Log24

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

A Flag for Sunrise

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:48 AM

Thomas N. Armstrong III, a former director of the Whitney Museum of American Art, died at 78 on Monday in Manhattan.

William Grimes in this morning's New York Times

"… Mr. Armstrong set about strengthening the museum’s permanent collection, buying Frank Stella’s 1959 black painting “Die Fahne Hoch!” for $75,000 in 1977…."

See also "Fahne Hoch" in this journal and the following from the date of Armstrong's death—

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110622-SearchForInvariants110620Sm.jpg

"Sunrise — Hast thou a Flag for me?" — Emily Dickinson

Related material: Piracy Project and, from Flag Day,
"Dawn's Early Light" and "Expressionistic Depth."

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Diamond Bits

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:21 PM

Or:  Putting the Pinter in Pinterest

From "A Poem for Pinter"

Log24 on Oct. 13, 2005

The Guardian on Harold Pinter, winner of this year's Nobel Prize for Literature:

"Earlier this year, he announced his decision to retire from playwriting in favour of poetry,"

Michael Muskal in today's Los Angeles Times:

"Pinter, 75, is known for his sparse and thin style as well as his etched characters whose crystal patter cuts through the mood like diamond drill bits."

Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise  (See Jan. 25):

"'That old Jew gave me this here.'  Egan looked at the diamond….  'It's worth a whole lot of money– you can tell that just by looking– but it means something, I think.  It's got a meaning, like.'

'Let's see,' Egan said, 'what would it mean?'  He took hold of Pablo's hand cupping the stone and held his own hand under it.  '"The jewel is in the lotus," perhaps that's what it means.  The eternal in the temporal….'"

See as well an image in a link target from today's noon post

Sunday, March 16, 2014

Old Jew

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:25 PM

See also Blockheads (esp. today’s 2 PM post) and
That old Jew gave me this here.”

IMAGE- 'A Flag for Sunrise,' by Robert Stone, p. 373

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Midnight in Paris

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:00 PM

Six PM EDT is midnight in Paris.

Así Que Pasen Cinco Años

Theater review from The Guardian

" 'Impossible' was how the Spanish playwright
Lorca described his own 1931 'legend of time
in three acts and five scenes,' which draws
strongly on the surrealist influences and experiments
of his close friends Salvador Dali and Luis Buñuel."

Related material—

This afternoon's previous post Murió Fuentes  and,
from this date five years ago…

A Flag for Sunrise and Jerry Falwell Dies.

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Harrowing (continued)

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Theology in 'A Flag for Sunrise'

There is an unwarranted leap here
from "suggests" to "knowledge."

See Under the Volcano  and "harrowing" in this journal.

Friday, April 29, 2011

Times Square Church

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:11 PM

"For Mr. Lumet, location mattered deeply."

April 9th online New York Times

"That old Jew gave me this here."

A Flag for Sunrise

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110428-ExhibitB.gif

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11A/110429-NYTobits1031PM-Thumb.jpg

Larger image (1.5 MB)

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

The Rising…

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Notes on Mathematics and Narrative, continued

"the Citizen Kane of horror films"
Sarah Lawless quoting other reviews
in Saga of the Wicker Man,
cited here on September 7

"Frivolous as a willow on a tombstone"
— Robert Stone on "our secret culture" in A Flag for Sunrise

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101006-WickerMan.jpg

"world's wildfire, leave but ash"
— Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J.,
quoted here on October 4

Happy birthday, Britt.

Sunday, May 30, 2010

Today’s Sermon

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:06 AM

Image- Google Book Search results for Robert Stone's 'A Flag for Sunrise' plus 'our secret culture'

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Ideas of Reference

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:31 AM

Thanks to David Lavery for the following–

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100313-Memorabilia.jpg

See also references in Log24 to "Hitler Plans Burning Man," as well as…

"Imagine a multidimensional spider's web…."
— Alan Watts in Wikipedia article on Indra's Net.

and

"the Burning Man Evolution of
 Spider Robinson's Cross-Time Saloon."

The paranoid schizophrenics among us might also enjoy what they may, if they like, view as a coded reference to today's date, 3/13–

Page 313 in Robert Stone's classic novel
A Flag for Sunrise  (Knopf hardcover, 1981).

Sunday, February 21, 2010

Reflections, continued

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 PM

"The eye you see him with is the same
eye with which he sees you."

– Father Egan on page 333
of Robert Stone's A Flag for Sunrise
(Knopf hardcover, 1981)

Part I– Bounded in a Nutshell

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100221-Neverwas2.jpg

Ian McKellen at a mental hospital's diamond-shaped window in "Neverwas"

Part II– The Royal Castle

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100221-Newverwas11.jpg

Ian McKellen at his royal castle's diamond-shaped window in "Neverwas"

Part III– King of Infinite Space

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100221-KingOfInfiniteSpace.jpg

H.S.M. Coxeter crowns himself "King of Infinite Space"

Related material:

See Coxeter in this journal.

Sunday, January 31, 2010

Unholy Scripture

Filed under: General — m759 @ 6:06 PM

From The New York Times

4TH NIGHT FREE

NY Times 1:43 PM Jan. 28, 2010-- News of Salinger's death, with ad-- 'Only in Atlantis: 4th night free'

From this journal —

Sunday, November 5, 2006

Twilight Kingdom

“What he cannot contemplate is the reproach of

    … that final meeting
In the twilight kingdom,

when at length he may meet the eyes….”

On “The Hollow Men”

” … unless
The eyes reappear
As the perpetual star
Multifoliate rose
Of death’s twilight kingdom”

Related readings from unholy scripture:
 

  The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/040604-Feeling.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

A.  The “long twilight struggle” speech of JFK

B.  “The Platters were singing ‘Each day I pray for evening just to be with you,’ and then it started to happen.  The pump turns on in ecstasy.  I closed my eyes, I held her with my eyes closed and went into her that way, that way you do, shaking all over, hearing the heel of my shoe drumming against the driver’s-side door in a spastic tattoo, thinking that I could do this even if I was dying, even if I was dying, even if I was dying; thinking also that it was information.  The pump turns on in ecstasy, the cards fall where they fall, the world never misses a beat, the queen hides, the queen is found, and it was all information.”

— Stephen King, Hearts in Atlantis, August 2000 Pocket Books paperback, page 437

C.
  “I will show you, he thought, the war for us to die in, lady.  Sully your kind suffering child’s eyes with it.  Live burials beside slow rivers.  A pile of ears for a pile of arms.  The crisps of North Vietnamese drivers chained to their burned trucks…. Why, he wondered, is she smiling at me?”

— Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise,  Knopf hardcover, 1981, page 299

Sunday, January 17, 2010

Welcome to the Ape Stuff

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

NY Times obituary of Knox Burger,
book editor and agent, who died at 87 on January 4

"As a magazine editor in the 1950s, Knox Burger published Kurt Vonnegut’s first short story….

