Log24

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Sequel

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:11 AM

"A sequel lies beyond." — Emily Dickinson —

Actual Being

For example:

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Sermon

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:00 AM

“Tell it slant.” — Emily Dickinson

IMAGE- James Garner, NY Times obits

Saturday, March 8, 2014

Women’s History Month

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 PM

For the Princeton Class of 1905 —

Joyce Carol Oates Meets Emily Dickinson.

Oates —

"It is an afternoon in autumn, near dusk.
The western sky is a spider’s web of translucent gold.
I am being brought by carriage—two horses—
muted thunder of their hooves—
along narrow country roads between hilly fields
touched with the sun’s slanted rays,
to the village of Princeton, New Jersey.
The urgent pace of the horses has a dreamlike air,
like the rocking motion of the carriage;
and whoever is driving the horses
his face I cannot see, only his back—
stiff, straight, in a tight-fitting dark coat."

Dickinson —

"Because I could not stop for Death—
He kindly stopped for me—
The Carriage held but just Ourselves—
And Immortality."

Saturday, October 8, 2011

Found in Translation

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:48 AM

For the morning of Yom Kippur

"Amanecer— ¿Tienes una Bandera para mí?"

Emily Dickinson

The link above leads to an anonymous photo taken on July 18, 2006.

See also a large image search (1.9 MB) from yesterday
and a Log24 post from July 18, 2006, Sacred Order.

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

A Flag for Sunrise

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:48 AM

Thomas N. Armstrong III, a former director of the Whitney Museum of American Art, died at 78 on Monday in Manhattan.

William Grimes in this morning's New York Times

"… Mr. Armstrong set about strengthening the museum’s permanent collection, buying Frank Stella’s 1959 black painting “Die Fahne Hoch!” for $75,000 in 1977…."

See also "Fahne Hoch" in this journal and the following from the date of Armstrong's death—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110622-SearchForInvariants110620Sm.jpg

"Sunrise — Hast thou a Flag for me?" — Emily Dickinson

Related material: Piracy Project and, from Flag Day,
"Dawn's Early Light" and "Expressionistic Depth."

Sunday, September 5, 2010

Sunday School

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:30 AM

An Exclamation for Jenny.

The "Jenny" here refers to both Tuesday's Log24 post Page Mark and to a post from Dec. 29, 2005

Wishmaster 3:
Beyond the
Gates of Hell
,

SciFi channel,
7 PM tonight

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051229-JennyOhara.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

This world is not conclusion;
a sequel stands beyond
.”
Emily Dickinson

Wednesday, July 2, 2008

Wednesday July 2, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:33 AM

Sacerdotal Jargon

Wallace Stevens, from
"Credences of Summer" in
Transport to Summer (1947):

"Three times the concentred
     self takes hold, three times
The thrice concentred self,
     having possessed
The object, grips it
     in savage scrutiny…."

In memory of the former
first lady of Brazil,
who died on June 24 —

Emily Dickinson:

Till Summer folds her miracle —
As Women — do — their Gown —
Or Priests — adjust the Symbols —
When Sacrament — is done —


Symbols of the
thrice concentred self:

Symbols of the Thrice Concentred Self

The circular symbol is from July 1.
The square symbol is from June 24,
the date of death for the former
first lady of Brazil.

Wallace Stevens quotes Paul Klee:

"'… what artist would not establish himself there where the organic center of all movement in time and space– which he calls the mind or heart of creation– determines every function.' Conceding that this sounds a bit like sacerdotal jargon, that is not too much to allow…."

— "The Relations between Poetry and Painting" in The Necessary Angel (Knopf, 1951)

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Tuesday July 1, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:33 AM
 
THE USUAL SUSPECT
 

Emily Dickinson and the Mighty Merchant

Click image to enlarge.

Related material:

The three Log24 entries from
the date of Macke's death

Saturday, June 28, 2008

Saturday June 28, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM
The God Factor

NY Lottery June 23, 2008: Mid-day 322, Evening 000


The following poem of Emily Dickinson is quoted here in memory of John Watson Foster Dulles, a scholar of Brazilian history who died at 95 on June 23.  He was the eldest son of Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, a nephew of Director of Central Intelligence Allen Dulles, brother of Roman Catholic Cardinal Avery Dulles, and a grandson of Presbyterian minister Allen Macy Dulles, author of The True Church.

