Log24

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Pip

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:01 PM

The title is from a poem in The New Yorker  last December —

. . . pip trapped inside, god’s
knucklebone . . . .

The conclusion of yesterday's Google Image Search for Göpel Inscape

See also "Pray to Apollo" in this journal.

Friday, December 9, 2016

Snow Dance

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

See Ballet Blanc  in this journal.

For a darker perspective, click on the image below.

IMAGE- Detail of large 'Search for the Lost Tesseract' image with Amy Adams, Richard Zanuck, 'snowflake' structure, and white gloves

See also Cartier in The Hexagon of Opposition.

Happy birthday to Kirk Douglas.

Kirk Douglas in 'Diamonds'

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Master Class

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 4:00 AM

Wikipedia (links added)—

"Hubbard coined Dianetics  from the Greek stems dia ,
meaning through, and nous , meaning mind."

Log24 on August 30

"The snow kept falling on the world,
big white flakes like white gloves."

— Frederick Seidel, "House Master,"
poem in The New Yorker  of Sept. 3, 2012

Detail of Aug. 30 illustration, with added arrow—

IMAGE- Detail of large 'Search for the Lost Tesseract' image with Amy Adams, Richard Zanuck, 'snowflake' structure, and white gloves

  The part of the illustration at upper right is from a post of
  Friday, July 13th, 2012, on the death of producer Richard Zanuck.

  "Pay no attention to the shadow behind the curtain."

Thursday, August 30, 2012

The Cruelest Month

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 6:08 AM

Last night's 10 PM post linked to an April 7, 2012,
post that through a series of further links leads
to Columbia Film Theory .

For other film-related remarks, by a
Columbia alumnus,* see last night's post.

See also the 1.3 MB image from Aug. 16, the night 
of Elvis's Wrap Party. An excerpt from that image
stars Amy Adams—

Images, including the late Richard Zanuck

For Amy, from the current New Yorker

The Master

* N.O.C.D.

Saturday, July 14, 2012

Shadows

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:01 AM

A tribute to Richard D. Zanuck in the style of Tim Burton—

Part I

IMAGE- G. H. Hardy around 1900, strongly resembling Paul McCartney

Part II

IMAGE- Beatles lyric 'There's a shadow hanging over me'

Part III

IMAGE- Richard D. Zanuck interview on 'Dark Shadows' film of director Tim Burton

The above Zanuck interview on Dark Shadows
was published on Midsummer Eve, June 23, 2012.

Also from June 23, 2012

IMAGE- 'Double Cross' symbol by Rudolf Koch from Midsummer Eve, 2012

Related material— Russell on Hardy.

Friday, July 13, 2012

Through

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 5:48 PM

Oscar-winning producer
Richard Zanuck dies at 77

See also today's previous post,
Vanity Fair 's 1996 "Remains of the Dia,"
and english-for-students.com/dia.html.

Click to enlarge

Wednesday, December 14, 2005

Wednesday December 14, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 AM
From Here
to Eternity

For Loomis Dean

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051214-MorenoCover.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

See also
For Rita Moreno
on Her Birthday

(Dec. 11, 2005)

Los Angeles Times
Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2005

OBITUARIES

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LOOMIS DEAN
After many years at Life magazine,
he continued to find steady work
as a freelancer and as a still
photographer on film sets.
(Dean Family)

Loomis Dean, 88;
Life Magazine Photographer
Known for Pictures of
Celebrities and Royalty

By Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer

Loomis Dean, a Life magazine photographer who made memorable pictures of the royalty of both Europe and Hollywood, has died. He was 88.

Dean died Wednesday [December 7, 2005] at Sonoma Valley Hospital in Sonoma, Calif., of complications from a stroke, according to his son, Christopher.

In a photographic career spanning six decades, Dean's leading images included shirtless Hollywood mogul Darryl F. Zanuck trying a one-handed chin-up on a trapeze bar, the ocean liner Andrea Doria listing in the Atlantic and writer Ernest Hemingway in Spain the year before he committed suicide. One of his most memorable photographs for Life was of cosmopolitan British playwright and composer Noel Coward in the unlikely setting of the Nevada desert.