During Mr. Burger’s tenure at Collier’s, a short story by Vonnegut, whom he had known slightly when both were at Cornell and who was then working in public relations for General Electric, crossed his desk. He asked for changes, which Vonnegut made, and the story, 'Report on the Barnhouse Effect,' appeared in the magazine in February 1950. It was the first published work of fiction for Vonnegut, who recounted the episode decades later….

At least half a dozen authors… honored Mr. Burger by dedicating books to him. Vonnegut, who died in 2007, did, too. His dedication of Welcome to the Monkey House, a 1968 collection of short stories that included 'Report on the Barnhouse Effect,' read:

'To Knox Burger. Ten days older than I am. He has been a very good father to me.'"

A Jesuit at the
Gerard Manley Hopkins Archive

"Bisociation": The Act of Creation

"Koestler’s concept of ‘bisociation’… enters into the very ‘act of creation.’ In every such act, writes Koestler, the creator ‘bisociates,’ that is, combines, two ‘matrices’– two diverse patterns of knowing or perceiving– in a new way. As each matrix carries its own images, concepts, values, and ‘codes,’ the creative person brings together– ‘bisociates’– two diverse matrices not normally connected."

– Joseph J. Feeney, S.J.

Robert Stone in A Flag for Sunrise
(Knopf hardcover, 1981)–

"The eye you see him with is the same eye with which he sees you."

– Father Egan on page 333

Pablo on page 425–

"'…You know, he told me– that old man told me– the eye you look at it with, well, that's the eye it sees you with. That's what he told me.'

Holliwell was moved to recall an experiment he had once read about; he had clipped the report of it for his class. An experimenter endeavoring to observe chimpanzee behavior had fashioned a spy hole in the door of the animals' chamber through which he might watch them unobserved. Putting his eye to it, he had seen nothing more than what he finally identified as the eye of a chimpanzee on the other side of the door. Ape stuff."

More ape stuff from a Jesuit–

"This Jack, joke, poor potsherd, patch, matchwood, immortal diamond,
                Is immortal diamond."

— Gerard Manley Hopkins,
"That Nature is a Heraclitean Fire
and of the comfort of the Resurrection
"

More ape stuff from myself–

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10/100117-TradingPlaces.jpg

Problem: Perform this transformation
by combining the sorts of permutations allowed
in the diamond puzzle. A solution: click here.

Saturday, January 16, 2010

Annals of the…

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:20 AM

American Literary Historical Society
'Spy Game'-- Redford with binoculars, Pitt with camera

Robert Redford and Brad Pitt
in "Spy Game" (2001)

James Dean rises from coffin-- Photo by Dean Stock, LIFE magazine, 1955

James Dean in LIFE, 1955.

Photo by Dennis Stock,
who died on Monday.

"The eye you see him with
is the same eye
with which he sees you."

— Father Egan on page 333
of the classic Robert Stone novel
A Flag for Sunrise
(Knopf hardcover, 1981)

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Thursday February 19, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:07 AM

A Sunrise
for Sunrise

"If we open any tract– Plastic Art and Pure Plastic Art or The Non-Objective World, for instance– we will find that Mondrian and Malevich are not discussing canvas or pigment or graphite or any other form of matter. They are talking about Being or Mind or Spirit.  From their point of view, the grid is a staircase to the Universal, and they are not interested in what happens below in the Concrete."

Rosalind Krauss, "Grids"

Yesterday's entry featured a rather simple-minded example from Krauss of how the ninefold square (said to be a symbol of Apollo)

The 3x3 grid

may be used to create a graphic design– a Greek cross, which appears also in crossword puzzles:

Crossword-puzzle design that includes Greek-cross elements

Illustration by
Paul Rand
(born Peretz Rosenbaum)

A more sophisticated example
of the ninefold square
in graphic design:

"That old Jew
gave me this here."

— A Flag for Sunrise  

The 3x3 grid as an organizing frame for Chinese calligraphy. Example-- the character for 'sunrise'
From Paul-Rand.com

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Thursday February 12, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 11:11 AM
Headliners

Today, many observe
the 200th anniversary
of the birth of two
noted philosophers
of death:
Charles Darwin and
Abraham Lincoln.

A fitting headline:

FAUST VIVIFIES DEATH
(Harvard Crimson ,
February 7, 2008)

Happy birthday,
Cotton Mather.

Robert Stone,
A Flag for Sunrise :

Willow on tombstone from Lachlan Cranswick's homepage in Melbourne, Australia

"Our secret culture is as frivolous as a willow on a tombstone. It's a wonderful thing– or it was. It was strong and dreadful, it was majestic and ruthless. It was a stranger to pity. And it's not for sale, ladies and gentlemen."

Saturday, January 24, 2009

Saturday January 24, 2009

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:12 AM
Gift
 
(Click on image for details.)

Academic composer George Perle in 1999

"George Perle, a composer, author, theorist and teacher who won the Pulitzer Prize for music in 1986 and was widely considered the poetic voice of atonal composition, died on Friday [Jan. 23, 2009] at his home in Manhattan. He was 93."

The New York Times this morning

From this journal on June 15, 2004:

 

Bergman, Totentanz from 'The Seventh Seal'

Kierkegaard on death:

"I have thought too much about death not to know that he cannot speak earnestly about death who does not know how to employ (for awakening, please note) the subtlety and all the profound waggery which lies in death.  Death is not earnest in the same way the eternal is.  To the earnestness of death belongs precisely that capacity for awakening, that resonance of a profound mockery which, detached from the thought of the eternal, is an empty and often brash jest, but together with the thought of the eternal is just what it should be, utterly different from the insipid solemness which least of all captures and holds a thought with tension like that of death."

Works of Love,
  
Harper Torchbooks,
   1964, p. 324

For more on "the thought of the eternal," see the  discussion of the number 373 in Directions Out and Outside the World, both of 4/26/04.


See also
"That old Jew gave me this here."

Monday, December 29, 2008

Monday December 29, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:21 PM
The Gift
 

Plato's Diamond

Robert Stone,
A Flag for Sunrise:

"'That old Jew gave me this here.' Egan looked at the diamond. 'I ain't giving this to you, understand? The old man gave it to me for my boy. It's worth a whole lot of money– you can tell that just by looking– but it means something, I think. It's got a meaning, like.'

'Let's see,' Egan said, 'what would it mean?' He took hold of Pablo's hand cupping the stone and held his own hand under it. '"The jewel is in the lotus," perhaps that's what it means. The eternal in the temporal. The Boddhisattva declining nirvana out of compassion. Contemplating the ignorance of you and me, eh? That's a metaphor of our Buddhist friends.'

Pablo's eyes glazed over. 'Holy shit,' he said. 'Santa Maria.' He stared at the diamond in his palm with passion."

For further details, click on the diamond.

 

Related narratives:

Today's online Times on
the Saturday, Dec. 27,
death of an artist:

Robert Graham obituary, NY Times, 12/29/08

"Dale Wasserman… the playwright responsible for two Broadway hits of the 1960s, 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest' and 'Man of La Mancha,' died on Sunday [December 21, 2008] at his home in Paradise Valley, Ariz., near Phoenix….

