Log24

Sunday, September 22, 2019

Colorful Tale

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:59 PM

“Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature of modern science
is the emergence of abstract symbolic structures as the hard core
of objectivity behind— as Eddington puts it— the colorful tale of
the subjective storyteller mind.”

— Hermann WeylPhilosophy of  Mathematics and
    Natural Science 
, Princeton, 1949, p. 237

"The bond with reality is cut."

— Hans Freudenthal, 1962

Indeed it is.

From page 180, Logicomix — It was a dark and stormy night

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110420-DarkAndStormy-Logicomix.jpg

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Colorful Tales

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:23 PM

“Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature of modern science
is the emergence of abstract symbolic structures as the hard core
of objectivity behind— as Eddington puts it— the colorful tale of
the subjective storyteller mind.”

— Hermann WeylPhilosophy of  Mathematics and
    Natural Science 
, Princeton, 1949, p. 237

Harvard University Press on the late Angus Fletcher, author of
The Topological Imagination  and Colors of the Mind

From the Harvard webpage for Colors of the Mind

Angus Fletcher is one of our finest theorists of the arts,
the heir to I. A. Richards, Erich Auerbach, Northrop Frye.
This… book…  aims to open another field of study:
how thought— the act, the experience of thinking—
is represented in literature.

. . . .

Fletcher’s resources are large, and his step is sure.
The reader samples his piercing vision of Milton’s

Satan, the original Thinker,
leaving the pain of thinking
as his legacy for mankind.

A 1992 review by Vinay Dharwadker of Colors of the Mind —

See also the above word "dianoia" in The Echo in Plato's Cave.
Some context 

This post was suggested by a memorial piece today in
the Los Angeles Review of Books

A Florilegium for Angus Fletcher

By Kenneth Gross, Lindsay Waters, V. N. Alexander,
Paul Auster, Harold Bloom, Stanley Fish, K. J. Knoespel,
Mitchell Meltzer, Victoria Nelson, Joan Richardson,
Dorian Sagan, Susan Stewart, Eric Wilson, Michael Wood

Fletcher reportedly died on November 28, 2016.

"I learned from Fletcher how to apprehend
the daemonic element in poetic imagination."

— Harold Bloom in today's Los Angeles florilegium

For more on Bloom and the daemonic, see a Log24 post,
"Interpenetration," from the date of Fletcher's death.

Some backstory:  Dharwadker in this journal.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Colorful Tale

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

(A sequel to yesterday's ART WARS and this
morning's De Colores )

“Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature
of modern science is the emergence of abstract
symbolic structures as the hard core of objectivity
behind– as Eddington puts it– the colorful tale
of the subjective storyteller mind.” — Hermann Weyl
(Philosophy of  Mathematics and Natural Science ,
Princeton, 1949, p. 237)

See also Deathly Hallows.

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Colorful Tale

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:45 AM

Continued.

"Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature
of modern science is the emergence of abstract
symbolic structures as the hard core of objectivity
behind— as Eddington puts it— the colorful tale
of the subjective storyteller mind."

— Hermann Weyl in Philosophy of Mathematics
     and Natural Science
 , Princeton, 1949, p. 237

Tom Wolfe on art theorists in The Painted Word  (1975) :

"It is important to repeat that Greenberg and Rosenberg
did not create their theories in a vacuum or simply turn up
with them one day like tablets brought down from atop
Green Mountain or Red Mountain (as B. H. Friedman once
called the two men). As tout le monde  understood, they
were not only theories but … hot news,
straight from the studios, from the scene."

The Weyl quote is a continuing theme in this journal.
The Wolfe quote appeared here on Nov. 18, 2014,
the reported date of death of Yale graduate student 
Natasha Chichilnisky-Heal.

Directions to her burial (see yesterday evening) include
a mention of "Paul Robson Street" (actually Paul
Robeson Place) near "the historic Princeton Cemetery."

This, together with the remarks by Tom Wolfe posted
here on the reported day of her death, suggests a search
for "red green black" —

The late Chichilnisky-Heal was a student of political economy.

The search colors may be interpreted, if one likes, as referring
to politics (red), economics (green), and Robeson (black).

See also Robeson in this journal.

Saturday, September 17, 2011

The Uploading

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:32 AM

(Continued from March 9.)

A detail from "Feist Sings 1, 2, 3, 4"—

"Uploaded by SesameStreet on Jul 18, 2008"

Those who prefer, as Weyl put it,
"
the hard core of objectivity"
to, as Eddington put it,
"the colorful tale of the subjective storyteller mind"
may consult this journal on the same day… July 18, 2008.

Saturday, July 19, 2008

Saturday July 19, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 2:00 PM
Hard Core

(continued from yesterday)

Bertram Kostant, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at MIT, on an object discussed in this week’s New Yorker:

A word about E(8). In my opinion, and shared by others, E(8) is the most magnificent ‘object’ in all of mathematics. It is like a diamond with thousands of facets. Each facet offering a different view of its unbelievable intricate internal structure.”

Hermann Weyl on the hard core of objectivity:

“Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature of modern science is the emergence of abstract symbolic structures as the hard core of objectivity behind– as Eddington puts it– the colorful tale of the subjective storyteller mind.” (Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science, Princeton, 1949, p. 237)


Steven H. Cullinane on the symmetries of a 4×4 array of points:

A Structure-Endowed Entity

“A guiding principle in modern mathematics is this lesson: Whenever you have to do with a structure-endowed entity S, try to determine its group of automorphisms, the group of those element-wise transformations which leave all structural relations undisturbed.  You can expect to gain a deep insight into the constitution of S in this way.”

— Hermann Weyl in Symmetry

Let us apply Weyl’s lesson to the following “structure-endowed entity.”

4x4 array of dots

What is the order of the resulting group of automorphisms?

The above group of
automorphisms plays
a role in what Weyl,
following Eddington,
  called a “colorful tale”–

The Diamond 16 Puzzle

The Diamond 16 Puzzle

This puzzle shows
that the 4×4 array can
also be viewed in
thousands of ways.

“You can make 322,560
pairs of patterns. Each
 pair pictures a different
symmetry of the underlying
16-point space.”

— Steven H. Cullinane,
July 17, 2008

For other parts of the tale,
see Ashay Dharwadker,
the Four-Color Theorem,
and Usenet Postings
.

Friday, July 18, 2008

Friday July 18, 2008

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Hard Core

David Corfield quotes Weyl in a weblog entry, "Hierarchy and Emergence," at the n-Category Cafe this morning:

"Perhaps the philosophically most relevant feature of modern science is the emergence of abstract symbolic structures as the hard core of objectivity behind– as Eddington puts it– the colorful tale of the subjective storyteller mind." (Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science [Princeton, 1949], p. 237)

For the same quotation in a combinatorial context, see the foreword by A. W. Tucker, "Combinatorial Problems," to a special issue of the IBM Journal of Research and Development, November 1960 (1-page pdf).

See also yesterday's Log24 entry.
 

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