone dial

“You have the incorrect number.
I will tell you what you are doing:
you are turning the letter O
instead of the zero.”

— "Symbols and Signs,"
Vladimir Nabokov, 1948

Plan 9

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:18 PM

Salinger's 'Nine Stories,' paperback with 3x3 array of titles on cover, adapted in a Jan. 2, 2009, Log24 post on Nabokov's 1948 'Signs and Symbols'

The Thread Phantom: A Death on Pi Day*

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:42 PM

The American Mathematical Society on April 4 posted a story
about a death that they said occurred on March 14  (Pi Day):

* Notes on the Title —

The Thread Part 

The Phantom Part 

"What a yarn!" — Raymond Reddington in "The Blacklist"

Fact check on the death date reported by the AMS —

But Davis's funeral-home obituary agrees with the Pi Day date.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Date

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:08 PM

An image discussed in the previous post

From a search for "1943" in this journal — 

"Paradine found himself growing slightly confused . . . ."

Gold Bug Variations (Continued)

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:32 PM


See as well a search for "Gold Bug"  in this  journal.

From that search —

Richard Powers, The Gold Bug Variations , first published in 1991—

Botkin, whatever her gifts as a conversationist, is almost as old
as the rediscovery of Mendel. The other extreme in age, 
Joe Lovering, beat a time-honored path out of pure math 
into muddy population statistics. Ressler has seen the guy 
potting about in the lab, although exactly what the excitable kid 
does is anybody's guess. He looks decidedly gumfooted holding
any equipment more corporeal than a chi-square. Stuart takes
him to the Y for lunch, part of a court-your-resources campaign.
He has the sub, Lovering the congealed mac and cheese. 
Hardly are they seated when Joe whips out a napkin and begins
sketching proofs. He argues that the genetic code, as an 
algorithmic formal system, is subject to Gödel's Incompleteness
Theorem. "That would mean the symbolic language of the code 
can't be both consistent and complete. Wouldn't that be a kick 
in the head?"

Kid talk, competitive showing off, intellectual fantasy. 
But Ressler knows what Joe is driving at. He's toyed with similar 
ideas, cast in less abstruse terms. We are the by-product of the 
mechanism in there. So it must be more ingenious than us. 
Anything complex enough to create consciousness may be too 
complex for consciousness to understand. Yet the ultimate paradox
is Lovering, crouched over his table napkin, using proofs to 
demonstrate proof's limits. Lovering laughs off recursion and takes
up another tack: the key is to find some formal symmetry folded
in this four-base chaos
. Stuart distrusts this approach even more.
He picks up the tab for their two untouched lunches, thanking 
Lovering politely for the insight.

"The key is to find some formal symmetry…."

IMAGE- Valéry on ornament in 'Method of Leonardo,' with Valéry's serpent-and-key emblem

Saturday, June 4, 2016

Icons

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

From this morning's news, a  cultural icon —

From November 18, 2015, four  icons —

— the three favicons above, and the following:

Jack in the Box, by Natasha Wescoat

Saturday, January 23, 2016

Hard

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

"Hard Science Fiction in the era of short attention spans,
crowd-sourcing, and rapid obsolescence"

— May 26, 2012, Dragon Press Bookstore symposium

Related material:  Posts now tagged Black Diamond.

IMAGE- 'The Stars My Destination' (with cover slightly changed)

Friday, January 22, 2016

Story

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:21 AM

The New Yorker , April 12, 2004 —

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Thursday, September 3, 2015

Rings of August

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:20 AM

For the title, see posts from August 2007 tagged Gyges.

Related theological remarks:

Boolean  spaces (old) vs. Galois  spaces  (new) in 
"The Quality Without a Name"
(a post from August 26, 2015) and the

Related literature:  A search for Borogoves in this journal will yield
remarks on the 1943 tale underlying the above film.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Figure

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

'In the Phaedrus, Plato speaks of the soul in a figure.'

           — "The Noble Rider and the Sound of Words"

For some backstory, click or touch the dark passage above.

See also Monolith  (August 23, 2014).