Mr. Wasserman wrote more than 75 scripts for television, the stage and the movies, including screenplays for 'The Vikings' (1958), a seafaring epic with Tony Curtis and Kirk Douglas, and 'A Walk With Love and Death' (1969), a John Huston film set in 14th-century Europe….

He feuded with… John Huston, who gave the lead female role in 'Walk' to his teenage daughter, Anjelica, against Mr. Wasserman's wishes. And he never attended ceremonies to receive the awards he won."

Accepting for Mr. Wasserman:
Mr. Graham's widow,
Anjelica Huston

Anjelica Huston and Jack Nicholson

"Well…"

Friday, November 7, 2008

Friday November 7, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:11 AM
The Getaway

Log24 on St. Luke’s Day this year:

An example of lifestyle coverage at The New York Times— a 2006 story on visual art in Mexico that included a reference to…

Damien Hirst’s gory new series
 ‘The Death of God–
Towards a Better Understanding
of Life Without God
Aboard the Ship of Fools.’

For descriptions of such life, I prefer the literary art of Robert Stone– in particular, Stone’s novel A Flag for Sunrise.

Credit must be given to the Times for an excellent 1981 review of that novel.

The review’s conclusion:

A Flag for Sunrise is
 the best novel of ideas
 I’ve read since Dostoyevsky
 escaped from Omsk.”

The author of that review, John Leonard, died Wednesday, Nov. 5. This morning’s Times has his obituary.

Saturday, October 18, 2008

Saturday October 18, 2008

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:07 AM
Allure
(continued from
July 3, 2006)

This morning’s New York Times
has an obituary for the father
of the paper’s executive editor,
Bill Keller:

NY Times obituaries Saturday, Oct. 18, 2008

For more on George Keller and on
the more colorful Levi Stubbs,
who also died on Friday,
see the Times‘s AP obituaries.

Keller’s son Bill has emphasized
what he calls the “allure” of the
Times‘s lifestyles coverage.

An example of such coverage–
a 2006 story on visual art in Mexico
that included a reference to…

Damien Hirst’s gory new series
 ‘The Death of God–
Towards a Better Understanding
of Life Without God
Aboard the Ship of Fools.’

For descriptions of such life,
I prefer the literary art of
Robert Stone– in particular,
Stone’s novel
A Flag for Sunrise.

Credit must be given to
the Times for an excellent
1981 review of that novel.

(This was well before
the younger Keller
joined the Times in 1984.)

My own views on life are
less like those of either Keller
than like those of Stone and
perhaps of Levi Stubbs, the
other father figure who
died on Friday.

Related material:

“Yes, you’ll be goin’ loco
down in Acapulco,
the magic down there
 is so strong.”
— Levi Stubbs   

The Four Tops: Goin' Loco Down in Acapulco

Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Wednesday April 16, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:10 AM

Poetry for Physicists:
The Gates of Hell

From the obituary of physicist John Archibald Wheeler at Princeton:
 

In the fall of 1967, he was invited to give a talk…. As he spoke, he… [mentioned] something strange… what he called a gravitationally completely collapsed object. But such a phrase was a mouthful, he said, wishing aloud for a better name. "How about black hole?" someone shouted from the audience.

That was it. "I had been searching for just the right term for months, mulling it over in bed, in the bathtub, in my car, wherever I had quiet moments," he later said. "Suddenly this name seemed exactly right." He kept using the term, in lectures and on papers, and it stuck.

From Log24 last year on this date ("Happy Birthday, Benedict XVI"):
 

"Know the one about the Demiurge and the Abridgment of Hope?"

— Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise, Knopf, 1981, the final page, 439

From Dante, The Inferno, inscription on the gates of Hell:
 

"Abandon all hope, ye who enter."

From Psychoshop, an unfinished novel by Alfred Bester completed by Roger Zelazny:
 

His manner was all charm and grace; pure cafe society….

He purred a chuckle. "My place. If you want to come, I'll show you."

"Love to. The Luogo Nero? The Black Place?"

"That's what the locals call it. It's really Buoco Nero, the Black Hole."

"Like the Black Hole of Calcutta?"

"No. Black Hole as in astronomy. Corpse of a dead star, but also channel between this universe and its next-door neighbor."

"Here? In Rome?"

"Sure. They drift around in space until they run out of gas and come to a stop. This number happened to park here."

"How long ago?"

"No one knows," he said. "It was there six centuries before Christ, when the Etruscans took over a small town called Roma and began turning it into the capital of the world."

 

Related material:

Log24 on
narrative–

Life of the Party
(March 24, 2006),
and
'Nauts
(March 26, 2006)
 

Sunday, April 6, 2008

Sunday April 6, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:12 AM
For Sunrise

Charlton Heston as Ben-Hur in the New York Times online obituaries, morning of April 6, 2008

Click image to enlarge.

The above tableau, from this morning's
New York Times obituary page,
suggests the following meditations:

1. "Mickey Mouse will see you dead."
   — Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise
 
2. "Free!"
 
3. "I graduated in Alabama,
     Alaska, Arizona…."

These three meditations are
consistent with the fable of the
mice and the lion in The Lion,
The Witch, and the Wardrobe

and with the speech of
Aslan at the conclusion of
The Narnia Chronicles:

"The term is over: the holidays
have begun. The dream is
ended: this is the morning."

The rather depressing
"Death Notices" box
that has attracted
Charlton Heston's gaze
in the online obituaries
pictured above might
be replaced as follows:

A Hexagram for Charlton Heston-- Number 35: The sun rises above the earth

The Heston classic pictured
above is, let us recall,
based on a book titled
Ben-Hur: A Tale of
the Christ
.

"I know this man!"
— Charlton Heston

Time of this entry:
2:12:35.

Monday, August 6, 2007

Monday August 6, 2007

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 AM
The Divine Universals

"The tigers of wrath          
 are wiser than                
 the horses of instruction."

— William Blake,
Proverbs of Hell

From Shining Forth:

  The Place of the Lion, by Charles Williams, 1931, Chapter Eight:

"Besides, if this fellow were right, what harm would the Divine Universals do us? I mean, aren't the angels supposed to be rather gentle and helpful and all that?"

"You're doing what Marcellus warned you against… judging them by English pictures. All nightgowns and body and a kind of flacculent sweetness. As in cemeteries, with broken bits of marble. These are Angels– not a bit the same thing. These are the principles of the tiger and the volcano and the flaming suns of space."

 Under the Volcano, Chapter Two:

"But if you look at that sunlight there, then perhaps you'll get the answer, see, look at the way it falls through the window: what beauty can compare to that of a cantina in the early morning? Your volcanoes outside? Your stars– Ras Algethi? Antares raging south southeast? Forgive me, no." 

 A Spanish-English dictionary:

lucero m.
morning or evening star:
any bright star….
hole in a window panel
     for the admission of light….

Look at the way it
falls through the window….

— Malcolm Lowry

How art thou fallen from heaven,
O Lucifer, son of the morning!
— Isaiah 14:12

For more on Spanish
and the evening star,
see Plato, Pegasus, and
the Evening Star.