I asked no other thing,   
No other was denied.   
I offered Being for it;   
The mighty merchant smiled.   
 
Brazil? He twirled a button,           
Without a glance my way:   
"But, madam, is there nothing else   
That we can show to-day?"


"He twirled a button…."

Plato's diamond figure from the 'Meno'

The above figure
of Plato
(see 3/22)
was suggested by
Lacan's diamond
Lacan's lozenge - said by some to symbolize Derrida's 'differance'
(losange or poinçon)
as a symbol —
according to Frida Saal
of Derrida's
différance
which is, in turn,
"that which enables and
results from Being itself"
—  according to
Professor John Lye

I prefer Plato and Dulles
to Lacan and Lye.
 

Thursday, May 8, 2008

Thursday May 8, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:48 PM
Synchronicity,
Part Deux

Footprints at Log24 on the afternoon of May 8, 2008, including two from France

From
“On the Holy Trinity,”
the entry in the 3:20 PM
French footprint:

“…while the scientist sees
everything that happens
in one point of space,
the poet feels
everything that happens
in one point of time…
all forming an
instantaneous and transparent
organism of events….”

Vladimir Nabokov

From
“Angel in the Details,”
 the entry in the 3:59 PM
French footprint:

“I dwell in Possibility –
A fairer House than Prose”

Emily Dickinson

These, along with this afternoon’s
earlier entry, suggest a review
of a third Log24 item, Windmills,
with an actress from France as…

Changing Woman:

“Kaleidoscope turning…

Juliette Binoche in 'Blue'  The 24 2x2 Cullinane Kaleidoscope animated images

Shifting pattern
within unalterable structure…”
— Roger Zelazny, Eye of Cat  

“When life itself seems lunatic,
who knows where madness lies?”

— For the source, see 
Joyce’s Nightmare Continues.

Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Wednesday May 23, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:15 AM
Angel in the Details

See the Dickinson poem quoted here on May 15 (the date, as it happens, of Dickinson’s death) in the entry “A Flag for Sunrise.”  See also Zen and Language Games and a discussion of a detail in a Robert Stone novel.

“I dwell in Possibility –
A fairer House than Prose”

Emily Dickinson

Tuesday, May 15, 2007

Tuesday May 15, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:55 AM
A Flag for Sunrise

The title of the Robert Stone
novel comes from Emily Dickinson:

A Wife -- at daybreak I shall be --
Sunrise -- Hast thou a Flag for me?
At Midnight, I am but a Maid,
How short it takes to make a Bride --
Then -- Midnight, I have passed from thee
Unto the East, and Victory --

Midnight -- Good Night! I hear them call,
The Angels bustle in the Hall --
Softly my Future climbs the Stair,
I fumble at my Childhood's prayer
So soon to be a Child no more --
Eternity, I'm coming -- Sire,
Savior -- I've seen the face -- before!

Tuesday, October 10, 2006

Tuesday October 10, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:00 PM
Mate in
Two Seconds

From Oct. 14 last year:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051014-Tick.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

From Oct. 13 last year
(Yom Kippur):

A Poem for Pinter
Oct. 13, 2005

The Guardian on Harold Pinter, winner of this year's Nobel Prize for Literature:

"Earlier this year, he announced his decision to retire from playwriting in favour of poetry,"

Michael Muskal in today's Los Angeles Times:

"Pinter, 75, is known for his sparse and thin style as well as his etched characters whose crystal patter cuts through the mood like diamond drill bits."

Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise (See Jan. 25):

"'That old Jew gave me this here.'  Egan looked at the diamond….  'It's worth a whole lot of money– you can tell that just by looking– but it means something, I think.  It's got a meaning, like.'

'Let's see,' Egan said, 'what would it mean?'  He took hold of Pablo's hand cupping the stone and held his own hand under it.  '"The jewel is in the lotus," perhaps that's what it means.  The eternal in the temporal….'"