Saturday, June 13, 2015

Egg Tales

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

"And not all the king's men nor his horses
 Will resurrect his corpus."

Finnegans Wake

See as well Andy Weir's "The Egg" and Working Backward.

Friday, April 24, 2015

Speak, Memory

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 AM

For "Blacklist" fans —

See also Mimsy.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Colorful Tale

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

(A sequel to yesterday's ART WARS and this
morning's De Colores )

“Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature
of modern science is the emergence of abstract
symbolic structures as the hard core of objectivity
behind– as Eddington puts it– the colorful tale
of the subjective storyteller mind.” — Hermann Weyl
(Philosophy of  Mathematics and Natural Science ,
Princeton, 1949, p. 237)

See also Deathly Hallows.

De Colores

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:02 AM

See orange, black, green at  The Daily Princetonian
and in this journal.

Saturday, February 7, 2015

Word and Object

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:00 PM

From actor James Spader, whose birthday is today —

"… my father taught English. My mother taught art…."

— Spader in a 2014 interview

See as well the 2013 film "Words and Pictures"
and Log24 posts on a 2007 film, "The Last Mimzy."

Above: A scene from Spader's TV series "The Blacklist"
that was aired on Thursday, February 5, 2015.

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Monolith

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:16 PM
 

  

Unity 

Roman numeral I
as well as capital I

 (Not  signifying nothing.)

Saturday, October 19, 2013

The Forking

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

(Continued)

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060817-Tree.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The above figure is from “Special Topics,”
a post of August 17, 2006.  That post
contains the phrase

 a scholar at a Jesuit university.

James Joyce, the author discussed in
last night’s Green October post, might
be pleased to find there are still such
scholars.

Sunday, October 6, 2013

Sunday Dinner (continued)

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:00 PM

Judith Shulevitz in The New York Times
on Sunday, July 18, 2010
(quoted here Aug. 15, 2010) —

“What would an organic Christian Sabbath look like today?”

One possibility —

See also The Pride of Lowell  (Oct. 3, 2012)
and, a year later, The Hunt for Green October .

Friday, October 4, 2013

Walter’s Wake

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:12 PM

(Continued from October First)

"It gets to the end
We get to run it again"

— James Taylor,
    "One More Go Round" from
    New Moon Shine  album

Color News

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:48 PM

(Continued from yesterday's STEM and Truman Show.)

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Truman Show

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:16 PM

Part I: Paranoia

" 'The Truman Show' did not single-handedly cause
Truman delusions, any more than 'The Manchurian
Candidate' caused Cold War paranoia. In the fifteen
years since 'The Truman Show' was released, its
premise has increasingly come to seem nonbizarre."
— Andrew Marantz in The New Yorker
     issue dated Sept. 16, 2013, page 35

Part II: Amen

Part III: The Magic 8-Ball

Part IV: Sinking the Magic 8-Ball

Part V: The Color of Money

STEM

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:00 AM

“ ‘A babbled of green fields
— Phrase attributed to Shakespeare
quoted here on September 15th

From a New York Times  piece online today,
a quote promoting science and technology,
and a quote on aptitude :

the   STEM fields   (“STEM” being the current shorthand
for “science, technology, engineering and mathematics”),
which offer so much in the way of job prospects, prestige,
intellectual stimulation and income….

… scientific and mathematical aptitude at
the very highest end of the spectrum ….

From a post of June 9, 2013 :

… the MAA Spectrum  program —

Related material — yesterday’s posts  

  1. Post-Production
  2. Color News
  3. Noon News
  4. Knock, Knock, Knockin’
  5. Spectral Theory
  6. Bright Star

and today’s previous post.

See as well Mood Indigo.

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Spectral Theory

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 5:24 PM

Peter J. Cameron attributes failure of his usual
link to the NASA "Astronomy Picture of the Day"
(APOD) to the US government shutdown, and
gives a substitute link.

Here is yet another substitute link, this one
specifically to today's  picture —

"All the Colors of the Sun."