 Symmetry axes
of the square:

Symmetry axes of the square

(See Damnation Morning.)

From the cover of the
 Martin Cruz Smith novel
Stallion Gate:

Atom on cover of Stallion

"That old Jew
gave me this here."

Dialogue from the
Robert Stone novel
A Flag for Sunrise.

Related material:

A Mass for Lucero,

Log24, Sept. 13, 2006

Mathematics, Religion, Art

— and this morning's online
New York Times obituaries:

Cardinal Lustiger of Paris and jazz pianist Sal Mosca, New York Times obituaries on August 6, 2007

The above image contains summary obituaries for Cardinal Lustiger, Archbishop of Paris, 1981-2005, and for Sal Mosca, jazz pianist and teacher. In memory of the former, see all of the remarks preceding the image above. In memory of the latter, the remarks of a character in Martin Cruz Smith's Stallion Gate on jazz piano may have some relevance:

"I hate arguments. I'm a coward. Arguments are full of words, and each person is sure he's the only one who knows what the words mean. Each word is a basket of eels, as far as I'm concerned. Everybody gets to grab just one eel and that's his interpretation and he'll fight to the death for it…. Which is why I love music. You hit a C and it's a C and that's all it is. Like speaking clearly for the first time. Like being intelligent. Like understanding. A Mozart or an Art Tatum sits at the piano and picks out the undeniable truth."

Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Wednesday May 23, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:15 AM
Angel in the Details

See the Dickinson poem quoted here on May 15 (the date, as it happens, of Dickinson’s death) in the entry “A Flag for Sunrise.”  See also Zen and Language Games and a discussion of a detail in a Robert Stone novel.

“I dwell in Possibility –
A fairer House than Prose”

Emily Dickinson

Tuesday, May 15, 2007

Tuesday May 15, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 5:55 AM
A Flag for Sunrise

The title of the Robert Stone
novel comes from Emily Dickinson:

A Wife -- at daybreak I shall be --
Sunrise -- Hast thou a Flag for me?
At Midnight, I am but a Maid,
How short it takes to make a Bride --
Then -- Midnight, I have passed from thee
Unto the East, and Victory --

Midnight -- Good Night! I hear them call,
The Angels bustle in the Hall --
Softly my Future climbs the Stair,
I fumble at my Childhood's prayer
So soon to be a Child no more --
Eternity, I'm coming -- Sire,
Savior -- I've seen the face -- before!

Friday, April 20, 2007

Friday April 20, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:07 AM
Icons

Part I

The Library of Congress
Today in History, April 20:

“American sculptor Daniel Chester French was born in Exeter, New Hampshire on April 20, 1850. His colossal seated figure of Abraham Lincoln presides over the Lincoln Memorial.

Reared in Cambridge and Concord, Massachusetts, he was embraced by members of the Transcendentalist community including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Author and fellow Concord resident Louisa May Alcott encouraged young French to pursue a career as an artist. Louisa’s sister, artist May Alcott, was his early teacher.

French studied in Boston and New York prior to receiving his first commission for the 1875 statue The Minute Man. Standing near the North Bridge in Concord, in the Minute Man National Historical Park, this work commemorates events at the North Bridge, the site of ‘the shot heard ’round the world.’ An American icon, images derivative of The Minute Man statue appeared on defense bonds, stamps, and posters during World War II.”

Part II:

Entertainment Weekly,

November 7, 2003

Keanu Reeves, Entertainment Weekly, Nov. 7, 2003

Part III:

Log24 on the anniversary of
Lincoln’s assassination —

Saturday, April 14, 2007  4:30 AM

The Sun Also Sets, or…

This Way to
the Egress

Continued from April 12:

“I have only come here 
seeking knowledge,
 Things they would not   
       teach me of in college….”
 
— Synchronicity
lyrics

Quoted in Log24,
Time’s Labyrinth continued:

“The sacred axe was used to kill the King. The ritual had been the same since the beginning of time. The game of chess was merely a reenactment. Why hadn’t I recognized it before?”

— Katherine Neville,
The Eight,

Ballantine reprint, 1990,


“Know the one about
the Demiurge and the
Abridgment of Hope?”

— Robert Stone,
A Flag for Sunrise,
Knopf, 1981,
the final page

Part IV:

Log24 entry of

November 7, 2003

Nixon's the One button

— and a
student play from
Virginia Tech:

Play by Virginia Tech student

Part V:


Symmetry
for Beavis and Butt-Head

and
The Rhetoric of Scientism:

It’s a very ancient saying,
But a true and honest thought,
That if you become a teacher,
By your pupils you’ll be taught.

— Oscar Hammerstein,
“Getting to Know You”

Monday, April 16, 2007

Monday April 16, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:01 PM

The Abridgment of Hope

Part I: Framework

From Log24,
Here’s Your Sign,
Aug. 8, 2002–

“Paz also mentions the Christian concept of eternity as a realm outside time, and discusses what happened to modern thought after it abandoned the concept of eternity.

Naturally, many writers have dealt with the subject of time, but it seems particularly part of the Zeitgeist now, with a new Spielberg film about precognition.  My own small experience, from last night until today, may or may not have been precognitive.  I suspect it’s the sort of thing that many people often experience, a sort of ‘So that’s what that was about’ feeling.  Traditionally, such experience has been expressed in terms of a theological framework.”

Part II: Context

From Ann Copeland,
Faith and Fiction-Making:
The Catholic Context
“–

“Each of us is living out a once-only story which, unlike those mentioned here, has yet to reveal its ending. We live that story largely in the dark. From time to time we may try to plumb its implications, to decipher its latent design, or at least get a glimmer of how parts go together. Occasionally, a backward glance may suddenly reveal implications, an evolving pattern we had not discerned, couldn’t have when we were ‘in’ it. Ah, now I see what I was about, what I was after.”

Part III: Context Sensitivity

From Log24’s
Language Game,
Jan. 14, 2004–

Ludwig Wittgenstein,
Philosophical Investigations:

373. Grammar tells what kind of object anything is. (Theology as grammar.)

From Wikipedia

Another definition of context-sensitive grammars defines them as formal grammars where all productions are of the form

a yields b where the length of a is less than or equal to the length of b

Such a grammar is also called a monotonic or noncontracting grammar because none of the rules decreases the size of the string that is being rewritten.

If the possibility of adding the empty string to a language is added to the strings recognized by the noncontracting grammars (which can never include the empty string) then the languages in these two definitions are identical.

 Part IV: Abridgment

“Know the one about the Demiurge and the Abridgment of Hope?”

— Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise, Knopf, 1981, the final page, 439

Also from Stone’s novel, quoted by Ann Copeland in the above essay:

You after all? Inside, outside, round and about. Disappearing stranger, trickster. Christ, she thought, so far. Far from where?

But why always so far?

Por qué?” she asked. There was a guy yelling.

Always so far away. You. Always so hard on the kid here, making me be me right down the line. You old destiny. You of Jacob, you of Isaac, of Esau.

Let it be you after all. Whose after all I am. For whom I was nailed.

