Log24

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Frame

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:12 PM

Suggested by remarks in last night's link to posts tagged Swimmer —

"A professor is all-powerful, Gareth liked to tell his daughter,
he puts ‘a veritable frame around life,’ and ‘organizes the
unorganizable. Nimbly partitions it into modern and postmodern,
renaissance, baroque, primitivism, imperialism and so on. . . .'"

— From a review by Liesl Schillinger in the Aug. 13, 2006,
    New York Times  of a new novel by Marisha Pessl:
    Special Topics in Calamity Physics.

"A veritable frame" —

"Nimbly partitions" —

See also partitioning  in posts tagged  Crimson Abyss.

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Pip

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:01 PM

The title is from a poem in The New Yorker  last December —

. . . pip trapped inside, god’s
knucklebone . . . .

The conclusion of yesterday's Google Image Search for Göpel Inscape

See also "Pray to Apollo" in this journal.

A Cinematographer Departs

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:04 AM

In memory of cinematographer Michael Ballhaus, who reportedly
died at 81 in Berlin on Tuesday evening, April 11, the first full day 
of Passover, 2017.

From a New York Times  description of his work —

"The sinuous shot, which shows people parting  
like the Red Sea. . . ." — Margalit Fox tonight

From Log24 on the reported date of Ballhaus's death:

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Partitioning the Crimson Abyss

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 6:00 PM

For the title, see Crimson + Abyss in this journal.

"Ready when you are, C. B."

Hexagram 63, "After Completion"

Friday, April 7, 2017

Personal Identity

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:40 PM

From "The Most Notorious Section Phrases," by Sophie G. Garrett
in The Harvard Crimson  on April 5, 2017 —

This passage reminds me of (insert impressive philosophy
that was not in the reading).

This student is just being a show off. We get that they are smart
and well read. Congrats, but please don’t make the rest of the us
look bad in comparison. It should be enough to do the assigned
reading without making connections to Hume’s theory of the self.

Hume on personal identity (the "self")

For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe any thing but the perception. When my perceptions are removed for any time, as by sound sleep, so long am I insensible of myself, and may truly be said not to exist. And were all my perceptions removed by death, and could I neither think, nor feel, nor see, nor love, nor hate, after the dissolution of my body, I should be entirely annihilated, nor do I conceive what is further requisite to make me a perfect nonentity.
. . . .

I may venture to affirm of the rest of mankind, that they are nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions, which succeed each other with an inconceivable rapidity, and are in a perpetual flux and movement. Our eyes cannot turn in their sockets without varying our perceptions. Our thought is still more variable than our sight; and all our other senses and faculties contribute to this change: nor is there any single power of the soul, which remains unalterably the same, perhaps for one moment. The mind is a kind of theatre, where several perceptions successively make their appearance; pass, repass, glide away, and mingle in an infinite variety of postures and situations. There is properly no simplicity in it at one time, nor identity in different, whatever natural propension we may have to imagine that simplicity and identity. The comparison of the theatre must not mislead us. They are the successive perceptions only, that constitute the mind; nor have we the most distant notion of the place where these scenes are represented, or of the materials of which it is composed.

Related material —
Imago Dei  in this journal.

The Ring of the Diamond Theorem

Backstory —
The previous post
and The Crimson Abyss.

Thursday, March 30, 2017

2010 in 1984

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:29 PM

Click for a more realistic view of these years.

The Internet Abyss

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:09 PM

Suggested by the previous post, The Crimson Abyss

"Wer mit Ungeheuern kämpft, mag zusehn, dass er nicht dabei
zum Ungeheuer wird. Und wenn du lange in einen Abgrund blickst,
blickt der Abgrund auch in dich hinein."

"He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself
does not become a monster. And if you gaze long into an abyss,
the abyss also gazes into you."

