Log24

Saturday, November 14, 2020

To Think That It Happened on Prescott Street

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:04 AM

Or:   Geometric Logic Continued

Part I: Mystic Twaddle

Part II:  Meanwhile, on that same date —

Part III: Back at Harvard — 

A link from the above post, infra —

“Some Harvard-related material — See Leary and 6 Prescott .”

Wednesday, August 26, 2020

Plan 9 from Prescott Street*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:22 AM

Plan 9 deals with the resurrection of the dead.” 

IMAGE- Bill Murray explains Ed Wood's 'Plan 9 from Outer Space'

* See the previous post‘s link to the phrase
“Turn on, tune in, drop dead.”

Saturday, May 16, 2020

Adventures on Prescott Street…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:03 PM

Continue.

For a member of a 1960-1961 Harvard Freshman Seminar
at 8 Prescott Street —

Dusenbury’s study of color  was published on June 9, 2015.

This  journal on that date —

Sunday, January 19, 2020

For 6 Prescott Street*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:01 PM

"Freshman Seminar Program Department Administrator Corinna S. Rohse
described the program’s courses, which allow students to study subjects
that vary from Sanskrit to the mathematical basis for chess, as
'jewel-like:  small and incredibly well-cut.' "

The Harvard Crimson , Dec. 10, 2008

For remarks related to Sanskrit, chessboard structure, and "jewel-like" 
mathematics, see A Prince of Darkness (Log24, March 28, 2006).

See also Walsh Functions in this journal and

Lecture notes on dyadic harmonic analysis
(Cuernavaca, 2000)

Dr. Maria Cristina Pereyra

Compare and contrast these remarks of Pereyra with the following
remarks, apparently by the same Corinna S. Rohse quoted above.

* Location of the Harvard Freshman Seminar program in the 2008
article above. The building at 6 Prescott was moved there from 
5 Divinity Avenue in 1978. When the seminar program was started
in the fall of 1959, it was located in a house at 8 Prescott St. (In 
1958-1959 this was a freshman dorm, the home of Ted Kaczynski.)

Tuesday, August 25, 2020

Gail Sheehy and the Source

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:45 PM

Sheehy reportedly died on Monday, August 24, 2020.

YouTube has the Vermont speech:

From this  journal on that date

From 'The Politics of Experience,' by R.D. Laing

Summary:  “Turn on, tune in, drop dead.

Monday, June 22, 2020

The Long Hello…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:51 AM

Continues.

“In July, 1960, having just received a doctorate from Harvard
and a research and training fellowship from the National Institute
of Mental Health, I drove, together with my wife, Sandylee,
from Cambridge, Massachusetts to Cuernavaca, Mexico.”

Michael Maccoby, June 26, 2014

This is the Michael Maccoby of . . .

First published, with a less lurid cover,  in 1958 by Arlington Books
of Cambridge, Mass.

What appears to be that 1958 edition, with the Maccoby introduction,
is available as a PDF —

http://paragoninspects.com/articles/pdfs/temp/operators_and_things.pdf .

Some Harvard-related material — See Leary and 6 Prescott .

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Very Stable Kool-Aid

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:16 PM

Two of the thumbnail previews
from yesterday's 1 AM  post

"Hum a few bars"

"For 6 Prescott Street"

Further down in the "6 Prescott St." post, the link 5 Divinity Avenue
leads to

A Letter from Timothy Leary, Ph.D., July 17, 1961

Harvard University
Department of Social Relations
Center for Research in Personality
Morton Prince House
5 Divinity Avenue
Cambridge 38, Massachusetts

July 17, 1961

Dr. Thomas S. Szasz
c/o Upstate Medical School
Irving Avenue
Syracuse 10, New York

Dear Dr. Szasz:

Your book arrived several days ago. I've spent eight hours on it and realize the task (and joy) of reading it has just begun.

The Myth of Mental Illness is the most important book in the history of psychiatry.

I know it is rash and premature to make this earlier judgment. I reserve the right later to revise and perhaps suggest it is the most important book published in the twentieth century.

It is great in so many ways–scholarship, clinical insight, political savvy, common sense, historical sweep, human concern– and most of all for its compassionate, shattering honesty.

. . . .

The small Morton Prince House in the above letter might, according to
the above-quoted remarks by Corinna S. Rohse, be called a "jewel box."
Harvard moved it in 1978 from Divinity Avenue to its current location at
6 Prescott Street.

Related "jewel box" material for those who
prefer narrative to mathematics —

"In The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test , Tom Wolfe writes about encountering 
'a young psychologist,' 'Clifton Fadiman’s nephew, it turned out,' in the
waiting room of the San Mateo County jail. Fadiman and his wife were
'happily stuffing three I-Ching coins into some interminable dense volume*
of Oriental mysticism' that they planned to give Ken Kesey, the Prankster-
in-Chief whom the FBI had just nabbed after eight months on the lam.
Wolfe had been granted an interview with Kesey, and they wanted him to
tell their friend about the hidden coins. During this difficult time, they
explained, Kesey needed oracular advice."

