Log24

Monday, June 25, 2018

The Trials of Device

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:34 AM

"A blank underlies the trials of device."

Wallace Stevens

"Designing with just a blank piece of paper is very quiet."

Kate Cullinane

Related material —

An image posted at 12 AM ET December 25, 2014:

The image stands for the
phrase "five by five,"
meaning "loud and clear."

Other posts featuring the above 5×5 square with some added structure:

Monday, April 24, 2017

The Trials of Device

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 3:28 PM

"A blank underlies the trials of device"
— Wallace Stevens, "An Ordinary Evening in New Haven" (1950)

A possible meaning for the phrase "the trials of device" —

See also Log24 posts mentioning a particular device, the pentagram .

For instance —

Wittgenstein's pentagram and 4x4 'counting-pattern'

Related figures

Pentagon with pentagram    

Sunday, June 6, 2010

The Trials of Device

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Image-- 'The Trials of Device -- Excerpts from Two Poems by Wallace Stevens'
Enlarge
.

Sunday, June 28, 2020

The Mephisto Device

Filed under: General — m759 @ 3:39 PM

The previous post, and Wallace Stevens, suggest a search
in this journal for “The Trials of Device.” That search yields,
among other images, the following —

The Mephisto Waltz  author, Fred Mustard Stewart, reportedly died
on February 7, 2007.  A check of that date in this journal yields . . .

This is not John Belushi, whose cover of
Frankie Laine’s “Rawhide” was memorable,
but Laine himself.

Some Frankie Laine lyrics quoted here on Stewart’s death date:

Frankie Laine (left) and the Blues Brothers

“Times when I know you’ll be lonesome,
times when I know you’ll be sad
Don’t let temptation surround you,
don’t let the blues make you bad”

— “We’ll Be Together Again,”
Frankie Laine,
March 30, 1913 —
February 6, 2007

Mephisto  fans may prefer Sting’s version of the phrase
“we’ll be together.” See Complex Reflection,  April 20, 2012.

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Geometry Lesson

Filed under: G-Notes,General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 AM

From "The Trials of Device" (April 24, 2017) —

Wittgenstein's pentagram and 4x4 'counting-pattern'

Pentagon with pentagram    

See also Wittgenstein in a search for "Ein Kampf " in this journal.

Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Publish or …

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM
 

From The New York Times  online on July 29 —

" Ms. Appelbaum’s favorite authors, she said in an interview with The Internet Writing Journal in 1998, were too many to count, but they included George Eliot, Anthony Trollope, Anne Tyler and Julian Barnes.

'I love to see writers expand our range of understanding, experience, knowledge, even happiness,' she said in that interview. 'Publishing has always struck me as a way to change the world.' "

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page B6 of the New York edition with the headline: Judith Appelbaum, Guru On Publishing, Dies at 78.

See a review of the new Anne Tyler novel Clock Dance
in today's  online New York Times .

For a more abstract dance, see Ballet Blanc .

"A blank underlies the trials of device." — Wallace Stevens

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Lexicon

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

"A blank underlies the trials of device." — Wallace Stevens

IMAGE- The ninefold square .

Saturday, February 24, 2018

The Ugly Duck

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 7:11 PM

"What of the night
That lights and dims the stars?
Do you know, Hans Christian,
Now that you see the night?"

— The concluding lines of
"Sonatina to Hans Christian,"
by Wallace Stevens
(in Harmonium  (second edition, 1931))

From "Mathmagic Land" (May 22, 2015)

Donald Duck with Pythagorean pentagram on hand

Donald in Mathmagic Land

From "The Trials of Device" (April 24, 2017)

Wittgenstein's pentagram and 4x4 'counting-pattern'

Pentagon with pentagram    

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

A Tale Unfolded

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 2:00 AM

A sketch, adapted tonight from Girl Scouts of Palo Alto

From the April 14 noon post High Concept

From the April 14 3 AM post Hudson and Finite Geometry

IMAGE- Geometry of the Six-Set, Steven H. Cullinane, April 23, 2013

From the April 24 evening post The Trials of Device

Pentagon with pentagram    

Note that Hudson's 1905 "unfolding" of even and odd puts even on top of
the square array, but my own 2013 unfolding above puts even at its left.