Dean shot 52 covers for Life, either as a freelance photographer or during his two stretches as a staffer with the magazine, 1947-61 and 1966-69. After leaving the magazine, Dean found steady freelance work in magazines and as a still photographer on film sets, including several of the early James Bond movies starring Sean Connery.

Born in Monticello, Fla., Dean was the son of a grocer and a schoolteacher.

When the Dean family's business failed during the Depression, they moved to Sarasota, Fla., where Dean's father worked as a curator and guide at the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art.

Dean studied engineering at the University of Florida but became fascinated with photography after watching a friend develop film in a darkroom. He went off to what is now the Rochester Institute of Technology, which was known for its photography school.

After earning his degree, Dean went to work for the Ringling circus as a junior press agent and, according to his son, cultivated a side job photographing Ringling's vast array of performers and workers.

He worked briefly as one of Parade magazine's first photographers but left after receiving an Army Air Forces commission during World War II. During the war, he worked in aerial reconnaissance in the Pacific and was along on a number of air raids over Japan.

His first assignment for Life in 1946 took him back to the circus: His photograph of clown Lou Jacobs with a giraffe looking over his shoulder made the magazine's cover and earned Dean a staff job.

In the era before television, Life magazine photographers had some of the most glamorous work in journalism. Life assigned him to cover Hollywood. In 1954, the magazine published one of his most memorable photos, the shot of Coward dressed for a night on the town in New York but standing alone in the stark Nevada desert.

Dean had the idea of asking Coward, who was then doing a summer engagement at the Desert Inn in Las Vegas, to pose in the desert to illustrate his song "Mad Dogs and Englishmen Go Out in the Midday Sun."

As Dean recalled in an interview with John Loengard for the book "Life Photographers: What They Saw," Coward wasn't about to partake of the midday sun. "Oh, dear boy, I don't get up until 4 o'clock in the afternoon," Dean recalled him saying.

But Dean pressed on anyway. As he related to Loengard, he rented a Cadillac limousine and filled the back seat with a tub loaded with liquor, tonic and ice cubes — and Coward.

The temperature that day reached 119 as Coward relaxed in his underwear during the drive to a spot about 15 miles from Las Vegas. According to Dean, Coward's dresser helped him into his tuxedo, resulting in the image of the elegant Coward with a cigarette holder in his mouth against his shadow on the dry lake bed.

"Splendid! Splendid! What an idea! If we only had a piano," Coward said of the shoot before hopping back in the car and stripping down to his underwear for the ride back to Las Vegas.

In 1956, Life assigned Dean to Paris. While sailing to Europe on the Ile de France, he was awakened with the news that the Andrea Doria had collided with another liner, the Stockholm.

The accident occurred close enough to Dean's liner that survivors were being brought aboard.

His photographs of the shaken voyagers and the sinking Andrea Doria were some of the first on the accident published in a U.S. magazine.

During his years in Europe, Dean photographed communist riots and fashion shows in Paris, royal weddings throughout Europe and noted authors including James Jones and William S. Burroughs.

He spent three weeks with Hemingway in Spain in 1960 for an assignment on bullfighting. In 1989, Dean published "Hemingway's Spain," about his experiences with the great writer.

In 1965, Dean won first prize in a Vatican photography contest for a picture of Pope Paul VI. The prize included an audience with the pope and $750. According to his son, it was Dean's favorite honor.

In addition to his son, he is survived by a daughter, Deborah, and two grandsons.

Instead of flowers, donations may be made to the American Child Photographer's Charity Guild (www.acpcg.com) or the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

Related material:
The Big Time

(Log 24, July 29, 2003):

A Story That Works

 
  • "There is the dark, eternally silent, unknown universe;
  • there are the friend-enemy minds shouting and whispering their tales and always seeking the three miracles —

    • that minds should really touch, or
    • that the silent universe should speak, tell minds a story, or (perhaps the same thing)
    • that there should be a story that works, that is all hard facts, all reality, with no illusions and no fantasy;
  • and lastly, there is lonely, story-telling, wonder-questing, mortal me."

