Log24

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

The Relativity Problem and Burkard Polster

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:28 AM
 

From some 1949 remarks of Weyl—

"The relativity problem is one of central significance throughout geometry and algebra and has been recognized as such by the mathematicians at an early time."

— Hermann Weyl, "Relativity Theory as a Stimulus in Mathematical Research," Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society , Vol. 93, No. 7, Theory of Relativity in Contemporary Science: Papers Read at the Celebration of the Seventieth Birthday of Professor Albert Einstein in Princeton, March 19, 1949  (Dec. 30, 1949), pp. 535-541

Weyl in 1946—:

"This is the relativity problem: to fix objectively a class of equivalent coordinatizations and to ascertain the group of transformations S mediating between them."

— Hermann Weyl, The Classical Groups , Princeton University Press, 1946, p. 16

For some context, see Relativity Problem  in this journal.

In the case of PG(3,2), there is a choice of geometric models 
to be coordinatized: two such models are the traditional
tetrahedral model long promoted by Burkard Polster, and
the square model of Steven H. Cullinane.

The above Wikipedia section tacitly (and unfairly) assumes that
the model being coordinatized is the tetrahedral model. For
coordinatization of the square model, see (for instance) the webpage
Finite Relativity.

For comparison of the two models, see a figure posted here on
May 21, 2014 —

Labeling the Tetrahedral Model  (Click to enlarge) —

"Citation needed" —

The anonymous characters who often update the PG(3,2) Wikipedia article
probably would not consider my post of 2014, titled "The Tetrahedral
Model of PG(3,2)
," a "reliable source."

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

A Block Design 3-(16,4,1) as a Steiner Quadruple System:

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:19 AM

A Midrash for Wikipedia 

Midrash —

Related material —


________________________________________________________________________________

The Miracle Octad Generator (MOG), the affine 4-space over GF(2), and the Cullinane diamond theorem

Saturday, March 2, 2019

Wikipedia Scholarship (Continued):

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:21 AM

Ignotum per Ignotius

A Log24 post from yesterday afternoon has the following —

Commentary —

Friday, March 1, 2019

Wikipedia Scholarship (Continued)

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:45 PM

This post continues a post from yesterday on the square model of
PG(3,2) that apparently first appeared (presented as such*) in . . .

Cullinane, "Symmetry invariance in a diamond ring,"
Notices of the AMS , pp. A193-194, Feb. 1979.

The Cullinane diamond theorem, AMS Notices, Feb. 1979, pp. A-193-194

Yesterday's Wikipedia presentation of the square model was today
revised by yet another anonymous author —

Revision history accounting for the above change from yesterday —

The jargon "rm OR" means "remove original research."

The added verbiage about block designs is a smokescreen having
nothing to do with the subject, which is square  representation
of the 35 points and lines.

* The 35 squares, each consisting of four 4-element subsets, appeared earlier
   in the Miracle Octad Generator (MOG) of R. T. Curtis (published in 1976).
  They were not at that time  presented as constituting a finite geometry, 
  either affine (AG(4,2)) or projective (PG(3,2)).

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Wikipedia Scholarship

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:31 PM

Cullinane's Square Model of PG(3,2)

Besides omitting the name Cullinane, the anonymous Wikipedia author
also omitted the step of representing the hypercube by a 4×4 array —
an array called in this  journal a Galois  tesseract.

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Construction of PG(3,2) from K6

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 11:38 AM

From this journal on April 23, 2013

IMAGE- Geometry of the Six-Set, Steven H. Cullinane, April 23, 2013

From this journal in 2003

From Wikipedia on Groundhog Day, 2019

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Citation

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Some related material in this journal — See a search for k6.gif.

Some related material from Harvard —

Elkies'  "15 simple transpositions" clearly correspond to the 15 edges of
the complete graph K6 and to the 15  2-subsets of a 6-set.

For the connection to PG(3,2), see Finite Geometry of the Square and Cube.

The following "manifestation" of the 2-subsets of a 6-set might serve as
the desired Wikipedia citation —

See also the above 1986 construction of PG(3,2) from a 6-set
in the work of other authors in 1994 and 2002 . . .

IMAGE- Dolgachev and Keum, coordinatization of the 4x4 array in 'Birational Automorphisms of Quartic Hessian Surfaces,' AMS Transactions, 2002

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