Log24

Friday, November 24, 2017

Scholia

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:00 PM

From this evening's online New York Times : 

"Eric Salzman, a composer and music critic who
championed a new art form, music theater,
that was neither opera nor stage musical, died
on Nov. 12 at his home in Brooklyn. He was 84."

. . . .

"The first American Music Theater Festival 
took place in the summer of 1984.

Among that first festival’s featured works was 
'Strike Up the Band!,' Mr. Salzman’s 'reconstructed
and adapted' version of a satirical musical
with a score by George and Ira Gershwin
that had not been staged in 50 years. The director
of that production, Frank Corsaro, died 
the day before Mr. Salzman did."

Synchronology check :

"The day before" above was November 11, 2017.

Links from this  journal  on November 11

A Log24 search for Michael Sudduth and an 
October 28, 2017, Facebook post by Sudduth.

Detail of Sudduth's Nov. 11 Facebook home page

Click the above for an enlarged view of the Sudduth profile picture.

Related material :

Harold Schonberg, 1977 review of Corsaro production of Busoni's 'Dr. Faust'

Aooo.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Sleep Tale

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:01 AM

For the late Carolyn Cassady, once a wife of Neal Cassady
(Dean Moriarty of Jack Kerouac's classic novel On the Road ).
She reportedly died at 90 in England on Friday, September 20,
2013.

From a post in this journal on the night of September 20-21,
with waning Harvest Moon:

Click on "Aooo" for some related posts, tagged "Howl."

Saturday, September 21, 2013

Mathematics and Narrative (continued)

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:00 AM

Mathematics:

A review of posts from earlier this month —

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

Moonshine

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Unexpected connections between areas of mathematics
previously thought to be unrelated are sometimes referred
to as "moonshine."  An example—  the apparent connections
between parts of complex analysis and groups related to the
large Mathieu group M24. Some recent work on such apparent
connections, by Anne Taormina and Katrin Wendland, among
others (for instance, Miranda C.N. Cheng and John F.R. Duncan),
involves structures related to Kummer surfaces .
In a classic book, Kummer's Quartic Surface  (1905),
R.W.H.T. Hudson pictured a set of 140 structures, the 80
Rosenhain tetrads and the 60 Göpel tetrads, as 4-element
subsets of a 16-element 4×4 array.  It turns out that these
140 structures are the planes of the finite affine geometry
AG(4,2) of four dimensions over the two-element Galois field.
(See Diamond Theory in 1937.)

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Moonshine II

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags:  — m759 @ 10:31 AM

(Continued from yesterday)

The foreword by Wolf Barth in the 1990 Cambridge U. Press
reissue of Hudson's 1905 classic Kummer's Quartic Surface
covers some of the material in yesterday's post Moonshine.

The distinction that Barth described in 1990 was also described, and illustrated,
in my 1986 note "Picturing the smallest projective 3-space."  The affine 4-space
over the the finite Galois field GF(2) that Barth describes was earlier described—
within a 4×4 array like that pictured by Hudson in 1905— in a 1979 American
Mathematical Society abstract, "Symmetry invariance in a diamond ring."

"The distinction between Rosenhain and Goepel tetrads
is nothing but the distinction between isotropic and
non-isotropic planes in this affine space over the finite field."

The 1990 paragraph of Barth quoted above may be viewed as a summary
of these facts, and also of my March 17, 2013, note "Rosenhain and Göpel
Tetrads in PG(3,2)
."

Narrative:

Aooo.

Happy birthday to Stephen King.

Saturday, September 7, 2013

Howl

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

For Warren Zevon, who died ten years ago today —

Aooo!

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