— Tim Doody in The Morning News  web 'zine on July 26, 2012**

Oracular advice related to yesterday evening's
"jewel box" post …

A 4-dimensional hypercube H (a tesseract ) has 24 square
2-dimensional faces
.  In its incarnation as a Galois  tesseract
(a 4×4 square array of points for which the appropriate transformations
are those of the affine 4-space over the finite (i.e., Galois) two-element
field GF(2)), the 24 faces transform into 140 4-point "facets." The Galois 
version of H has a group of 322,560 automorphisms. Therefore, by the
orbit-stabilizer theorem, each of the 140 facets of the Galois version has
a stabilizer group of  2,304 affine transformations.

Similar remarks apply to the I Ching  In its incarnation as  
a Galois hexaract , for which the symmetry group — the group of
affine transformations of the 6-dimensional affine space over GF(2) —
has not 322,560 elements, but rather 1,290,157,424,640.

* The volume Wolfe mentions was, according to Fadiman, the I Ching.

** See also this  journal on that date — July 26, 2012.

Monday, January 27, 2020

A Line for Rose the Hat

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 AM

"Hum a few bars, Steely Dan."

Related material — "For 6 Prescott Street" and "SAT."
_________________________________________________________________

Links' thumbnail previews —

"Hum a few bars"

"For 6 Prescott Street"

"SAT"

Friday, May 9, 2003

Friday May 9, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 6:30 PM

ART WARS

The Rhetoric of Power:
A meditation for Mental Health Month

From “Secondary Structures,” by Tom Moody, Sculpture Magazine, June 2000:

“By the early ’90s, the perception of Minimalism as a ‘pure’ art untouched by history lay in tatters. The coup de grâce against the movement came not from an artwork, however, but from a text. Shortly after the removal of Richard Serra’s Tilted Arc from New York City’s Federal Plaza, Harvard art historian Anna Chave published ‘Minimalism and the Rhetoric of Power’ (Arts Magazine, January 1990), a rousing attack on the boys’ club that stops just short of a full-blown ad hominem rant. Analyzing artworks (Walter de Maria’s aluminum swastika, Morris’s ‘carceral images,’ Flavin’s phallic ‘hot rods’), critical vocabulary (Morris’s use of ‘intimacy’ as a negative, Judd’s incantatory use of the word ‘powerful’), even titles (Frank Stella’s National Socialist-tinged Arbeit Macht Frei and Reichstag), Chave highlights the disturbing undercurrents of hypermasculinity and social control beneath Minimalism’s bland exterior.  Seeing it through the eyes of the ordinary viewer, she concludes that ‘what [most] disturbs [the public at large] about Minimalist art may be what disturbs them about their own lives and times, as the face it projects is society’s blankest, steeliest face; the impersonal face of technology, industry and commerce; the unyielding face of the father: a face that is usually far more attractively masked.’ ”

From Maureen Dowd’s New York Times column of June 9, 2002: 

“The shape of the government is not as important as the policy of the government. If he makes the policy aggressive and pre-emptive, the president can conduct the war on terror from the National Gallery of Art.”

From the New York Times
Friday, May 2, 2003:

The National Gallery of Art in Washington has just acquired Tony Smith’s first steel sculpture: “Die,” created in 1962 and fabricated in 1968.

“It’s a seminal icon of postwar American art,” said Earl A. Powell III, director of the National Gallery.

Die (Tony Smith)

Bishop Moore

From a New York Times obituary,
Friday, May 2, 2003:

Bishop Dies

by Ari L. Goldman

Paul Moore Jr., the retired Episcopal bishop of New York who for more than a decade was the most formidable liberal Christian voice in the city, died yesterday at home in Greenwich Village. He was 83….

Bishop Moore argued for his agenda in the most Christian of terms, refusing to cede Biblical language to the Christian right. Although he retired as bishop in 1989, he continued to speak out, taking to the pulpit of his former church as recently as March 24, even as illness overtook him, to protest the war in Iraq.

“It appears we have two types of religion here,” the bishop said, aiming his sharpest barbs at President Bush. “One is a solitary Texas politician who says, `I talk to Jesus, and I am right.’ The other involves millions of people of all faiths who disagree.”

He added: “I think it is terrifying. I believe it will lead to a terrible crack in the whole culture as we have come to know it.”….

[In reference to another question] Bishop Moore later acknowledged that his rhetoric was strong, but added, “In this city you have to speak strongly to be heard.”

Paul Moore’s early life does not immediately suggest an affinity for the kinds of social issues that he would later champion…. His grandfather was one of the founders of Bankers Trust. His father was a good friend of Senator Prescott Bush, whose son, George H. W. Bush, and grandson, George W. Bush, would become United States presidents.

Related material (update of May 12, 2003):

  1. Pilate, Truth, and Friday the Thirteenth
  2. The Diamond Theory of Truth
  3. Understanding

Question:

Which of the two theories of truth in reading (2) above is exemplified by Moore’s March 24 remarks?

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