Notes on Modal Logic:

"Modal logic was originally developed to investigate logic under the modes of necessary and possible truth.  The words 'necessary' and 'possible' are called modal connectives, or modalities.  A modality is a word that when applied to a statement indicates when, where, how, or under what circumstances the statement may be true.  In terms of notation, it is common to use a box [] for the modality 'necessary' and a diamond <> for the modality 'possible.'"

A Poem for Pinter

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051013-Waka.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Commentary:

"Waka" also means Japanese poem or Maori canoe.  (For instance, this Japanese poem and this Maori canoe.)

For a meditation on "bang splat," see Sept. 25-29.

For the meaning of "tick tick," see Emily Dickinson on "degreeless noon."

"Hash," of course, signifies "checkmate."  (See previous three entries.)

For language more suited to
the year's most holy day, see
this year's Yom Kippur entry,
from October 2.

That was also the day of the
Amish school killings in
Pennsylvania and the day that
mathematician Paul Halmos died.

For more on the former, see
Death in Two Seconds.

For more on the latter, see
The Halmos Tombstone.

4x9 black monolith

Thursday, December 29, 2005

Thursday December 29, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:29 PM

Express

You've got to make him
Express himself
Hey, hey, hey, hey

Madonna  

Humboldt's Gift:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051229-Express162.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Related material on trains:

Davenport's Express
and End of Days.

Related material on 162:

Dogma Part II: Amores Perros,
The Matthias Defense,
The Still Point and the Wheel,
  Mark, and Confession.

Related material on
self-expression:

Wishmaster 3:
Beyond the
Gates of Hell
,

 

SciFi channel,
7 PM tonight

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051229-JennyOhara.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

"This world is not conclusion;
a sequel stands beyond
."
Emily Dickinson

Saturday, December 17, 2005

Saturday December 17, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 6:02 PM
Thirst for
the Absolute

This world is not conclusion;
  A sequel stands beyond,
Invisible, as music,
  But positive, as sound.
It beckons and it baffles;     
  Philosophies don't know,
And through a riddle, at the last,  
  Sagacity must go….

Emily Dickinson

From John Spencer's birthday,
December 20, in 2003:

Riddled:

The Absolutist Faith
of The New York Times

White and Geometric, but not Eternal.

(See previous entry.)

The title of this entry
  comes from within 
an entry of June 2, 2005,

The Barest Vocabulary
 at the Altar of Facts
.

Saturday, December 10, 2005

Saturday December 10, 2005

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 3:00 AM
For the birthday of Emily Dickinson:

"This world is not conclusion;
  A sequel stands beyond,
Invisible, as music,
  But positive, as sound.
It beckons and it baffles;         5
  Philosophies don’t know,
And through a riddle, at the last,
  Sagacity must go.
To guess it puzzles scholars;
  To gain it, men have shown         10
Contempt of generations,
  And crucifixion known."

Santa's Riddle

How do you add a single
point to a plane to
give it the shape
of a globe?

Hint:

"The lunatic,   
the lover, and
the poet…."  

Answer: See

Russell Crowe as Santa's Helper.

Sunday, November 13, 2005

Sunday November 13, 2005

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:40 AM
Structure

“Sunrise–
Hast thou a Flag for me?”
Emily Dickinson

From a
Beethoven’s Birthday entry:

  

Kaleidoscope turning…
Shifting pattern
within unalterable structure…
— Roger Zelazny, Eye of Cat

Related material:

Blue
(below),

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051113-Blue.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Bee Season
(below),

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051113-Scope1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Halloween Meditations,
Aquarius Jazz,
We Are the Key,
and
Jazz on St. Lucia’s Day.

“Y’know, I never imagined
the competition version involved
so many tricky permutations.”

— David Brin, Glory Season

Saturday, November 12, 2005

Saturday November 12, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 PM

State of Grace
On this date in 1929,
Grace Kelly was born.

