Log24

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Icon Parking

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 AM

For the title, see Icon Parking in a search for 54th  in this journal.

For related iconic remarks, click on either image below.

  .

This post was suggested by the Dec. 30, 2016, date of the
death in Nuremberg of mathematician Wolf Barth.  The first
image above is from a mathematics-related work by
John von Neumann discussed here on that date.

See also Wolf Barth in this journal for posts that largely
concern not the above Barth, but an artist of the same name.
For posts on the mathematician only, see Barth + Kummer.

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Art and Space…

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 6:00 AM

Continues, in memory of chess grandmaster Viktor Korchnoi,
who reportedly died at 85 yesterday in Switzerland —

IMAGE- Spielfeld (1982-83), by Wolf Barth

The coloring of the 4×4 "base" in the above image
suggests St. Bridget's cross.

From this journal on St. Bridget's Day this year —

"Possible title: 

A new graphic approach 
to an old geometric approach
to a new combinatorial approach
to an old algebraic approach
to M24
"

The narrative leap from image to date may be regarded as
an example of "knight's move" thinking.

Saturday, April 9, 2016

Expanding the Spielfeld (continued)

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 PM

"Mr. Conrad was relentless and rigorous in expanding
the parameters of the fields in which he worked."

The New York Times  today

See also Spielfeld in this  journal, as well as Conrad Moonshine.

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Romanesque

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:20 PM

From New York Times  obituary
of Ellsworth Kelly by Holland Cotter —

"The anonymous role of
the Romanesque church artist
remained a model."

See as well 

Note the contradiction between the URL date (last Monday's)
and the printed date below it (that of Epiphany 2016).
 

Who's trolling whom?

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

The Barth Spielfeld

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:23 PM

For some backstory, search Log24 for "Wolf Barth."

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Epiphany for Jews

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:29 AM

A quarter to three

and a philosopher's Stone —

Sunday, December 27, 2015

Rigorous Imagist*

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 PM

The death of a well-known artist today suggested
a search for Pythagorean Stone in this journal.

An image from that search, together with a sentence
from his obituary, may serve as a memorial.

From a New York Times  obituary
by Holland Cotter tonight —

"The anonymous role of
the Romanesque church artist
remained a model."

* For the title, see the two previous posts.

Sunday, August 30, 2015

Lines

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:01 AM

"We tell ourselves stories in order to live." — Joan Didion

A post from St. Augustine's day, 2015, may serve to
illustrate this.

The post started with a look at a painting by Swiss artist
Wolf Barth, "Spielfeld." The painting portrays two
rectangular arrays, of four and of twelve subsquares, 
that sit atop a square array of sixteen subsquares.

To one familiar with Euclid's "bride's chair" proof of the
Pythagorean theorem, "Spielfeld" suggests a right triangle
with squares on its sides of areas 4, 12, and 16.

That image in turn suggests a diagram illustrating the fact
that a triangle suitably inscribed in a half-circle is a right 
triangle… in this case, a right triangle with angles of 30, 60,
and 90 degrees… Thus —

In memory of screenwriter John Gregory Dunne (husband
of Joan Didion and author of, among other things, The Studio
here is a cinematric approach to the above figure.

The half-circle at top suggests the dome of an observatory.
This in turn suggests a scene from the 2014 film "Magic in
the Moonlight."  

As she gazes at the silent universe above
through an opening in the dome, the silent
Emma Stone is perhaps thinking, 
prompted by her work with Spider-Man

"Drop me a line."

As he  gazes at the crack in the dome,
Stone's costar Colin Firth contrasts the vastness 
of the Universe with the smallness of Man, citing 

"the tiny field F2 with two elements."

In conclusion, recall the words of author Norman Mailer
that summarized his Harvard education —

"At times, bullshit can only be countered
with superior bullshit."

Saturday, August 29, 2015

Quality Revisited

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:14 AM

From earlier this month —

Related material —

1991 Swiss commemorative stamp with painting by Wolf Barth

Friday, August 28, 2015

Art and Space

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:00 AM

IMAGE- Spielfeld (1982-83), by Wolf Barth
 

            Observatory scene from "Magic in the Moonlight"

"The sixteen nodes… can be parametrized
by the sixteen points in affine four-space
over the tiny field F2 with two elements."

Wolf Barth

Saturday, July 4, 2015

Context

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:00 AM

Some context for yesterday's post on a symplectic polarity —

This 1986 note may or may not have inspired some remarks 
of Wolf Barth in his foreword to the 1990 reissue of Hudson's
1905 Kummer's Quartic Surface .

See also the diamond-theorem correlation.  

Saturday, June 20, 2015

Conceptual Art for Basel

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 7:59 PM

The previous post's link to The Lindbergh Manifesto
and Thursday's post on Basel-born artist Wolf Barth 
suggest the following —

See as well a June 14 New York Times
piece on Art Basel.

The logo of the University of Basel 

suggests a review of The Holy Field —

 .