Related literary remarks by Nabokov —

Among the many exhilarating things Lake taught
was that the order of the solar spectrum is not
a closed circle but a spiral of tints from cadmium
red and oranges through a strontian yellow and a
pale paradisal green to cobalt blues and violets,
at which point the sequence does not grade into
red again but passes into another spiral, which
starts with a kind of lavender gray and goes on to
Cinderella shades transcending human perception.

Pnin

Color News

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:25 AM

See also "Red October" in this  journal.

Saturday, July 6, 2013

The People’s Tesseract*

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:57 AM

From Andries Brouwer

Image related, very loosely, to Falstaff's 'green fields'

* Related material:  Yesterday's evening post and The People's Cube
  (By the way, any  4×4 array is a tesseract .)

Friday, July 5, 2013

Mathematics and Narrative (continued)

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 6:01 PM

Short Story — (Click image for some details.)

IMAGE- Andries Brouwer and the Galois Tesseract

Parts of a longer story —

The Galois Tesseract and Priority.

Saturday, June 29, 2013

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Raven Light

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:40 AM

"…a fundamental cognitive ability known as 'fluid' intelligence: the capacity to solve novel problems, to learn, to reason, to see connections and to get to the bottom of things. …

…matrices are considered the gold standard of fluid-intelligence tests. Anyone who has taken an intelligence test has seen matrices like those used in the Raven’s: three rows, with three graphic items in each row, made up of squares, circles, dots or the like. Do the squares get larger as they move from left to right? Do the circles inside the squares fill in, changing from white to gray to black, as they go downward? One of the nine items is missing from the matrix, and the challenge is to find the underlying patterns— up, down and across— from six possible choices. Initially the solutions are readily apparent to most people, but they get progressively harder to discern. By the end of the test, most test takers are baffled."

— Dan Hurley, "Can You Make Yourself Smarter?," NY Times , April 18, 2012

See also "Raven Steals the Light" in this  journal.

Related material:

Plan 9 from MIT and, perhaps exemplifying crystallized  rather than fluid  intelligence, Black Diamond.

Thursday, November 1, 2012

For All Saints’ Day

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 5:31 AM

Conclusion of "The Storyteller," a story 
by Cynthia Zarin about author Madeleine L'Engle—

The New Yorker , April 12, 2004 —

Note the black diamond at the story's end.

Saturday, October 27, 2012

Many Mansions

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:27 AM

John M. Johansen, architect, who
reportedly died yesterday

"It wasn't until reading Carl Jung,
Joseph Campbell, and Thomas Merton
that I understood what a symbol really was."

johnmjohansen.com/Symbolism.html

"Nine is a vine."

Memory rhyme

(See also that phrase in this journal.)

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Versions

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:30 AM

Last night's quarter-to-three meditation
linked to one version of "Behind the Green Door."

For those who prefer less heavenly versions

Love Ghost

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:45 AM

Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story

is the title of an August 30, 2012, biography
of the late author David Foster Wallace. 
(See a Guardian  review.)

For example…

The Lovely Bones,  Telemark, and  Behind the Green Door.

“I have to break in my new suit
and limber up my muscles somehow,”
said Penny defensively. “One can’t
practice outdoors when there’s no snow.
Now watch this one, Mrs. Weems.
It’s called a telemark.”

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Labyrinth 23

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:00 PM

The title refers to a search (see below)
suggested by three things—

  1. David Foster Wallace biographer D. T. Max
    "There's a note in one of my files where he says something like,
    'Infinite Jest  was just a means to Mary Karr's end, as it were.' "

  2. "There is a body  on  the cross in my church ." —Mary Karr

  3. A body.

The search Labyrinth 23.

(Within the search results, note particularly the post "The Infinity Point.")

The Lovely Bones

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:48 PM

(Continued)

"… and crown thy good with brotherhood…"

"The brothers are charged with murder,
conspiracy to commit murder,
disposing a body,
and tampering with evidence,
according to police."

Monday, September 17, 2012

The Count

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:01 PM
 

… I saw a shadow
sliding around the ropes
to get at me. The referee
moved it back, and then
went over and picked up the count.
"One!" The fog was clearing.

I rose to a knee,
and at "nine" to my feet.