Enough —
    the first Abode
On the familiar Road
Galloped in Dreams —

Emily Dickinson

 

“Nonbeing must in some sense be, otherwise what is it that there is not? This tangled doctrine might be nicknamed Plato’s beard; historically it has proved tough, frequently dulling the edge of Occam’s razor…. I have dwelt at length on the inconvenience of putting up with it. It is time to think about taking steps.”

— Willard Van Orman Quine, 1948, “On What There Is,” reprinted in From a Logical Point of View, Harvard University Press, 1980

“Item: Friar Guillaume’s razor
ne’er shaved the barber,
it is much too dull.”

— Robert A. Heinlein
  Glory Road

Related material:
Plato, Pegasus, and
the Evening Star

Thursday, October 13, 2005

Thursday October 13, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

A Poem for Pinter

The Guardian on Harold Pinter, winner of this year's Nobel Prize for Literature:

"Earlier this year, he announced his decision to retire from playwriting in favour of poetry,"

Michael Muskal in today's Los Angeles Times:

"Pinter, 75, is known for his sparse and thin style as well as his etched characters whose crystal patter cuts through the mood like diamond drill bits."

Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise  (See Jan. 25):

"'That old Jew gave me this here.'  Egan looked at the diamond….  'It's worth a whole lot of money– you can tell that just by looking– but it means something, I think.  It's got a meaning, like.'

'Let's see,' Egan said, 'what would it mean?'  He took hold of Pablo's hand cupping the stone and held his own hand under it.  '"The jewel is in the lotus," perhaps that's what it means.  The eternal in the temporal….'"

Notes on Modal Logic:

"Modal logic was originally developed to investigate logic under the modes of necessary  and possible  truth.  The words 'necessary' and 'possible' are called modal connectives , or modalities .  A modality is a word that when applied to a statement indicates when, where, how, or under what circumstances the statement may be true.  In terms of notation, it is common to use a box [] for the modality 'necessary' and a diamond <> for the modality 'possible.'"

A Poem for Pinter

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051013-Waka.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Commentary:

"Waka" also means Japanese poem or Maori canoe.

(For instance, this Japanese poem and this Maori canoe.)

For a meditation on "bang splat," see Sept. 25-29.

For the meaning of "tick tick," see Emily Dickinson on "degreeless noon."

"Hash," of course, signifies "checkmate."  (See previous three entries.)

Wednesday, October 5, 2005

Wednesday October 5, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:00 PM

New Page for Harvard’s President

From today’s Harvard Crimson:

“University President Lawrence H. Summers said yesterday that he will marry his longtime partner, Professor of English Elisa New.”

“I dwell in Possibility –
A fairer House than Prose”

Emily Dickinson, quoted in
    The Regenerate Lyric:
    Theology and Innovation
    in American Poetry, by
    Elisa New, page 162

Related material:
Log24 entries for Jan. 24 and 25, 2005.

Thursday, January 13, 2005

Thursday January 13, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

State of Grace

Utmost is relative —
Have not or Have
Adjacent sums
Enough — the first Abode
On the familiar Road
Galloped in Dreams —

Emily Dickinson

“Only through time time is conquered.”
— T. S. Eliot, Four Quartets

Monday, July 12, 2004

Monday July 12, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:29 PM

Sequel

This world is not conclusion;
  A sequel stands beyond,
Invisible, as music,
  But positive, as sound.
It beckons and it baffles;         5
  Philosophies don’t know,
And through a riddle, at the last,
  Sagacity must go.
To guess it puzzles scholars;
  To gain it, men have shown         10
Contempt of generations,
  And crucifixion known.

Monday, April 28, 2003

Monday April 28, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 12:07 AM

ART WARS:

Toward Eternity

April is Poetry Month, according to the Academy of American Poets.  It is also Mathematics Awareness Month, funded by the National Security Agency; this year's theme is "Mathematics and Art."

Some previous journal entries for this month seem to be summarized by Emily Dickinson's remarks:

"Because I could not stop for Death–
He kindly stopped for me–
The Carriage held but just Ourselves–
And Immortality.

