Log24

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Transylvania Revisited

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:10 PM

The previous post suggests . . .

Jim Holt reviewing Edward Rothstein's Emblems of Mind: The Inner Life of Music and Mathematics  in The New Yorker  of June 5, 1995:

"The fugues of Bach, the symphonies of Haydn, the sonatas of Mozart: these were explorations of ideal form, unprofaned by extramusical associations. Such 'absolute music,' as it came to be called, had sloughed off its motley cultural trappings. It had got in touch with its essence. Which is why, as Walter Pater famously put it, 'all art constantly aspires towards the condition of music.'

The only art that can rival music for sheer etheriality is mathematics. A century or so after the advent of absolute music, mathematics also succeeded in detaching itself from the world. The decisive event was the invention of strange, non-Euclidean geometries, which put paid to the notion that the mathematician was exclusively, or even primarily, concerned with the scientific universe. 'Pure' mathematics came to be seen by those who practiced it as a free invention of the imagination, gloriously indifferent to practical affairs– a quest for beauty as well as truth." [Links added.]

A line for James McAvoy —

"Pardon me boy, is this the Transylvania Station?"

Bolyai 'worlds out of nothing' quote

See as well Worlds Out of Nothing ,  by Jeremy Gray.

Monday, June 17, 2019

High Society

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:16 PM

From the date in the above Google search result —

 See as well Jeremy Gray in this  journal.

Saturday, March 16, 2019

Multifaceted Narrative

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:40 PM

"Here, modernism is defined as an autonomous body
of ideas, having little or no outward reference, placing
considerable emphasis on formal aspects of the work
and maintaining a complicated—indeed, anxious—
rather than a naïve relationship with the day-to-day
world, which is the de facto view of a coherent group
of people, such as a professional or discipline-based
group that has a high sense of the seriousness and
value of what it is trying to achieve. This brisk definition…."

Jeremy GrayPlato's Ghost: The Modernist
Transformation of Mathematics
 , Princeton, 2008 

"Even as the dominant modernist narrative was being written,
there were art historians who recognized that it was inaccurate.
The narrative was too focused on France . . . . Nor was it
correct to build the narrative so exclusively around formalism;
modernism was far messier, far more multifaceted than that."

— Jane Kallir, https://www.tabletmag.com/
jewish-arts-and-culture/visual-art-and-design/
269564/the-end-of-middle-class-art

quoted here on the above date — Sept. 11, 2018.
 

From some related Log24 posts

Saturday, September 2, 2017

A Touchstone

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:16 PM

From a paper by June Barrow-Green and Jeremy Gray on the history of geometry at Cambridge, 1863-1940

This post was suggested by the names* (if not the very abstruse
concepts ) in the Aug. 20, 2013, preprint "A Panoramic Overview
of Inter-universal Teichmuller Theory
," by S. Mochizuki.

* Specifically, Jacobi  and Kummer  (along with theta functions).
I do not know of any direct  connection between these names'
relevance to the writings of Mochizuki and their relevance
(via Hudson, 1905) to my own much more elementary studies of
the geometry of the 4×4 square.

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Gamers

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

A search for Gamers in this journal yields

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/061019-Tombstones.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

This is not unrelated to the title of a 2008 
book by Jeremy Gray:

Plato's Ghost:
The Modernist Transformation
of Mathematics
.

Saturday, March 11, 2017

Atque Vale

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:28 PM

Jeremy Irons and the Apple of Eden —

Jeremy Gray, Valediction —

See also this journal on Thursday, 11 September, 2014.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Nicht Spielerei

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:07 AM

(Continued)

A passage suggested by the 2006 Oxford University Press title
The Architecture of Modern Mathematics , edited by 
José Ferreirós and Jeremy Gray —

Jeremy GrayPlato's Ghost: The Modernist Transformation of Mathematics ,
Princeton, 2008 —

"Here, modernism is defined as an autonomous body of ideas,
having little or no outward reference, placing considerable emphasis
on formal aspects of the work and maintaining a complicated—
ndeed, anxious— rather than a naïve relationship with the day-to-day
world, which is the de facto view of a coherent group of people,
such as a professional or discipline-based group that has a high sense
of the seriousness and value of what it is trying to achieve.
This brisk definition…."