— Louis Simpson, "The Appointment"

Simpson reportedly died on Holy Cross Day.

That day in this journal—

IMAGE- Log24 posts 'Please Mister Please' and 'Plan 9'

Saturday, May 26, 2012

Talk Amongst Yourselves

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:33 PM

Hard Science Fiction weekend at Dragon Press Bookstore

Saturday May 26:
11am-noon Playing with the net up:
Hard Science Fiction in the era of
short attention spans, crowd-sourcing,
and rapid obsolescence
( Greg Benford, James Cambias, Kathryn Cramer)
….
3pm-4:30 Technological optimism and pessimism;
utopia and dystopia; happy endings & sad endings:
what do these oppositions have to do with one another?
Are they all the same thing? How are they different
from one another? Group discussion.

My own interests in this area include…

(Click image for some context)

IMAGE- 'The Stars My Destination' (with cover slightly changed)

    The above was adapted from a 1996 cover

IMAGE- PyrE on the 1996 Vintage Books cover of 'The Stars My Destination'

 Vintage Books, July 1996. Cover: Evan Gaffney.

For the significance of the flames, 
see PyrE in the book. For the significance
of the cube in the altered cover, see
The 2×2×2 Cube and The Diamond Archetype.

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

The Rising…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Notes on Mathematics and Narrative, continued

"the Citizen Kane of horror films"
Sarah Lawless quoting other reviews
in Saga of the Wicker Man,
cited here on September 7

"Frivolous as a willow on a tombstone"
— Robert Stone on "our secret culture" in A Flag for Sunrise

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101006-WickerMan.jpg

"world's wildfire, leave but ash"
— Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J.,
quoted here on October 4

Happy birthday, Britt.

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Thursday February 12, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:11 AM
Headliners

Today, many observe
the 200th anniversary
of the birth of two
noted philosophers
of death:
Charles Darwin and
Abraham Lincoln.

A fitting headline:

FAUST VIVIFIES DEATH
(Harvard Crimson ,
February 7, 2008)

Happy birthday,
Cotton Mather.

Robert Stone,
A Flag for Sunrise :

Willow on tombstone from Lachlan Cranswick's homepage in Melbourne, Australia

"Our secret culture is as frivolous as a willow on a tombstone. It's a wonderful thing– or it was. It was strong and dreadful, it was majestic and ruthless. It was a stranger to pity. And it's not for sale, ladies and gentlemen."

Sunday, May 25, 2008

Sunday May 25, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Wechsler Cubes

 "Confusion is nothing new."
— Song lyric, Cyndi Lauper  

Part I:
Magister Ludi

Hermann Hesse's 1943 The Glass Bead Game (Picador paperback, Dec. 6, 2002, pp. 139-140)–

"For the present, the Master showed him a bulky memorandum, a proposal he had received from an organist– one of the innumerable proposals which the directorate of the Game regularly had to examine. Usually these were suggestions for the admission of new material to the Archives. One man, for example, had made a meticulous study of the history of the madrigal and discovered in the development of the style a curved that he had expressed both musically and mathematically, so that it could be included in the vocabulary of the Game. Another had examined the rhythmic structure of Julius Caesar's Latin and discovered the most striking congruences with the results of well-known studies of the intervals in Byzantine hymns. Or again some fanatic had once more unearthed some new cabala hidden in the musical notation of the fifteenth century. Then there were the tempestuous letters from abstruse experimenters who could arrive at the most astounding conclusions from, say, a comparison of the horoscopes of Goethe and Spinoza; such letters often included pretty and seemingly enlightening geometric drawings in several colors."