………………………
Since then–'tis Centuries–and yet
Feels shorter than the Day
I first surmised the Horses' Heads
Were toward Eternity– "

 

Consider the following journal entries from April 7, 2003:
 

Math Awareness Month

April is Math Awareness Month.
This year's theme is "mathematics and art."


 

An Offer He Couldn't Refuse

Today's birthday:  Francis Ford Coppola is 64.

"There is a pleasantly discursive treatment
of Pontius Pilate's unanswered question
'What is truth?'."


H. S. M. Coxeter, 1987, introduction to Richard J. Trudeau's remarks on the "Story Theory" of truth as opposed to the "Diamond Theory" of truth in The Non-Euclidean Revolution

 

From a website titled simply Sinatra:

"Then came From Here to Eternity. Sinatra lobbied hard for the role, practically getting on his knees to secure the role of the street smart punk G.I. Maggio. He sensed this was a role that could revive his career, and his instincts were right. There are lots of stories about how Columbia Studio head Harry Cohn was convinced to give the role to Sinatra, the most famous of which is expanded upon in the horse's head sequence in The Godfather. Maybe no one will know the truth about that. The one truth we do know is that the feisty New Jersey actor won the Academy Award as Best Supporting Actor for his work in From Here to Eternity. It was no looking back from then on."

From a note on geometry of April 28, 1985:

 
The "horse's head" figure above is from a note I wrote on this date 18 years ago.  The following journal entry from April 4, 2003, gives some details:
 

The Eight

Today, the fourth day of the fourth month, plays an important part in Katherine Neville's The Eight.  Let us honor this work, perhaps the greatest bad novel of the twentieth century, by reflecting on some properties of the number eight.  Consider eight rectangular cells arranged in an array of four rows and two columns.  Let us label these cells with coordinates, then apply a permutation.

 


 Decimal 
labeling

 
Binary
labeling


Algebraic
labeling


Permutation
labeling

 

The resulting set of arrows that indicate the movement of cells in a permutation (known as a Singer 7-cycle) outlines rather neatly, in view of the chess theme of The Eight, a knight.  This makes as much sense as anything in Neville's fiction, and has the merit of being based on fact.  It also, albeit rather crudely, illustrates the "Mathematics and Art" theme of this year's Mathematics Awareness Month.

The visual appearance of the "knight" permutation is less important than the fact that it leads to a construction (due to R. T. Curtis) of the Mathieu group M24 (via the Curtis Miracle Octad Generator), which in turn leads logically to the Monster group and to related "moonshine" investigations in the theory of modular functions.   See also "Pieces of Eight," by Robert L. Griess.

Monday, April 21, 2003

Monday April 21, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:23 PM

Riddle
 
This world is not conclusion;
  A sequel stands beyond,
Invisible, as music,
  But positive, as sound.
It beckons and it baffles;         
  Philosophies don’t know,
And through a riddle, at the last,
  Sagacity must go.

Emily Dickinson

From an obituary of a biographer of Emily Dickinson, Richard B. Sewall, who died on Wednesday, April 16, 2003:

"Descended from a line of Congregational ministers dating back to the Salem of the witch trial era, Mr. Sewall was known for infusing his lectures with an almost religious fervor."

Riddle

What is the hardest thing to keep?

For one answer, see my entry of April 16, 2003.   For commentary on that answer, see the description of a poetry party that took place last April at Sleepy Hollow, New York.

See, too, the story that contains the following passages:

"As to the books and furniture of the schoolhouse, they belonged to the community, excepting Cotton Mather's History of Witchcraft, a New England Almanac, and book of dreams and fortune-telling….

The schoolhouse being deserted soon fell to decay, and was reported to be haunted by the ghost of the unfortunate pedagogue, and the plough-boy, loitering homeward of a still summer evening, has often fancied his voice at a distance, chanting a melancholy psalm tune among the tranquil solitudes of Sleepy Hollow."

Washington Irving

Update of 11:55 PM April 21, 2003,

in memory of
Nina Simone:

See also the last paragraph of this news story,
this website, and this essay,
or see all three combined.

From the entry of midnight, October 25-26, 2002:

Make my bed and light the light,
I'll arrive late tonight,
Blackbird, Bye-bye.