William Butler Yeats —

“Poets and Wits about him drew;
‘What then?’ sang Plato’s ghost.
   ‘What then?’

‘The work is done,’
   grown old he thought, 
‘According to my boyish plan;
Let the fools rage,
   I swerved in naught,
Something to perfection brought’;
But louder sang that ghost,
   ‘What then?’

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Finite Geometry and Physical Space (continued)

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 1:26 PM

On Monday, October 14, 2013, Jeremy Gray published
an article titled "Epistemology of Geometry" in the online
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Gray's article did not mention the role of finite  geometry
in such epistemology.

For that role, see Finite Geometry and Physical Space 
as a web page and as a Google image search.

See also my papers at Academia.edu.

Thursday, August 4, 2011

Midnight in Oslo

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:00 PM

For Norway's Niels Henrik Abel (1802-1829)
on his birthday, August Fifth

(6 PM Aug. 4, Eastern Time, is 12 AM Aug. 5 in Oslo.)

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110804-Pesic-PlatosDiamond.jpg

Plato's Diamond

The above version by Peter Pesic is from Chapter I of his book Abel's Proof , titled "The Scandal of the Irrational." Plato's diamond also occurs in a much later mathematical story that might be called "The Scandal of the Noncontinuous." The story—

Paradigms

"These passages suggest that the Form is a character or set of characters common to a number of things, i.e. the feature in reality which corresponds to a general word. But Plato also uses language which suggests not only that the forms exist separately (χωριστά ) from all the particulars, but also that each form is a peculiarly accurate or good particular of its own kind, i.e. the standard particular of the kind in question or the model (παράδειγμα ) [i.e. paradigm ] to which other particulars approximate….

… Both in the Republic  and in the Sophist  there is a strong suggestion that correct thinking is following out the connexions between Forms. The model is mathematical thinking, e.g. the proof given in the Meno  that the square on the diagonal is double the original square in area."

– William and Martha Kneale, The Development of Logic , Oxford University Press paperback, 1985

Plato's paradigm in the Meno

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110217-MenoFigure16bmp.bmp

Changed paradigm in the diamond theorem (2×2 case) —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110217-MenoFigureColored16bmp.bmp

Aspects of the paradigm change—

Monochrome figures to
   colored figures

Areas to
   transformations

Continuous transformations to
   non-continuous transformations

Euclidean geometry to
   finite geometry

Euclidean quantities to
   finite fields

The 24 patterns resulting from the paradigm change—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11B/110805-The24.jpg

Each pattern has some ordinary or color-interchange symmetry.

This is the 2×2 case of a more general result. The patterns become more interesting in the 4×4 case. For their relationship to finite geometry and finite fields, see the diamond theorem.

Related material: Plato's Diamond by Oslo artist Josefine Lyche.

Plato’s Ghost  evokes Yeats’s lament that any claim to worldly perfection inevitably is proven wrong by the philosopher’s ghost….”

— Princeton University Press on Plato’s Ghost: The Modernist Transformation of Mathematics  (by Jeremy Gray, September 2008)

"Remember me to her."

— Closing words of the Algis Budrys novel Rogue Moon .

Background— Some posts in this journal related to Abel or to random thoughts from his birthday.

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Plato’s Ghost

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:07 AM

Jeremy Gray, Plato's Ghost: The Modernist Transformation of Mathematics, Princeton, 2008–

"Here, modernism is defined as an autonomous body of ideas, having little or no outward reference, placing considerable emphasis on formal aspects of the work and maintaining a complicated— indeed, anxious— rather than a naïve relationship with the day-to-day world, which is the de facto view of a coherent group of people, such as a professional or discipline-based group that has a high sense of the seriousness and value of what it is trying to achieve. This brisk definition…."

Brisk? Consider Caesar's "The die is cast," Gray in "Solomon's Cube," and yesterday's post

Group of 8 cube-face permutations generated by reflections in midplanes parallel to faces

This is the group of "8 rigid motions
generated by reflections in midplanes"
of Solomon's Cube.