Part II:
A Bulky Memorandum

From Siri Hustvedt, author of Mysteries of the Rectangle: Essays on Painting (Princeton Architectural Press, 2005)– What I Loved: A Novel (Picador paperback, March 1, 2004, page 168)–

A description of the work of Bill Wechsler, a fictional artist:

"Bill worked long hours on a series of autonomous pieces about numbers. Like O's Journey, the works took place inside glass cubes, but these were twice as large– about two feet square. He drew his inspiration from sources as varied as the Cabbala, physics, baseball box scores, and stock market reports. He painted, cut, sculpted, distorted, and broke the numerical signs in each work until they became unrecognizable. He included figures, objects, books, windows, and always the written word for the number. It was rambunctious art, thick with allusion– to voids, blanks, holes, to monotheism and the individual, the the dialectic and yin-yang, to the Trinity, the three fates, and three wishes, to the golden rectangle, to seven heavens, the seven lower orders of the sephiroth, the nine Muses, the nine circles of Hell, the nine worlds of Norse mythology, but also to popular references like A Better Marriage in Five Easy Lessons and Thinner Thighs in Seven Days. Twelve-step programs were referred to in both cube one and cube two. A miniature copy of a book called The Six Mistakes Parents Make Most Often lay at the bottom of cube six. Puns appeared, usually well disguised– one, won; two, too, and Tuesday; four, for, forth; ate, eight. Bill was partial to rhymes as well, both in images and words. In cube nine, the geometric figure for a line had been painted on one glass wall. In cube three, a tiny man wearing the black-and-white prison garb of cartoons and dragging a leg iron has

— End of page 168 —

opened the door to his cell. The hidden rhyme is "free." Looking closely through the walls of the cube, one can see the parallel rhyme in another language: the German word drei is scratched into one glass wall. Lying at the bottom of the same box is a tiny black-and-white photograph cut from a book that shows the entrance to Auschwitz: ARBEIT MACHT FREI. With every number, the arbitrary dance of associations worked togethere to create a tiny mental landscape that ranged in tone from wish-fulfillment dream to nightmare. Although dense, the effect of the cubes wasn't visually disorienting. Each object, painting, drawing, bit of text, or sculpted figure found its rightful place under the glass according to the necessary, if mad, logic of numerical, pictorial, and verbal connection– and the colors of each were startling. Every number had been given a thematic hue. Bill had been interested in Goethe's color wheel and in Alfred Jensen's use of it in his thick, hallucinatory paintings of numbers. He had assigned each number a color. Like Goethe, he included black and white, although he didn't bother with the poet's meanings. Zero and one were white. Two was blue. Three was red, four was yellow, and he mixed colors: pale blue for five, purples in six, oranges in seven, greens in eight, and blacks and grays in nine. Although other colors and omnipresent newsprint always intruded on the basic scheme, the myriad shades of a single color dominated each cube.

The number pieces were the work of a man at the top of his form. An organic extension of everything Bill had done before, these knots of symbols had an explosive effect. The longer I looked at them, the more the miniature constructions seemed on the brink of bursting from internal pressure. They were tightly orchestrated semantic bombs through which Bill laid bare the arbitrary roots of meaning itself– that peculiar social contract generated by little squiggles, dashes, lines, and loops on a page."

Part III:
Wechsler Cubes

(named not for
Bill Wechsler, the
fictional artist above,
but for the non-fictional
   David Wechsler) —

From 2002:

Above: Dr. Harrison Pope, Harvard professor of psychiatry, demonstrates the use of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale "block design" subtest.


Part IV:
A Magic Gallery
 
Log24, March 4, 2004
 

ZZ
WW

Figures from the
Kaleidoscope Puzzle
of Steven H. Cullinane:


Poem by Eugen Jost:
Zahlen und Zeichen,
Wörter und Worte

Mit Zeichen und Zahlen
vermessen wir Himmel und Erde
schwarz
auf weiss
schaffen wir neue Welten
oder gar Universen


 Numbers and Names,
Wording and Words


With numbers and names
we measure heaven and earth
black
on white
we create new worlds
and universes


English translation
by Catherine Schelbert



A related poem:

Alphabets
by Hermann Hesse

From time to time
we take our pen in hand
and scribble symbols
on a blank white sheet
Their meaning is
at everyone's command;
it is a game whose rules
are nice and neat.