Sunday, April 23, 2017

A Small Model Composition…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:29 PM

…  A Scottish Play  suggested by  …

  • A passage quoted here Friday night

    "The Hegel action is applied to understand creative processes
    in two classical compositions — Beethoven’s Hammerklavier
    Sonata op. 106, and Liszt’s Mephisto Walzer — but also to
    the creation of a small model composition."

— From the abstract of  "Hegel’s Conceptual 
Group Action on Creative Dynamics in Music
," by 
Guerino Mazzola and Maria Mannone

  • A news story from today about a death yesterday —

  • An informative weblog post from Shakespeare's Birthday
    (today's date, April 23) three years ago 

http://toomuchhorrorfiction.blogspot.com/
2014/04/go-waltzing-mephisto-with-me.html

Illustration —

Saturday, December 5, 2015

Adventism

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 PM

"A blank underlies the trials of device…."

Sabbath School

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:00 AM

"A blank underlies the trials of device…."

Wallace Stevens

Discuss.

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Requiem for a Herald

Filed under: General — m759 @ 8:48 PM

In memory of Peter Drummond-Murray, two readings:

The Beauty that Saves and The Trials of Device.

Drummond-Murray reportedly died at 84 on April 13,
Palm Sunday.  The Telegraph  describes him:

“A big, grim-faced man with a dour wit,
Drummond-Murray resembled some rugged
Jacobite from a novel by Sir Walter Scott.”

Or Sydney Greenstreet.

“The stuff that dreams are made of.” — The Maltese Falcon

Monday, June 7, 2010

Inspirational Combinatorics

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM

According to the Mathematical Association of America this morning, one purpose of the upcoming June/July issue of the Notices of the American Mathematical Society  is

"…to stress the inspirational role of combinatorics…."

Here is another contribution along those lines—

Eidetic Variation

from page 244 of
From Combinatorics to Philosophy: The Legacy of  G.-C. Rota,
hardcover, published by Springer on August 4, 2009

(Edited by Ernesto Damiani, Ottavio D'Antona, Vincenzo Marra, and Fabrizio Palombi)

"Rota's Philosophical Insights," by Massimo Mugnai—

"… In other words, 'objectivism' is the attitude [that tries] to render a particular aspect absolute and dominant over the others; it is a kind of narrow-mindedness attempting to reduce to only one the multiple layers which constitute what we call 'reality.' According to Rota, this narrow-mindedness limits in an essential way even of [sic ] the most basic facts of our cognitive activity, as, for example, the understanding of a simple declarative sentence: 'So objectivism is the error we [make when we] persist in believing that we can understand what a declarative sentence means without a possible thematization of this declarative sentence in one of [an] endless variety of possible contexts' (Rota, 1991*, p. 155). Rota here implicitly refers to what, amongst phenomenologists is known as eidetic variation, i.e. the change of perspective, imposed by experience or performed voluntarily, from which to look at things, facts or sentences of the world. A typical example, proposed by Heidegger, in Sein und Zeit  (1927) and repeated many times by Rota, is that of the hammer."

* Rota, G.-C. (1991), The End of Objectivity: The Legacy of Phenomenology. Lectures at MIT, Cambridge, MA, MIT Mathematics Department

The example of the hammer appears also on yesterday's online New York Times  front page—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100606-Touchstones.jpg

Related material:

From The Blackwell Dictionary of Western Philosophy

Eidetic variation — an alternative expression for eidetic reduction

Eidetic reduction

Husserl's term for an intuitive act toward an essence or universal, in contrast to an empirical intuition or perception. He also called this act an essential intuition, eidetic intuition, or eidetic variation. In Greek, eideo  means “to see” and what is seen is an eidos  (Platonic Form), that is, the common characteristic of a number of entities or regularities in experience. For Plato, eidos  means what is seen by the eye of the soul and is identical with essence. Husserl also called this act “ideation,” for ideo  is synonymous with eideo  and also means “to see” in Greek. Correspondingly, idea  is identical to eidos.

An example of eidos— Plato's diamond (from the Meno )—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10A/100607-PlatoDiamond.gif

For examples of variation of this eidos, see the diamond theorem.
See also Blockheads (8/22/08).

Related poetic remarks— The Trials of Device.

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