Related material:

"… the action of G168 in its alternative guise as SL(3; Z/2Z) is also now apparent. This version of G168 was presented by Weber in [1896, p. 539],* where he attributed it to Kronecker."

Jeremy Gray, "From the History of a Simple Group," in The Eightfold Way, MSRI Publications, 1998

Here MSRI, an acronym for Mathematical Sciences Research Institute, is pronounced "Misery." See Stephen King, K.C. Cole, and Heinrich Weber.

*H. Weber, Lehrbuch der Algebra, Vieweg, Braunschweig, 1896. Reprinted by Chelsea, New York, 1961.

Monday, September 14, 2009

Monday September 14, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 3:09 PM
Figure

Generating permutations for the Klein simple group of order 168 acting on the eightfold cube

The Sept. 8 entry on non-Euclidean* blocks ended with the phrase “Go figure.” This suggested a MAGMA calculation that demonstrates how Klein’s simple group of order 168 (cf. Jeremy Gray in The Eightfold Way) can be visualized as generated by reflections in a finite geometry.

* i.e., other than Euclidean. The phrase “non-Euclidean” is usually applied to only some of the geometries that are not Euclidean. The geometry illustrated by the blocks in question is not Euclidean, but is also, in the jargon used by most mathematicians, not “non-Euclidean.”

Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Wednesday April 8, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 8:00 PM
Where Entertainment
Is God

“For every kind of vampire,
  there is a kind of cross.”
  — Thomas Pynchon in     
    Gravity’s Rainbow   

“Since 1963, when Pynchon’s first novel, V., came out, the writer– widely considered America’s most important novelist since World War II– has become an almost mythical figure, a kind of cross between the Nutty Professor (Jerry Lewis’s) and Caine in Kung Fu.”

Nancy Jo Sales in the November 11, 1996, issue of New York Magazine

A Cross Between

(Click on images for their
  source in past entries.)


In a Nutshell:

Plato’s Ghost evokes Yeats’s lament that any claim to worldly perfection inevitably is proven wrong by the philosopher’s ghost….”

— Princeton University Press on Plato’s Ghost: The Modernist Transformation of Mathematics (by Jeremy Gray, September 2008)

“She’s a brick house…”
 — Plato’s Ghost according to   
Log24, April 2007 

“First of all, I’d like
to thank the Academy.”
Remark attributed to Plato

Jerry Lewis Wins an Oscar at Last-- TIME magazine



David Carradine displays a yellow book-- the Princeton I Ching.

Click on the Yellow Book.”

Monday, March 16, 2009

Monday March 16, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM
Plato’s Ghost

Plato’s Ghost evokes Yeats’s lament that any claim to worldly perfection inevitably is proven wrong by the philosopher’s ghost….”

— Princeton University Press on Plato’s Ghost: The Modernist Transformation of Mathematics (by Jeremy Gray, September 2008)

“She’s a brick house…”
 — Plato’s Ghost according to
     Log24, April 2007 

“First of all, I’d like
to thank the Academy.”
Remark attributed to Plato

Jerry Lewis Wins an Oscar at Last-- TIME magazine

Through a glass, darkly

Eddie Murphy and mirror image in remake of 'The Nutty Professor'

(Cf. the “I tell you a mystery”
link of March 11 in
Politics, Religion, Scarlett.”)

Friday, November 3, 2006

Friday November 3, 2006

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 AM

First to Illuminate

From the History of a Simple Group” (pdf), by Jeremy Gray:

“The American mathematician A. B. Coble [1908; 1913]* seems to have been the first to illuminate the 27 lines and 28 bitangents with the elementary theory of geometries over finite fields.

The combinatorial aspects of all this are pleasant, but the mathematics is certainly not easy.”

* [Coble 1908] A. Coble, “A configuration in finite geometry isomorphic with that of the 27 lines on a cubic  surface,” Johns Hopkins University Circular 7:80-88 (1908), 736-744.

   [Coble 1913] A. Coble, “An application of finite geometry to the characteristic theory of the odd and even theta functions,” Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 14 (1913), 241-276.

Related material:

Geometry of the 4x4x4 Cube,

Christmas 2005.

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