But if a savage
or a moon-man came
and found a page,
a furrowed runic field,
and curiously studied
lines and frame:
How strange would be
the world that they revealed.
a magic gallery of oddities.
He would see A and B
as man and beast,
as moving tongues or
arms or legs or eyes,
now slow, now rushing,
all constraint released,
like prints of ravens'
feet upon the snow.
He'd hop about with them,
fly to and fro,
and see a thousand worlds
of might-have-been
hidden within the black
and frozen symbols,
beneath the ornate strokes,
the thick and thin.
He'd see the way love burns
and anguish trembles,
He'd wonder, laugh,
shake with fear and weep
because beyond this cipher's
cross-barred keep
he'd see the world
in all its aimless passion,
diminished, dwarfed, and
spellbound in the symbols,
and rigorously marching
prisoner-fashion.
He'd think: each sign
all others so resembles
that love of life and death,
or lust and anguish,
are simply twins whom
no one can distinguish…
until at last the savage
with a sound
of mortal terror
lights and stirs a fire,
chants and beats his brow
against the ground
and consecrates the writing
to his pyre.
Perhaps before his
consciousness is drowned
in slumber there will come
to him some sense
of how this world
of magic fraudulence,
this horror utterly
behind endurance,
has vanished as if
it had never been.
He'll sigh, and smile,
and feel all right again.

— Hermann Hesse (1943),
"Buchstaben," from
Das Glasperlenspiel,
translated by
Richard and Clara Winston

Saturday, May 12, 2007

Saturday May 12, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Artistic Vision

Last night's entry "A Midrash for Hollywood" discussed a possible interpretation of yesterday's Pennsylvania Lottery numbers– mid-day 384, evening 952.

In memory of a blacklisted Hollywood screenwriter who died yesterday, here is another interpretation of those numbers.

First, though, it seems appropriate to quote again the anonymous source from "Heaven, Hell, and Hollywood" on screenwriters– "You can be replaced by some Ping Pong balls and a dictionary."  An example was given illustrating this saying.  Here is another example:

Yesterday's PA lottery numbers in the dictionary–

Webster's New World Dictionary,
College Edition, 1960–

Page 384: "Defender of the Faith"
Related Log24 entries:
"To Announce a Faith," Halloween 2006,
and earlier Log24 entries from
that year's Halloween season

Page 952: "monolith"
Related Log24 entries:
"Shema, Israel," and "Punch Line"
(with the four entries that preceded it).

It may not be entirely irrelevant that a headline in last night's entry– "Lonesome No More!"– was linked to a discussion of Kurt Vonnegut's Slapstick, that a film version of that novel starred Jerry Lewis, and that yesterday afternoon's entry quoted a vision of "an Ingmar Bergman script as directed by Jerry Lewis."

 

See also April 7, 2003:

 

April is Math Awareness Month.
This year's theme is "mathematics and art."

"Art isn't easy."
— Stephen Sondheim    

Wednesday, March 9, 2005

Wednesday March 9, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 4:02 AM
Women's History Month,
continued:

American Activities

Col. Mary A. Hallaren,
a much-decorated WW II veteran and
head of the Women's Army Corps,
died on Feb. 13, 2005.

 

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050309-Rooster.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
             U.S. Army Photo
Col. Mary A. Hallaren in 1950.

Happy Year of the Rooster.

"The entertaining script was adapted from the novel by Charles Portis, by well-known, long time writer, Marguerite Roberts who liked to write scripts for tough men. She wrote scripts for MGM in the '30's, '40's, until she was blacklisted in 1952, for not revealing names to The Committee on Un-American Activities."

Friday, September 17, 2004

Friday September 17, 2004

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

God is in…
The Details

From an entry for Aug. 19, 2003 on
conciseness, simplicity, and objectivity:

Above: Dr. Harrison Pope, Harvard professor of psychiatry, demonstrates the use of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale "block design" subtest.

Another Harvard psychiatrist, Armand Nicholi, is in the news lately with his book The Question of God: C.S. Lewis and Sigmund Freud Debate God, Love, Sex, and the Meaning of Life.

Pope

Nicholi

Old
Testament
Logos

New
Testament
Logos

For the meaning of the Old-Testament logos above, see the remarks of Plato on the immortality of the soul at

Cut-the-Knot.org.

For the meaning of the New-Testament logos above, see the remarks of R. P. Langlands at

The Institute for Advanced Study.

