Log24

Monday, February 6, 2017

Impetus

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:10 PM

Some notes related to recent posts

"Rilke's insistent quest for a purity associated with primitive origins
took a Russian turning, but could also be seen as an extension of
traditions developed in Europe in the modern era. When Balzac
takes a metaphysical look at modern life, he exclaims: 'There is a
primitive principle! . . . .' "

— The late Dore Ashton,
     "Art Critic Who Embraced and Inhabited Modernism"

Sixteenth-century alchemist in a novel by Balzac —

"If we eliminate God from this world, sire,
what remains? Man! Let us examine our domain.
The material world is made up of elements;
thos elements are resolved into a single one
which is endowed with motion.
The number THREE is the formula of creation:
matter, motion, product!" *
. . . .

"There is a primitive principle!
Let us grasp it at the point where it acts upon itself,
where it is a unit, where it is really a principle,
not a creature, a cause, not an effect —
we shall see it by itself, formless, ready to assume
all the forms which we see it assume in life.  
When we are face to face with this atom, 
when we have surprised motion at its
starting-point, we shall know its laws . . . ."

* "… la Matière, le Mouvement, le Produit!"

Twenty-first century writer on physics —

"Besides the concept of Newtonian force,
the concept of momentum, as defined by
the multiplication of mass m and velocity v,
i.e., mv, is also one of the key concepts in
Newtonian mechanics. Historically, the
concept of momentum can be regarded as
an outgrowth of the impetus concept of the
Middle Ages. But momentum is in fact quite
different from impetus which has no
quantitative definition. In comparison,
momentum is a quantitatively precise and
well-defined mechanical concept."

—  http://www.thecatalyst.org/physics/chapter-two.html.
      No author is named, but a "curriculum vitae" link at
      the bottom of the webpage leads to Kai X. Miao.

"C’était la création elle-même,
qui se servait de la forme de Balzac
pour faire son apparition . . . ."

Auguste Rodin , by Rainer Maria Rilke,
translated from the German by Catherine Caron,
Editions La Part Commune , 2001

See also a version in English, and Rilke's original German

 Aber langsam wuchs Rodin's Vision von Form zu Form. Und endlich sah er ihn. Er sah eine breite, ausschreitende Gestalt, die an des Mantels Fall alle ihre Schwere verlor. Auf den starken Nacken stemmte sich das Haar, und in das Haar zurückgelehnt lag ein Gesicht, schauend, im Rausche des Schauens, schäumend von Schaffen: das Gesicht eines Elementes. Das war Balzac in der Fruchtbarkeit seines Überflusses, der Gründer von Generationen, der Verschwender von Schicksalen. Das war der Mann, dessen Augen keiner Dinge bedurften; wäre die Welt leer gewesen: seine Blicke hätten sie eingerichtet. Das war der, der durch sagenhafte Silberminen reich werden wollte und glücklich durch eine Fremde. Das war das Schaffen selbst, das sich der Form Balzac's bediente, um zu erscheinen; des Schaffens Überhebung, Hochmut, Taumel und Trunkenheit. Der Kopf, der zurückgeworfen war, lebte auf dem Gipfel dieser Gestalt wie jene Kugeln, die auf den Strahlen von Fontänen tanzen. Alle Schwere war leicht geworden, stieg und fiel.

 So hatte Rodin in einem Augenblick ungeheuerer Zusammenfassung und tragischer Übertreibung seinen Balzac gesehen, und so machte er ihn. Die Vision verging nicht; sie verwandelte sich. . . . .

Related material:  Momentum  in this journal.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Primitive Principle

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:20 PM

"Rilke's insistent quest for a purity associated with primitive origins
took a Russian turning, but could also be seen as an extension of
traditions developed in Europe in the modern era. When Balzac
takes a metaphysical look at modern life, he exclaims: 'There is a
primitive principle! . . . .' "

— The late Dore Ashton,
     "Art Critic Who Embraced and Inhabited Modernism"

Putting aside the wild inaccuracy of Ashton's remarks,
the words "modernism" and "turning" suggest a review of

Saturday, February 4, 2017

The Rothko Conundrum

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 8:48 PM


Photo:  J. Griffis Smith

By Molly Glentzer, Houston Chronicle , February 3, 2016 

"At night, over Rothko Chapel's reflecting pond, 'Broken Obelisk' 
looks particularly dramatic.