So she said to Campos: “Behold the handmaid of the Lord.” (416)

Saturday, April 14, 2007

Saturday April 14, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:31 PM
Entertainment Tonight

“What is the spirit of the bayonet?”

— United States Army
training question, 1964

A partial answer
in two parts:

Part I —

Another question —

“Know the one about
the Demiurge and the
Abridgment of Hope?”

— Robert Stone,
A Flag for Sunrise,
Knopf, 1981,
the final page, 439,
cited by page number
here this morning


Part II —

The image “http://www.log24.com/log07/saved/070414-PAlottery.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Today’s numbers, in
this morning’s context,
strongly suggest
a look at
A Flag for Sunrise,
by Robert Stone,
Knopf, 1981,

page 431,
and at
Hexagram 34,

The Power of the Great,
in the context of a
Log24 entry for
October 8, 2005
.

There is no teacher
but the enemy.

— Orson Scott Card,
Ender’s Game

Related entertainment:
the previous entry
and the Vietnam memoir
Black Virgin Mountain.

Saturday April 14, 2007

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:30 AM
This Way to
the Egress

Continued from April 12:

“I have only come here 
seeking knowledge,
 Things they would not   
       teach me of in college….”
 
— Synchronicity
lyrics

Quoted in Log24,
Time’s Labyrinth continued:

“The sacred axe was used to kill the King. The ritual had been the same since the beginning of time. The game of chess was merely a reenactment. Why hadn’t I recognized it before?”

— Katherine Neville,
The Eight,

Ballantine reprint, 1990,


“Know the one about
the Demiurge and the
Abridgment of Hope?”

— Robert Stone,
A Flag for Sunrise,
Knopf, 1981,
the final page:

page 439

Sunset Boulevard

Related material:

John Bartlett  (1820–1905),
Familiar Quotations,
10th edition, 1919,

page 439

Sunday, November 5, 2006

Sunday November 5, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Twilight Kingdom

"What he cannot contemplate is the reproach of

    … that final meeting
In the twilight kingdom,

when at length he may meet the eyes…."

On "The Hollow Men"

" … unless
The eyes reappear
As the perpetual star
Multifoliate rose
Of death's twilight kingdom"

Related readings from unholy scripture:

  The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/040604-Feeling.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

A.  The "long twilight struggle" speech of JFK

B.  "The Platters were singing 'Each day I pray for evening just to be with you,' and then it started to happen.  The pump turns on in ecstasy.  I closed my eyes, I held her with my eyes closed and went into her that way, that way you do, shaking all over, hearing the heel of my shoe drumming against the driver's-side door in a spastic tattoo, thinking that I could do this even if I was dying, even if I was dying, even if I was dying; thinking also that it was information.  The pump turns on in ecstasy, the cards fall where they fall, the world never misses a beat, the queen hides, the queen is found, and it was all information."

— Stephen King, Hearts in Atlantis, August 2000 Pocket Books paperback, page 437

C.
  "I will show you, he thought, the war for us to die in, lady.  Sully your kind suffering child's eyes with it.  Live burials beside slow rivers.  A pile of ears for a pile of arms.  The crisps of North Vietnamese drivers chained to their burned trucks…. Why, he wondered, is she smiling at me?"

— Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise,  Knopf hardcover, 1981, page 299

The image and A, B, C are from Log24 on June 4, 2004.
 

Tuesday, October 10, 2006

Tuesday October 10, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 8:00 PM
Mate in
Two Seconds

From Oct. 14 last year:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051014-Tick.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

From Oct. 13 last year
(Yom Kippur):

A Poem for Pinter
Oct. 13, 2005

The Guardian on Harold Pinter, winner of this year's Nobel Prize for Literature:

"Earlier this year, he announced his decision to retire from playwriting in favour of poetry,"

Michael Muskal in today's Los Angeles Times:

"Pinter, 75, is known for his sparse and thin style as well as his etched characters whose crystal patter cuts through the mood like diamond drill bits."

Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise (See Jan. 25):

"'That old Jew gave me this here.'  Egan looked at the diamond….  'It's worth a whole lot of money– you can tell that just by looking– but it means something, I think.  It's got a meaning, like.'

'Let's see,' Egan said, 'what would it mean?'  He took hold of Pablo's hand cupping the stone and held his own hand under it.  '"The jewel is in the lotus," perhaps that's what it means.  The eternal in the temporal….'"

Notes on Modal Logic:

"Modal logic was originally developed to investigate logic under the modes of necessary and possible truth.  The words 'necessary' and 'possible' are called modal connectives, or modalities.  A modality is a word that when applied to a statement indicates when, where, how, or under what circumstances the statement may be true.  In terms of notation, it is common to use a box [] for the modality 'necessary' and a diamond <> for the modality 'possible.'"

A Poem for Pinter

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051013-Waka.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Commentary:

"Waka" also means Japanese poem or Maori canoe.  (For instance, this Japanese poem and this Maori canoe.)

For a meditation on "bang splat," see Sept. 25-29.

For the meaning of "tick tick," see Emily Dickinson on "degreeless noon."

"Hash," of course, signifies "checkmate."  (See previous three entries.)

For language more suited to
the year's most holy day, see
this year's Yom Kippur entry,
from October 2.

That was also the day of the
Amish school killings in
Pennsylvania and the day that
mathematician Paul Halmos died.

For more on the former, see
Death in Two Seconds.

For more on the latter, see
The Halmos Tombstone.

4x9 black monolith

Friday, April 28, 2006

Friday April 28, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:19 AM

Poetry Month, continued
 

Was Heaven
Where You Thought?

(See previous entry.)

A partial answer:

Yesterday's Pennsylvania Lottery evening number was 432.

Poets and others who seek meaning in random numbers may, if they wish, consult page 432 of The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens.  They may also, having studied the Log24 entries of Holy Saturday (April 15, 2006), consult page 432 of A Flag For Sunrise.

Those who prefer the dictionary method of interpreting random numbers may consult page 432 of Webster's New World Dictionary, College Edition of 1960.  This page has a special meaning for those aware that Aslan's How is "home to the deepest magic Narnia has ever known." (Everything2.com)

Saturday, April 15, 2006

Saturday April 15, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 2:02 PM
High Society


(See previous entry,
on Francis L. Kellogg)\

More bookmarks, in the spirit of
  Hemingway rather than Fitzgerald,
 from the date of Kellogg's death–

New York State lottery
on April 6, 2006:

Mid-day: 338
 Evening: 323

From A Flag for Sunrise, page 338:

"She seemed, superficially, to have
thrown every grain of her energy
into the driving…. She was stone
beautiful, he thought; to his eye
outrageously and provocatively
beautiful…."

Related material:
 
Compare with Grace Kelly driving
Cary Grant in "To Catch a Thief"
and Frank Sinatra in "High Society."

Those who prefer a different sort
of high may also prefer a different
page in A Flag for Sunrise: 323.

"He was very high, higher than he
had ever been.  His thoughts
twisted off into spools,
arabesques, snatches of
music."

 Related material:

"Harrowing," from
Holy Saturday, 2003.