Nina Simone

For more on the eight-point star of Venus,
see "Bright Star," my note of October 23, 2002.

Saturday, April 12, 2003

Saturday April 12, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:23 PM

2:23 PM
Sequel
to the previous two entries

“This world is not conclusion;
A sequel stands beyond….”
— Emily Dickinson

Today’s birthday: dancer/actress Ann Miller.

“In 1937, she was discovered by Lucille Ball….”

Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz,
and Ann Miller, cast photo
from Too Many Girls (1940)

“Just goes to show star quality shines through….”
— Website on Too Many Girls 

“It’ll shine when it shines.”
— Folk saying, epigraph to The Shining

“Shine on, you crazy diamond.”
Pink Floyd

“Well we all shine on…”
— John Lennon, “Instant Karma

Wednesday, December 11, 2002

Wednesday December 11, 2002

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:08 PM

Sequel

ART WARS
Stan Rice,
Poet and Painter,
Is Dead at 60…

New York Times  
Wed Dec 11
06:27:00 EST 2002

“This world is not conclusion;
A sequel stands beyond….”

Emily Dickinson (See yesterday’s notes.)

And the hair of my flesh stood up (Job 4:15).
The emotional quality of the moment is
The religious experience of the atheist.
This is Day Three.
Ezra Pound makes me sit
Under the gold painted equestrian statue
At Central Park South and 5th.

— Stan Rice, “Doing Being” (See yesterday’s notes.)

Stan Rice died on Monday.
Today is Wednesday. 
This is Day Three

15  Then a spirit passed before my face;

        
the hair of my flesh stood up:
16  it stood still,

        
but I could not discern the form thereof:
an image was before mine eyes,
there was silence, and I heard a voice, saying,
17  Shall mortal man be more just than God?

        
Shall a man be more pure than his Maker?

Tuesday, December 10, 2002

Tuesday December 10, 2002

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:00 PM

Great Dream of Heaven

The title is that of Sam Shepard’s new book of short stories.  It is relevant to several of my recent journal entries.

This author’s own title also seems relevant.  Here is an excerpt from a web page on The Church of the Good Shepherd:

“This is the oldest church in Beverly Hills, and over the years, this small house of worship has been the local parish church for most of the Catholic movie stars who live in Beverly Hills…. It has seen numerous celebrity weddings and funerals. Although the church’s interior is modest (it seats just 600), and its decor surprisingly simple, the Church of the Good Shepherd has been featured in several Hollywood films: most notably, it was the location for the funeral scene in the 1954 version of ‘A Star is Born.'”

Today’s Birthday: Emily Dickinson

Complete Poems, 1924 

Part Four: Time and Eternity

LXXXIII

This world is not conclusion;
A sequel stands beyond….

 

Born Yesterday: Kirk Douglas 

From Douglas’s Climbing the Mountain: My Search for Meaning (Simon & Schuster, 1997) —

“Selling artwork, devoting time to charitable causes, writing novels, are all worthwhile means of occupying your time when good scripts aren’t coming your way.  But then, in the spring of 1993, one did.

It was called Wrestling Ernest Hemingway, a story of a growing friendship betwen two old men dealing with the twilight of their lives…. It was brilliant….

I called my agent… “So make the deal.”

A long pause.  “But the director wants to meet you.” ….

…. My agent called the next day. “She really likes you, Kirk… but… ah,” he started to stutter.

“What?”

“She wants Richard Harris.”

In the film of
Wrestling Ernest Hemingway 
as finally made,
Richard Harris dies on
Hemingway’s birthday.

Dead on October 25, 2002,
Picasso’s Birthday:

Actor Richard Harris  

A journal entry of October 25, 2002:

Wrestling Pablo Picasso

Aster on a
Greek Vase

Picasso by Karsh

Wrestling Ernest
Hemingway

The old men know when an old man dies.
— Ogden Nash

A description of the title story
in Sam Shepard’s Great Dream of Heaven:

“Two old men who share a house are as close as a married couple until a competition to wake up first in the morning and a mutual fascination with a Denny’s waitress drive them apart.”

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