The great American sculptor Barnett Newman once said his
monumental sculpture 'Broken Obelisk' was intended to transform
ideas about life and tragedy into a glimpse of the 'sublime.' "

. . . 

See as well Rothko
in this journal.

Houston Problem

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 3:33 PM

"A noted Rice University professor died Friday morning
when a Metro light rail train hit her near Hermann Park.

Marjorie Corcoran was bicycling toward the campus
about 8:30 a.m. when she was struck on the southbound
tracks at 6300 Fannin near Sunset, according to Metro officials."

The Houston Chronicle  yesterday

Houston is on Central Standard Time; 8:30 a.m. there
is 9:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (the time used here).

Log24 at that time yesterday

Corcoran's Rice University page
has some brief remarks 
on fundamental symmetries.

Character in a novel by Balzac

" la Matière, le Mouvement, le Produit!"

♫ Are You Going to Vanity Fair?

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:00 PM
"In those days, the occult sciences were 
cultivated with ardor well calculated to surprise the 
incredulous minds of our own sovereignly analytical 
age; perhaps they may detect in this historical 
sketch the germ of the positive sciences, widely 
studied in the nineteenth century, but without the 
poetic grandeur which was ascribed to them by the 
audacious investigators of the sixteenth century; 
who, instead of devoting their energy to industry, 
magnified art and made thought fruitful. The 
patronage universally accorded to art by the sov- 
ereigns of that time was justified, too, by the mar- 
vellous creations of inventors who started in quest 
of the philosopher's stone and reached amazing re- 
sults." — Balzac, Catherine de' Medici 

Honoré de Balzac, Sur Catherine de Médicis :

— Hé! bien, sire, en ôtant Dieu de ce monde, que reste-t-il?
L’homme! Examinons alors notre domaine?
Le monde matériel est composé d’éléments, ces éléments
ont eux-mêmes des principes. Ces principes se résolvent 
en un seul qui est doué de mouvement. Le nombre TROIS est
la formule de la création: la Matière, le Mouvement, le Produit!

— La preuve? Halte-là, s’écria le roi.

Illustration by Frederick Alfred Rhead of Vanity Fair,
page 96 in the John Bunyan classic Pilgrim's Progress 
(New York, The Century Co., 1912)

Friday, February 3, 2017

A Fable of Art Criticism

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:42 PM

Part I —

Part II —

Part III —

"Let us examine our domain." — Character in a Balzac novel

Ashton reportedly died on Monday, Jan. 30, 2017.
See some more-scholarly remarks by Ernst Cassirer
on "the domain of perception" quoted here on that date.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Hollywood Easter Egg

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 9:33 PM

From yesterday's post Hollywood Arrival

Yesterday's events at 6407 Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood,
together with the logic of number and time from recent
posts based on a Heinlein short story, suggest that the
character played by Adams is a sort of 'fifth element'
needed to save the world. 

In other words, the strange logic of recent posts ties the
California lottery number  6407 to the date  April 12, 2015, 
and a check of that date in this journal yields posts tagged
Orthodox Easter 2015 that relate to the 'fifth element.' "

A related image from Arrival  (at 1:37:18) —

A related passage of scientific prose —

"Paramount discoveries are still being made…."

Or at least distributed.

Putting the Y in Vanity

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Amy Adams on the cover of the 
Vanity Fair  Hollywood issue, 2017

Line spoken to Adams's
character in Arrival

You approach language
like a mathematician.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Hollywood Arrival

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

In the new film Arrival , Amy Adams plays a linguist
who must interpret the language used by aliens whose
spaceships hover at 12 points around the globe.

Yesterday's events at 6407 Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood,
together with the logic of number and time from recent
posts based on a Heinlein short story, suggest that the
character played by Adams is a sort of "fifth element"
needed to save the world. 