Monday, October 17, 2005

Monday October 17, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Place

“Critics have compared Mr. Stone to Conrad, Faulkner, Hemingway, Graham Greene, Malcolm Lowry, Nathanael West; all apt enough, but there’s a James T. Farrell, Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett strain as well – a hard-edged, lonely intelligence that sets bright promise off against stark failure and deals its mordant hand lightly. In A Flag for Sunrise (1981), an anthropologist observes: ‘There’s always a place for God. . . . There is some question as to whether He’s in it.'”

—  Jean Strouse on Robert Stone

“When times are mysterious
Serious numbers will always be heard
And after all is said and done
And the numbers all come home
The four rolls into three
The three turns into two
And the two becomes a
One”

— Paul Simon,
    “When Numbers Get Serious,” from
    “Hearts and Bones”  album, 1983

“Hickory Dickory Dock….”

Anonymous folk tune

Thursday, October 13, 2005

Thursday October 13, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: , , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

A Poem for Pinter

The Guardian on Harold Pinter, winner of this year's Nobel Prize for Literature:

"Earlier this year, he announced his decision to retire from playwriting in favour of poetry,"

Michael Muskal in today's Los Angeles Times:

"Pinter, 75, is known for his sparse and thin style as well as his etched characters whose crystal patter cuts through the mood like diamond drill bits."

Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise  (See Jan. 25):

"'That old Jew gave me this here.'  Egan looked at the diamond….  'It's worth a whole lot of money– you can tell that just by looking– but it means something, I think.  It's got a meaning, like.'

'Let's see,' Egan said, 'what would it mean?'  He took hold of Pablo's hand cupping the stone and held his own hand under it.  '"The jewel is in the lotus," perhaps that's what it means.  The eternal in the temporal….'"

Notes on Modal Logic:

"Modal logic was originally developed to investigate logic under the modes of necessary  and possible  truth.  The words 'necessary' and 'possible' are called modal connectives , or modalities .  A modality is a word that when applied to a statement indicates when, where, how, or under what circumstances the statement may be true.  In terms of notation, it is common to use a box [] for the modality 'necessary' and a diamond <> for the modality 'possible.'"

A Poem for Pinter

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051013-Waka.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Commentary:

"Waka" also means Japanese poem or Maori canoe.

(For instance, this Japanese poem and this Maori canoe.)

For a meditation on "bang splat," see Sept. 25-29.

For the meaning of "tick tick," see Emily Dickinson on "degreeless noon."

"Hash," of course, signifies "checkmate."  (See previous three entries.)

Tuesday, January 25, 2005

Tuesday January 25, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Diamonds Are Forever

 
The image “http://www.log24.com/theory/images/Modal-diamondinbox.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 

Robert Stone,
A Flag for Sunrise:

" 'That old Jew gave me this here.'  Egan looked at the diamond.  'I ain't giving this to you, understand?  The old man gave it to me for my boy.  It's worth a whole lot of money– you can tell that just by looking– but it means something, I think.  It's got a meaning, like.'

'Let's see,' Egan said, 'what would it mean?'  He took hold of Pablo's hand cupping the stone and held his own hand under it.  '"The jewel is in the lotus," perhaps that's what it means.  The eternal in the temporal.  The Boddhisattva declining nirvana out of compassion.   Contemplating the ignorance of you and me, eh?  That's a metaphor of our Buddhist friends.'

Pablo's eyes glazed over.  'Holy shit,' he said.  'Santa Maria.'  He stared at the diamond in his palm with passion.

'Hey,' he said to the priest, 'diamonds are forever!  You heard of that, right?  That means something, don't it?'

'I have heard it,' Egan said.  'Perhaps it has a religious meaning.' "
 


"We symbolize logical necessity
with the box (box.gif (75 bytes))
and logical possibility
with the diamond (diamond.gif (82 bytes))."

Keith Allen Korcz

From

DIALECTIC AND EXISTENCE
IN KIERKEGAARD AND KANT

Nythamar Fernandes de Oliveira

Pontifical Catholic University
at Porto Alegre, Brazil

"Such is the paradoxical 'encounter' of the eternal with the temporal. Just like the Moment of the Incarnation, when the Eternal entered the temporal, Kierkegaard refers to the category of the Instant (Danish Ojeblikket, 'a glance of the eye, eyeblink,' German Augenblick) as the dialectical kernel of our existential consciousness:

If the instant is posited, so is the eternal –but also the future, which comes again like the past … The concept around which everything turns in Christianity, the concept which makes all things new, is the fullness of time, is the instant as eternity, and yet this eternity is at once the future and the past.

Although I cannot examine here the Kierkegaardian conception of time, the dialectical articulation of time and existence, as can be seen, underlies his entire philosophy of existence, just as the opposition between 'eternity' and 'temporality': the instant, as 'an atom of eternity,' serves to restructure the whole synthesis of selfhood into a spiritual one, in man’s 'ascent' toward its Other and the Unknown. In the last analysis, the Eternal transcends every synthesis between eternity and time, infinity and finiteness, preserving not only the Absolute Paradox in itself but above all the wholly otherness of God. It is only because of the Eternal, therefore, that humans can still hope to attain their ultimate vocation of becoming a Chistian. As Kierkegaard writes in Works of Love (1847),

The possibility of the good is more than possibility, for it is the eternal. This is the basis of the fact that one who hopes can never be deceived, for to hope is to expect the possibility of the good; but the possibility of the good is eternal. …But if there is less love in him, there is also less of the eternal in him; but if there is less of the eternal in him, there is also less possibility, less awareness of possibility (for possibility appears through the temporal movement of the eternal within the eternal in a human being)."

Sunday, January 16, 2005

Sunday January 16, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Death and the
Spirit, Part II

Readings

Are you a lucky little lady
in The City of Light
Or just another lost angel…
City of Night

— Jim Morrison, L.A. Woman

Fourmillante cité,
cité pleine de rêves,
Où le spectre en plein jour
raccroche le passant

— Baudelaire,
Les Fleurs du Mal,
and T. S. Eliot,
Notes to The Waste Land

"When you got the mojo, brother —
when you're on the inside —
the world is fantastic."

— Pablo Tabor in Robert Stone's
A Flag for Sunrise
,
Knopf, 1981, p. 428

Now it was Avril's turn to understand and he was frightened out of his wits.

"The Science of Luck," he said cautiously. "You watch, do you?  That takes a lot of self-discipline."

"Of course it does, but it's worth it.  I watch everything, all the time.  I'm one of the lucky ones.  I've got the gift.  I knew it when I was a kid, but I didn't grasp it."  The murmur had intensified.  "This last time, when I was alone so long, I got it right.  I watch for every opportunity and I never do the soft thing.  That's why I succeed."

Avril was silent for a long time.  "It is the fashion," he said at last.  "You've been reading the Frenchmen, I suppose?  Or no, no, perhaps you haven't.  How absurd of me."

"Don't blether."  The voice, stripped of all its disguises, was harsh and naive.  "You always blethered.  You never said anything straight.  What do you know about the Science of Luck?  Go on, tell me.  You're the only one who's understood at all.  Have you ever heard of it before?"