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Expanding the Spielraum

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:25 PM

(Continued from Feb. 3, 2015)

IMAGE- Spielfeld (1982-83), by Wolf Barth

The above artist  Wolf Barth is not the same person
as the mathematician  Wolf Barth quoted in the 
previous post.  For further background on the artist, see
an article in Neue Zürcher Zeitung  from Nov. 15, 2013.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Slow Art, Continued

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 10:01 AM

The title of the previous post, "Slow Art," is a phrase
of the late art critic Robert Hughes.

Example from mathematics:

  • Göpel tetrads as subsets of a 4×4 square in the classic
    1905 book Kummer's Quartic Surface  by R. W. H. T. Hudson.
    These subsets were constructed as helpful schematic diagrams,
    without any reference to the concept of finite  geometry they
    were later to embody.
     
  • Göpel tetrads (not then named as such), again as subsets of
    a 4×4 square, that form the 15 isotropic projective lines of the
    finite projective 3-space PG(3,2) in a note on finite geometry
    from 1986 —

    Göpel tetrads in an inscape, April 1986

  • Göpel tetrads as these figures of finite  geometry in a 1990
    foreword to the reissued 1905 book of Hudson:

IMAGE- Galois geometry in Wolf Barth's 1990 foreword to Hudson's 1905 'Kummer's Quartic Surface'

Click the Barth passage to see it with its surrounding text.

Related material:

Saturday, September 21, 2013

Mathematics and Narrative (continued)

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 AM

Mathematics:

A review of posts from earlier this month —

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Moonshine

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Unexpected connections between areas of mathematics
previously thought to be unrelated are sometimes referred
to as "moonshine."  An example—  the apparent connections
between parts of complex analysis and groups related to the
large Mathieu group M24. Some recent work on such apparent
connections, by Anne Taormina and Katrin Wendland, among
others (for instance, Miranda C.N. Cheng and John F.R. Duncan),
involves structures related to Kummer surfaces .
In a classic book, Kummer's Quartic Surface  (1905),
R.W.H.T. Hudson pictured a set of 140 structures, the 80
Rosenhain tetrads and the 60 Göpel tetrads, as 4-element
subsets of a 16-element 4×4 array.  It turns out that these
140 structures are the planes of the finite affine geometry
AG(4,2) of four dimensions over the two-element Galois field.
(See Diamond Theory in 1937.)

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Moonshine II

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags:  — m759 @ 10:31 AM

(Continued from yesterday)

The foreword by Wolf Barth in the 1990 Cambridge U. Press
reissue of Hudson's 1905 classic Kummer's Quartic Surface
covers some of the material in yesterday's post Moonshine.

The distinction that Barth described in 1990 was also described, and illustrated,
in my 1986 note "Picturing the smallest projective 3-space."  The affine 4-space
over the the finite Galois field GF(2) that Barth describes was earlier described—
within a 4×4 array like that pictured by Hudson in 1905— in a 1979 American
Mathematical Society abstract, "Symmetry invariance in a diamond ring."

"The distinction between Rosenhain and Goepel tetrads
is nothing but the distinction between isotropic and
non-isotropic planes in this affine space over the finite field."

The 1990 paragraph of Barth quoted above may be viewed as a summary
of these facts, and also of my March 17, 2013, note "Rosenhain and Göpel
Tetrads in PG(3,2)
."

Narrative:

Aooo.

Happy birthday to Stephen King.

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Moonshine II

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , — m759 @ 10:31 AM

(Continued from yesterday)

The foreword by Wolf Barth in the 1990 Cambridge U. Press
reissue of Hudson's 1905 classic Kummer's Quartic Surface
covers some of the material in yesterday's post Moonshine.

The distinction that Barth described in 1990 was also described, and illustrated,
in my 1986 note "Picturing the smallest projective 3-space."  The affine 4-space
over the the finite Galois field GF(2) that Barth describes was earlier described—
within a 4×4 array like that pictured by Hudson in 1905— in a 1979 American
Mathematical Society abstract, "Symmetry invariance in a diamond ring."

"The distinction between Rosenhain and Goepel tetrads
is nothing but the distinction between isotropic and
non-isotropic planes in this affine space over the finite field."

The 1990 paragraph of Barth quoted above may be viewed as a summary
of these facts, and also of my March 17, 2013, note "Rosenhain and Göpel
Tetrads in PG(3,2)
."

Friday, March 2, 2007

Friday March 2, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:00 AM
Today’s birthdays:

Jennifer Jones,
film star and arts patron;

Tom Wolfe, author of
The Painted Word.

“Hunt for the best.”
Norton Simon 

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/angel_angel_down_we_go2A.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Cover detail,
soundtrack recording
of the Jennifer Jones film
“Angel, Angel, Down We Go”

The girl’s left eye in the above
portrait illustrates a remark
  in yesterday’s New York Times
on a figure in a painting:

“His head recedes into shadow, so you barely see his face. But a tiny fleck of white in his eye, a light that kindles his reawakening, brings him to life. It’s what Roland Barthes, the French critic, liked to call a punctum, the spot, marking time, that burns an image into memory.”

 (This remark, by Michael Kimmelman,
comes with a headline–

Lights! Darks! Action! Cut!  
Maestro of Mise-en-Scène
  

— that seems to have been inspired
by Tom Wolfe’s prose style.)

For further details, see
Barthes’s Punctum,
by Michael Fried.

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