In other words, the strange logic of recent posts ties the
California lottery number  6407 to the date  April 12, 2015, 
and a check of that date in this journal yields posts tagged
Orthodox Easter 2015 that relate to the "fifth element."

Midrash by Ted Chiang from the story on which Arrival  was based  —

After the breakthrough with Fermat's Principle, discussions of scientific concepts became more fruitful. It wasn't as if all of heptapod physics was suddenly rendered transparent, but progress was suddenly steady. According to Gary, the heptapods' formulation of physics was indeed topsy-turvy relative to ours. Physical attributes that humans defined using integral calculus were seen as fundamental by the heptapods. As an example, Gary described an attribute that, in physics jargon, bore the deceptively simple name “action,” which represented “the difference between kinetic and potential energy, integrated over time,” whatever that meant. Calculus for us; elementary to them.

Conversely, to define attributes that humans thought of as fundamental, like velocity, the heptapods employed mathematics that were, Gary assured me, “highly weird.” The physicists were ultimately able to prove the equivalence of heptapod mathematics and human mathematics; even though their approaches were almost the reverse of one another, both were systems of describing the same physical universe.

Monday, January 30, 2017

The SAG Dagger

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 7:20 PM

Related posts:  Those now tagged Obelisk.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Roman Road

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:18 PM

"All roads lead to Rome."

— Xi Jinping, President of the
People's Republic of China,
at Davos today

In memoriam  Harvard art historian
James S. Ackerman, who reportedly
died on New Year's Eve 2016 —

"Is this an obelisk* I see before me?" 
— Adapted from a play by William Shakespeare

* See the previous post and "The Cherished Gift."

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

ART WARS continued

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

See the signature link in last night's post for a representation of Madison Avenue.

For a representation by  Madison Avenue, see today's New York Times—

IMAGE- Butter-Cow Lady, NY Math Museum, and World-as-Rubik-Cube ad

"As a movement Pop Art came and went in a flash, but it was the kind of flash that left everything changed. The art public was now a different public— larger, to be sure, but less serious, less introspective, less willing or able to distinguish between achievement and its trashy simulacrum. Moreover, everything connected with the life of art— everything, anyway, that might have been expected to offer some resistance to this wholesale vulgarization and demoralization— was now cheapened and corrupted. The museums began their rapid descent into show biz and the retail trade. Their exhibitions were now mounted like Broadway shows, complete with set designers and lighting consultants, and their directors pressed into service as hucksters, promoting their wares in radio and television spots and selling their facilities for cocktail parties and other entertainments, while their so-called education programs likewise degenerated into sundry forms of entertainment and promotion. The critics were co-opted, the art magazines commercialized, and the academy, which had once taken a certain pride in remaining aloof from the blandishments of the cultural marketplace, now proved eager to join the crowd— for there was no longer any standard in the name of which a sellout could be rejected. When the boundary separating art and fashion was breached, so was the dividing line between high art and popular culture, and upon all those institutions and professions which had been painstakingly created to preserve high art from the corruptions of popular culture. The effect was devastating. Some surrendered their standards with greater alacrity than others, but the drift was unmistakable and all in the same direction— and the momentum has only accelerated with the passage of time."

— Hilton Kramer, The Triumph of Modernism: The Art World, 1985-2005 , publ. by Ivan R. Dee on Oct. 26, 2006, pp. 146-147

Related material— Rubik in this journal, Exorcist in this journal, and For the Class of '11.

Friday, October 25, 2002

Friday October 25, 2002

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

ART WARS:
Picasso's Birthday

From an art quotes website:

Dore Ashton's Picasso on Art —

"We all know that Art is not truth.
Art is a lie that makes us realize truth,
at least the truth that is given us
to understand." — Pablo Picasso

From "Xanadu" —

"You have to believe we are magic."
— Olivia Newton-John

The Muse
Picasso

 

Soul Kiss
Olivia
Newton-John

 

 

 

A is for Art
Cullinane

 
"A work of art has an author and yet,
when it is perfect, it has something
which is essentially anonymous about it."
Simone Weil, Gravity and Grace 

 

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