"Not under that name."

"I don't suppose you have.  That's my name for it.  What's its real name?"

"The Pursuit of Death."

— Margery Allingham,
Chapter Seventeen,
"On the Staircase," from
The Tiger in the Smoke

Anagrams

In memory of Danny Sugerman,
late manager of The Doors:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050116-Sugerman.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Danny Sugerman
Photo by
Frank Alan Bella, 2002

"Mr Mojo Risin" = "Jim Morrison."
"Audible Era" = "Baudelaire."
"Bad Rumi" = "Rimbaud."

From the dark jungle
as a tiger bright,
Form from the viewless Spirit
leaps to light.

— Rumi,  "Reality and Appearance,"
translated by R. A. Nicholson

(See also Death and the Spirit
from Twelfth Night, 2005, the date
of Danny Sugerman's death.)
 

Friday, September 17, 2004

Friday September 17, 2004

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 12:00 PM

God is in…
The Details

From an entry for Aug. 19, 2003 on
conciseness, simplicity, and objectivity:

Above: Dr. Harrison Pope, Harvard professor of psychiatry, demonstrates the use of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale "block design" subtest.

Another Harvard psychiatrist, Armand Nicholi, is in the news lately with his book The Question of God: C.S. Lewis and Sigmund Freud Debate God, Love, Sex, and the Meaning of Life.

Pope

Nicholi

Old
Testament
Logos

New
Testament
Logos

For the meaning of the Old-Testament logos above, see the remarks of Plato on the immortality of the soul at

Cut-the-Knot.org.

For the meaning of the New-Testament logos above, see the remarks of R. P. Langlands at

The Institute for Advanced Study.

On Harvard and psychiatry: see

The Crimson Passion:
A Drama at Mardi Gras

(February 24, 2004)

This is a reductio ad absurdum of the Harvard philosophy so eloquently described by Alston Chase in his study of Harvard and the making of the Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski.  Kaczynski's time at Harvard overlapped slightly with mine, so I may have seen him in Cambridge at some point.  Chase writes that at Harvard, the Unabomber "absorbed the message of positivism, which demanded value-neutral reasoning and preached that (as Kaczynski would later express it in his journal) 'there is no logical justification for morality.'" I was less impressed by Harvard positivism, although I did benefit from a course in symbolic logic from Quine.  At that time– the early 60's– little remained at Harvard of what Robert Stone has called "our secret culture," that of the founding Puritans– exemplified by Cotton and Increase Mather.

From Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise:

"Our secret culture is as frivolous as a willow on a tombstone.  It's a wonderful thing– or it was.  It was strong and dreadful, it was majestic and ruthless.  It was a stranger to pity.  And it's not for sale, ladies and gentlemen."

Some traces of that culture:

A web page
in Australia:

A contemporary
Boston author:

Click on pictures for details.

A more appealing view of faith was offered by PBS on Wednesday night, the beginning of this year's High Holy Days:

Armand Nicholi: But how can you believe something that you don't think is true, I mean, certainly, an intelligent person can't embrace something that they don't think is true — that there's something about us that would object to that.

Jeremy Fraiberg: Well, the answer is, they probably do believe it's true.

Armand Nicholi: But how do they get there? See, that's why both Freud and Lewis was very interested in that one basic question. Is there an intelligence beyond the universe? And how do we answer that question? And how do we arrive at the answer of that question?

Michael Shermer: Well, in a way this is an empirical question, right? Either there is or there isn't.

Armand Nicholi: Exactly.

Michael Shermer: And either we can figure it out or we can't, and therefore, you just take the leap of faith or you don't.

Armand Nicholi: Yeah, now how can we figure it out?

Winifred Gallagher: I think something that was perhaps not as common in their day as is common now — this idea that we're acting as if belief and unbelief were two really radically black and white different things, and I think for most people, there's a very — it's a very fuzzy line, so that —

Margaret Klenck: It's always a struggle.

Winifred Gallagher: Rather than — I think there's some days I believe, and some days I don't believe so much, or maybe some days I don't believe at all.

Doug Holladay: Some hours.

Winifred Gallagher: It's a, it's a process. And I think for me the big developmental step in my spiritual life was that — in some way that I can't understand or explain that God is right here right now all the time, everywhere.

Armand Nicholi: How do you experience that?

Winifred Gallagher: I experience it through a glass darkly, I experience it in little bursts. I think my understanding of it is that it's, it's always true, and sometimes I can see it and sometimes I can't. Or sometimes I remember that it's true, and then everything is in Technicolor. And then most of the time it's not, and I have to go on faith until the next time I can perhaps see it again. I think of a divine reality, an ultimate reality, uh, would be my definition of God.

Winifred
Gallagher

Sangaku

Gallagher seemed to be the only participant in the PBS discussion that came close to the Montessori ideals of conciseness, simplicity, and objectivity.  Dr. Montessori intended these as ideals for teachers, but they seem also to be excellent religious values.  Just as the willow-tombstone seems suited to Geoffrey Hill's style, the Pythagorean sangaku pictured above seems appropriate to the admirable Gallagher.

Friday, June 4, 2004

Friday June 4, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 11:22 AM

Feel lucky?
Well, do you?

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/040604-Sting.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/040604-Lucky.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.  This entry was inspired by the following…
1.  A British blogger’s comment today.  This man, feeling like a miserable failure himself, was cheered up by the following practical joke: “If really fed up you could try putting in, miserable failure, (no quote marks) into Google and pressing the ‘I’m feeling lucky’ button.”

2. The page, excerpts from which are shown  above, that you get if you put lucky (no quote marks) into Google and press the “I’m feeling lucky” button.

3. My own entries of May 31 on Language Games and of June 1 on language and history,  Seize the Day and One Brief  Shining Moment.

4.  The related June 1 entry of Loren Webster, Carpe Diem, on the Marilyn Monroe rose.  Images from Carpe and Shining are combined below:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix04A/040604-Feeling.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

5.  The fact that the “day” to be seized in Language Games is numbered 22, and that on day 22 of November 1963,  the  following died:

C. S. Lewis
John F. Kennedy
  Aldous Huxley.

6. The fact that November 22 is the feast of  Cecilia, patron saint of music.

7. Yesterday’s entry about the alignment of stars, combined with the alignment of Venus with Apollo (i. e., the sun) scheduled for June 8.

All of the above suggest the following readings from unholy scripture:

A.  The “long twilight struggle” speech of JFK

B.  “The Platters were singing ‘Each day I pray for evening just to be with you,’ and then it started to happen.  The pump turns on in ecstasy.  I closed my eyes, I held her with my eyes closed and went into her that way, that way you do, shaking all over, hearing the heel of my shoe drumming against the driver’s-side door in a spastic tattoo, thinking that I could do this even if I was dying, even if I was dying, even if I was dying; thinking also that it was information.  The pump turns on in ecstasy, the cards fall where they fall, the world never misses a beat, the queen hides, the queen is found, and it was all information.”