    Fritz Leiber in "The Button Molder"

 

Sunday, December 22, 2002

Sunday December 22, 2002

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:59 PM

State of Morelos

“Heaven is a state, a sort of metaphysical state.”

— John O’Hara, Hope of Heaven, 1938

In memory of soldier-priest José Morelos, producer Darryl Zanuck (“Viva Zapata!”), and actress Helene Stanley (“Holiday in Mexico” and action model for “Cinderella“), each of whom died on a December 22, tonight’s midnight midi is “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes.”

See also

Heaven, Hell, and Hollywood and
 
Trifecta.

Thursday, September 5, 2002

Thursday September 5, 2002

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:06 PM

Trifecta

Born today: Arthur Koestler,
former Communist and writer on parapsychology

From To Ride Pegasus, by Anne McCaffrey, 1973: 

“Mary-Molly luv, it’s going to be accomplished in steps, this establishment of the Talented in the scheme of things. Not society, mind you, for we’re the original nonconformists…. and Society will never permit us to integrate.  That’s okay!”  He consigned Society to insignificance with a flick of his fingers.  “The Talented form their own society and that’s as it should be: birds of a feather.  No, not birds.  Winged horses!  Ha!  Yes, indeed. Pegasus… the poetic winged horse of flights of fancy.  A bloody good symbol for us.  You’d see a lot from the back of a winged horse…”

“Yes, an airplane has blind spots.  Where would you put a saddle?”  Molly had her practical side.

He laughed and hugged her.  Henry’s frequent demonstrations of affection were a source of great delight to Molly, whose own strength was in tactile contacts. 

“Don’t know.  Lord, how would you bridle a winged horse?”

“With the heart?”

“Indubitably!”  The notion pleased him.  “Yes, with the heart and the head because Pegasus is too strong a steed to control or subdue by any ordinary method.” 

Born today:  Darryl F. Zanuck,
producer of “Viva Zapata!”

Director Eliza Kazan consults with scriptwriter John Steinbeck about the production of “Viva Zapata!” in Cuernavaca, Mexico:

When John woke, I asked him, “Isn’t the Syndicate of Film Technicians and Workers here Communist-dominated?”

Elia Kazan on Darryl Zanuck’s insistence that Zapata’s white horse be emphasized:

Darryl made only one suggestion that he was insistent on. He’d stolen it, no doubt, from an old Warner western, but he offered it as if it were pristine stuff. “Zapata must have a white horse,” he said, “and after they shoot him, we should show the horse running free in the mountains — get the idea? A great fade-out.” We got the idea, all right. Darryl was innocent about the symbol in his suggestion, but so enthusiastic about the emotion of it that he practically foamed at the mouth. John’s face was without expression. Actually, while I thought it was corny, the idea worked out well in the end. 

Born today: comedian Bob Newhart

 

If Kazan hadn’t directed “Viva Zapata!”…

Zanuck would have ended up shouting,

“I said a WHITE horse!”

Thursday September 5, 2002

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:36 AM

Birthdate of film producer Darryl F. Zanuck

Among Zanuck’s films were “All about Eve” and “Viva Zapata!”

Bright Star

I do not have a photograph of Lucero Hernandez, the subject of my journal notes

Shining Forth and

Plato, Pegasus, and the Evening Star.

In keeping with Zanuck’s commandment that “The kid stays in the picture!” —

The photo at left, of a very young actress, captures some of Lucero’s beauty.

Center for Global Education,
Augsburg College
 

Semester-abroad Program in Mexico

“The program is based in Cuernavaca, a city known for its perennial springtime (70-80 degrees). Cuernavaca, the capital of the state of Morelos, is about 50 miles south of Mexico City. Both the city and the state are important in Mexican history: the palace of the conqueror Hernan Cortez borders the central plaza in Cuernavaca and Morelos is known as “the cradle of the Mexican revolution” of 1910 led by Emiliano Zapata, who was born in a small town near Cuernavaca. A city of more than one million, Cuernavaca is also known for its innovative grass-roots education programs, economic cooperatives, and base Christian communities inspired by liberation theology.” 

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