On Harvard and psychiatry: see

The Crimson Passion:
A Drama at Mardi Gras

(February 24, 2004)

This is a reductio ad absurdum of the Harvard philosophy so eloquently described by Alston Chase in his study of Harvard and the making of the Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski.  Kaczynski's time at Harvard overlapped slightly with mine, so I may have seen him in Cambridge at some point.  Chase writes that at Harvard, the Unabomber "absorbed the message of positivism, which demanded value-neutral reasoning and preached that (as Kaczynski would later express it in his journal) 'there is no logical justification for morality.'" I was less impressed by Harvard positivism, although I did benefit from a course in symbolic logic from Quine.  At that time– the early 60's– little remained at Harvard of what Robert Stone has called "our secret culture," that of the founding Puritans– exemplified by Cotton and Increase Mather.

From Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise:

"Our secret culture is as frivolous as a willow on a tombstone.  It's a wonderful thing– or it was.  It was strong and dreadful, it was majestic and ruthless.  It was a stranger to pity.  And it's not for sale, ladies and gentlemen."

Some traces of that culture:

A web page
in Australia:

A contemporary
Boston author:

Click on pictures for details.

A more appealing view of faith was offered by PBS on Wednesday night, the beginning of this year's High Holy Days:

Armand Nicholi: But how can you believe something that you don't think is true, I mean, certainly, an intelligent person can't embrace something that they don't think is true — that there's something about us that would object to that.

Jeremy Fraiberg: Well, the answer is, they probably do believe it's true.

Armand Nicholi: But how do they get there? See, that's why both Freud and Lewis was very interested in that one basic question. Is there an intelligence beyond the universe? And how do we answer that question? And how do we arrive at the answer of that question?

Michael Shermer: Well, in a way this is an empirical question, right? Either there is or there isn't.

Armand Nicholi: Exactly.

Michael Shermer: And either we can figure it out or we can't, and therefore, you just take the leap of faith or you don't.

Armand Nicholi: Yeah, now how can we figure it out?

Winifred Gallagher: I think something that was perhaps not as common in their day as is common now — this idea that we're acting as if belief and unbelief were two really radically black and white different things, and I think for most people, there's a very — it's a very fuzzy line, so that —

Margaret Klenck: It's always a struggle.

Winifred Gallagher: Rather than — I think there's some days I believe, and some days I don't believe so much, or maybe some days I don't believe at all.

Doug Holladay: Some hours.

Winifred Gallagher: It's a, it's a process. And I think for me the big developmental step in my spiritual life was that — in some way that I can't understand or explain that God is right here right now all the time, everywhere.

Armand Nicholi: How do you experience that?

Winifred Gallagher: I experience it through a glass darkly, I experience it in little bursts. I think my understanding of it is that it's, it's always true, and sometimes I can see it and sometimes I can't. Or sometimes I remember that it's true, and then everything is in Technicolor. And then most of the time it's not, and I have to go on faith until the next time I can perhaps see it again. I think of a divine reality, an ultimate reality, uh, would be my definition of God.

Winifred
Gallagher

Sangaku

Gallagher seemed to be the only participant in the PBS discussion that came close to the Montessori ideals of conciseness, simplicity, and objectivity.  Dr. Montessori intended these as ideals for teachers, but they seem also to be excellent religious values.  Just as the willow-tombstone seems suited to Geoffrey Hill's style, the Pythagorean sangaku pictured above seems appropriate to the admirable Gallagher.

Thursday, March 13, 2003

Thursday March 13, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 5:24 AM

Death Knell

In memory of Howard Fast, novelist and Jewish former Communist,
who died yesterday, a quotation:

"For many of us, the geometry course sounded the death knell
for our progress — and interest — in mathematics."

— "Shape and Space in Geometry"

© 1997-2003 Annenberg/CPB. All rights reserved.
Legal Policy

See also
Geometry for Jews.

Added March 16, 2003: See, too, the life of
John Sanford, blacklisted Jewish writer,
who died on March 6, 2003 —
Michelangelo's birthday and the date of
"
Geometry for Jews."

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