Log24

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Provocative Exhibitions

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 1:02 PM

Wikipedia on a figure from the previous post

" Antonelli  was recognized with an AIGA Medal in 2015
for 'expanding the influence of design in everyday life
by sharing fresh and incisive observations and
curating provocative exhibitions at MoMA'.[4] She was
rated one of the one hundred most powerful people in
the world of art by Art Review and Surface Magazine.[5]  "

Speaking of exhibitions —

Monday, November 20, 2017

Dating Charlie*

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 PM

Washington Post  dateline . . .

November 20 at 6:34 PM

Address . . .

https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/
eight-women-say-charlie-rose-sexually-harassed-them–
with-nudity-groping-and-lewd-calls/2017/11/20/ . . .

See also Charlie Rose in this  journal.

The only post found in a Log24 search for "Charlie Rose" is about
his May 7, 2008, interview with a Museum of Modern Art figure,
Paola Antonelli.  A more recent appearance by Antonelli —

Synchronolgy check — Log24 on the date 5 June 2012.

* Title and wording of post revised the following day.

Sunday, October 9, 2011

Beautiful Failure

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 3:57 AM

"Design is how it works." — Steven Jobs

A comment on the life of Jobs —

Paola Antonelli, curator of 'Design and the Elastic Mind' at MoMA

Paola Antonelli
Photo Credit: Andrea Ciotti

Paola Antonelli, senior curator of architecture and design
at the Museum of Modern Art in New York—

NeXT was a risk and a beautiful failure."

Related material—

What’s NeXT?

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111006-NeXT-logo.jpg

and 2008 posts of

 May 8May 9, and May 10.

"Math class is  tough, Barbie."

Saturday, May 10, 2008

Saturday May 10, 2008

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 8:00 AM
MoMA Goes to
Kindergarten

"… the startling thesis of Mr. Brosterman's new book, 'Inventing Kindergarten' (Harry N. Abrams, $39.95): that everything the giants of modern art and architecture knew about abstraction they learned in kindergarten, thanks to building blocks and other educational toys designed by Friedrich Froebel, a German educator, who coined the term 'kindergarten' in the 1830's."

— "Was Modernism Born
     in Toddler Toolboxes?"
     by Trip Gabriel, New York Times,
     April 10, 1997
 

RELATED MATERIAL

Figure 1 —
Concept from 1819:

Cubic crystal system
(Footnotes 1 and 2)

Figure 2 —
The Third Gift, 1837:

Froebel's third gift

Froebel's Third Gift

Froebel, the inventor of
kindergarten, worked as
an assistant to the
crystallographer Weiss
mentioned in Fig. 1.

(Footnote 3)

Figure 3 —
The Third Gift, 1906:

Seven partitions of the eightfold cube in a book from 1906

Figure 4 —
Solomon's Cube,
1981 and 1983:

Solomon's Cube - A 1981 design by Steven H. Cullinane

Figure 5 —
Design Cube, 2006:

Design Cube 4x4x4 by Steven H. Cullinane

The above screenshot shows a
moveable JavaScript display
of a space of six dimensions
(over the two-element field).

(To see how the display works,
try the Kaleidoscope Puzzle first.)

For some mathematical background, see

Footnotes:
 
1. Image said to be after Holden and Morrison, Crystals and Crystal Growing, 1982
2. Curtis Schuh, "The Library: Biobibliography of Mineralogy," article on Mohs
3. Bart Kahr, "Crystal Engineering in Kindergarten" (pdf), Crystal Growth & Design, Vol. 4 No. 1, 2004, 3-9

Friday, May 9, 2008

Friday May 9, 2008

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 10:31 AM
Cubist Language Game

"Philosophers ponder the idea
 of identity: what it is to give
 something a name on Monday
 and have it respond to 
  that name on Friday…."

Bernard Holland 

Monday:

From Log24 on
August 19, 2003
and on
Ash Wednesday, 2004:
a reviewer on
An Instance of the Fingerpost::

"Perhaps we are meant to
 see the story as a cubist
 retelling of the crucifixion."

Related material
for today's anniversay
of the birth of philosopher
Jose Ortega y Gasset:

Cubism as Multispeech
and
Halloween Meditations
(illustrated below)

Cover of 'The Gameplayers of Zan,' by M.A. Foster

"Modern art…
will always have
the masses against it."
Ortega y Gasset, 1925    

Thursday, May 8, 2008

Thursday May 8, 2008

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM
Synchronicity

Today is the feast of
Saint Robert A. Heinlein.

Time of the above: 1:00 PM.
Update of 2:07 PM —

On the local Charlie Rose broadcast today at about 1:48 PM, Paola Antonelli, the organizer of an exhibit at MoMA, "Design and the Elastic Mind," talked about science fiction's influence (or non-influence) on the exhibit. She used the metaphor "the day after tomorrow." As I had just written a link relating design, science fiction, and May 10 (the date of the literal day after tomorrow– click on "feast" above), I found her remarks of interest. Here is a related passage from a web page.
 

Paola Antonelli, curator of 'Design and the Elastic Mind' at MoMA
Paola Antonelli

Photo Credit: Andrea Ciotti

Antonelli on scientists as designers who do not call themselves designers:

"So they all try to reach out. They have that in common. Then what they have in common is this attempt to… propose something for the real future. I don't really like science fiction, but I like to think of tomorrow and the day after tomorrow."

Amen.

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