—  Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil , Aphorism 146

From the Internet Abyss on Red October Day, October 25, 2010 —

An image reproduced in this  journal on that same day

Image-- 'Then a miracle occurs' cartoon

Cartoon by S.Harris

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

The Crimson Abyss

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:19 PM

"And as the characters in the meme twitch into the abyss
that is the sky, this meme will disappear into whatever
internet abyss swallowed MySpace."

—Staff writer Kamila Czachorowski, Harvard Crimson , March 29

1984

IMAGE- 'Affine Groups on Small Binary Spaces,' illustration

2010

Logo design for Stack Exchange Math by Jin Yang
 

Recent posts now tagged Crimson Abyss suggest
the above logo be viewed in light of a certain page 29

"… as if into a crimson abyss …." —

Update of 9 PM ET March 29, 2017:

Prospero's Children  was first published by HarperCollins,
London, in 1999. A statement by the publisher provides
an instance of the famous "much-needed gap." —

"This is English fantasy at its finest. Prospero’s Children 
steps into the gap that exists between The Lion, the Witch
and the Wardrobe
  and Clive Barker’s Weaveworld , and
is destined to become a modern classic."

Related imagery —

See also "Hexagram 64 in Context" (Log24, March 16, 2017).

Design Abyss

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 PM


http://www.log24.com/images/IChing/hexagram29.gif  
Hexagram 29,
The Abyss (Water)

This post was suggested by an August 6, 2010, post by the designer
(in summer or fall, 2010) of the Stack Exchange math logo (see
the previous Log24 post, Art Space Illustrated) —

http://www.8164.org/☵☲/  .

In that post, the designer quotes the Wilhelm/Baynes I Ching  to explain
his choice of Hexagram 63, Water Over Fire, as a personal icon —

"When water in a kettle hangs over fire, the two elements
stand in relation and thus generate energy (cf. the
production of steam). But the resulting tension demands
caution. If the water boils over, the fire is extinguished
and its energy is lost. If the heat is too great, the water
evaporates into the air. These elements here brought in
to relation and thus generating energy are by nature
hostile to each other. Only the most extreme caution
can prevent damage."

See also this  journal on Walpurgisnacht (April 30), 2010 —

http://www.log24.com/images/IChing/hexagram29.gif

Hexagram 29:
Water

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100430-Commentary.jpg

http://www.log24.com/images/IChing/hexagram30.gif

Hexagram 30:
Fire

"Hates California,
it's cold and it's damp.
"

Image--'The Fire,' by Katherine Neville

A thought from another German-speaking philosopher

"Die Philosophie ist ein Kampf gegen die Verhexung
unsres Verstandes durch die Mittel unserer Sprache."

See also The Crimson 's abyss in today's 4:35 AM post Art Space, Continued.

Art Space Illustrated

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:45 AM

Another view of the previous post's art space  —

IMAGE by Cullinane- 'Solomon's Cube' with 64 identical, but variously oriented, subcubes, and six partitions of these 64 subcubes

More generally, see Solomon's Cube in Log24.

See also a remark from Stack Exchange in yesterday's post Backstory,
and the Stack Exchange math logo below, which recalls the above 
cube arrangement from "Affine groups on small binary spaces" (1984).

IMAGE- Current math.stackexchange.com logo and a 1984 figure from 'Notes on Groups and Geometry, 1978-1986'

Art Space, Continued

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:35 AM

"And as the characters in the meme twitch into the abyss
that is the sky, this meme will disappear into whatever
internet abyss swallowed MySpace."

—Staff writer Kamila Czachorowski, Harvard Crimson  today

From Log24 posts tagged Art Space

From a recent paper on Kummer varieties,
arXiv:1208.1229v3 [math.AG] 12 Jun 2013,
The Universal Kummer Threefold,” by
Qingchun Ren, Steven V Sam, Gus Schrader, and
Bernd Sturmfels —

IMAGE- 'Consider the 6-dimensional vector space over the 2-element field,' from 'The Universal Kummer Threefold'

Two such considerations —

IMAGE- 'American Hustle' and Art Cube

IMAGE- Cube for study of I Ching group actions, with Jackie Chan and Nicole Kidman 

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