— Stephen King, Hearts in Atlantis, August 2000 Pocket Books paperback, page 437

C.  “I will show you, he thought, the war for us to die in, lady.  Sully your kind suffering child’s eyes with it.  Live burials beside slow rivers.  A pile of ears for a pile of arms.  The crisps of North Vietnamese drivers chained to their burned trucks…. Why, he wondered, is she smiling at me?”

— Robert Stone, A Flag for Sunrise,  Knopf hardcover, 1981, page 299

Sunday, January 18, 2004

Sunday January 18, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 AM

Go Leonards

Yesterday's entry may be viewed as honoring Saint Leonard Eugene Dickson, who died on January 17, 1954.  Dickson was the author of the three-volume classic

History of the Theory of Numbers.

Yesterday's entry was also prompted by a property of the number 17, and therefore may serve to illustrate a recurring theme… "The eternal in the temporal," an apt phrase uttered by Father Egan on page 373 of Robert Stone's religious classic,

A Flag for Sunrise.

Click on the above link for an appreciation of the Stone novel by Reynolds Price, one of the few Christians whose opinion I respect.

See also some remarks by Price from the feast day, Nov. 6, of the official Saint Leonard.

For a different Saint Leonard, see the entry of Oct. 14, 2003, which contains remarks by Leonard Bernstein on Mahler.

For a musical event that may be regarded as the fruition of Bernstein's remarks, see

Pope in peace concert

Vatican invites rabbis, Muslim clerics
for concert featuring
Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

By Dennis B. Roddy,
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette,
Sunday, January 18, 2004

Saturday, December 20, 2003

Saturday December 20, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 5:00 PM

White, Geometric, and Eternal

This afternoon's surfing:

Prompted by Edward Rothstein's own Fides et Ratio encyclical in today's NY Times, I googled him.

At the New York Review of Books, I came across the following by Rothstein:

"… statements about TNT can be represented within TNT: the formal system can, in a precise way, 'talk' about itself."

This naturally prompted me to check what is on TNT on this, the feast day of St. Emil Artin.  At 5 PM this afternoon, we have Al Pacino in "The Devil's Advocate" — a perfect choice for the festival of an alleged saint.

Preparing for Al, I meditated on the mystical significance of the number 373, as explained in Zen and Language Games: the page number 373 in Robert Stone's theological classic A Flag for Sunrise conveys the metaphysical significance of the phrase "diamonds are forever" — "the eternal in the temporal," according to Stone's Catholic priest.  This suggests a check of another theological classic, Pynchon's Gravity's RainbowPage 373 there begins with the following description of prewar Berlin:

"white and geometric."

This suggests the following illustration of a white and geometric object related to yesterday's entry on Helmut Wielandt:

From antiquark.com

Figure 1

(This object, which illustrates the phrase "makin' the changes," also occurs in this morning's entry on the death of a jazz musician.)

A further search for books containing "white" and "geometric" at Amazon.com yields the following:

Figure 2

From Mosaics, by
Fassett, Bahouth, and Patterson:

"A risco fountain in Mexico city, begun circa 1740 and made up of Mexican pottery and Chinese porcelain, including Ming.

The delicate oriental patterns on so many different-sized plates and saucers [are] underlined by the bold blue and white geometric tiles at the base."

Note that the tiles are those of Diamond Theory; the geometric object in figure 1 above illustrates a group that plays a central role in that theory.

Finally, the word "risco" (from Casa del Risco) associated with figure 2 above leads us to a rather significant theological site associated with the holy city of Santiago de Compostela:

Figure 3

Vicente Risco's
Dedalus in Compostela.

Figure 3 shows James Joyce (alias Dedalus), whose daughter Lucia inspired the recent entry Jazz on St. Lucia's Day — which in turn is related, by last night's 2:45 entry and by Figure 1, to the mathematics of group theory so well expounded by the putative saint Emil Artin.

"His lectures are best described as
polished diamonds."
Fine Hall in its Golden Age,
by Gian-Carlo Rota

If Pynchon plays the role of devil's advocate suggested by his creation, in Gravity's Rainbow, of the character Emil Bummer, we may hope that Rota, no longer in time but now in eternity, can be persuaded to play the important role of saint's advocate for his Emil.
 

Update of 6:30 PM 12/20/03:

Riddled:

The Absolutist Faith
of The New York Times

White and Geometric, but not Eternal.

Friday, May 2, 2003

Friday May 2, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:15 PM

ART WARS:

The following flashback to March 2002 seems a suitable entry for May, which is Mental Health Month.

Zen and Language Games

by Steven H. Cullinane
on March First, 2002

Two Experts Speak —

A Jew on Language Games

From On Certainty, by Ludwig Wittgenstein (Oxford, Basil Blackwell, 1969):

#508: What can I rely on?
#509: I really want to say that a language game is only possible if one trusts something. (I did not say “can trust something”).
— Quoted by Hilary Putnam in Renewing Philosophy, Chapter 8 (Harvard University Press, 1992)

An Arab on Deconstruction

From “Deconstructing Postmodernism,” by Ziauddin Sardar, at the website “The Free Arab Voice”:

Doubt, the perpetual and perennial condition of postmodernism, is best described by the motto of the cult television series The X-files: ‘Trust no One’….

Deconstruction – the methodology of discursive analysis – is the norm of postmodernism. Everything has to be deconstructed. But once deconstruction has reached its natural conclusion, we are left with a grand void: there is nothing, but nothing, that can remotely provide us with meaning, with a sense of direction, with a scale to distinguish good from evil.

Those who, having reviewed a thousand years of lies by Jews, Arabs, and Christians, are sick of language games, and who are also offended by the recent skillful deconstruction of the World Trade Center, may find some religious solace in the philosophy of Zen.

Though truth may be very hard to find in the pages of most books, the page numbers are generally reliable. This leads to the following Zen meditations.

From a review of the film “The Terminator”:

Some like to see Sarah as a sort of Mother of God, and her son as the saviour in a holy context. John Connor, J.C. , but these initials are also those of the director, so make up your own mind.
— http://www.geocities.com/
   hackettweb2/terminator.html

From a journal note on religion, science, and the meaning of life written in 1998 on the day after Sinatra died and the Pennsylvania lottery number came up “256”:

“What is 256 about?”
— S. H. Cullinane

From Michael Crichton’s Rising Sun (Ballantine paperback, 1993) —
John Connor (aka J. C.) offers the following metaphysical comment on the page number that appears above his words (256):

“It seems to be.”
“Is your investigation finished?”
“For all practical purposes, yes,” Connor said.

Connor is correct. The number 256 does indeed seem to be, and indeed it seemed to be again only yesterday evening, when the Pennsylvania lottery again made a metaphysical statement.

Our Zen meditation on the trustworthiness of page numbers concludes with another passage from Rising Sun, this time on page 373:

Connor sighed.
“The clock isn’t moving.”

Here J. C. offers another trenchant comment on his current page number.

The metaphysical significance of 373, “the eternal in the temporal,” is also discussed in the Buddhist classic A Flag for Sunrise, by Robert Stone (Knopf hardcover, 1981)… on, of course, page 373.

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