Log24

Monday, May 28, 2007

Monday May 28, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 5:00 PM
Space-Time
and a Finite Model

Notes by Steven H. Cullinane
May 28, 2007

Part I: A Model of Space-Time

The following paper includes a figure illustrating Penrose's model of  "complexified, compactified Minkowski space-time as the Klein quadric in complex projective 5-space."
 
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070528-Twistor.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
Click on picture to enlarge.

For some background on the Klein quadric and space-time, see Roger Penrose, "On the Origins of Twistor Theory," from Gravitation and Geometry: A Volume in Honor of Ivor Robinson, Bibliopolis, 1987.


Part II: A Corresponding Finite Model

The Klein quadric also occurs in a finite model of projective 5-space.  See a 1910 paper:

G. M. Conwell, The 3-space PG(3,2) and its group, Ann. of Math. 11, 60-76.

Conwell discusses the quadric, and the related Klein correspondence, in detail.  This is noted in a more recent paper by Philippe Cara:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix07/070528-Quadric.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

As Cara goes on to explain, the Klein correspondence underlies Conwell's discussion of eight heptads.  These play an important role in another correspondence, illustrated in the Miracle Octad Generator of R. T. Curtis, that may be used to picture actions of the large Mathieu group M24.


Related material:

 

The projective space PG(5,2), home of the Klein quadric in the finite model, may be viewed as the set of 64 points of the affine space AG(6,2), minus the origin.

The 64 points of this affine space may in turn be viewed as the 64 hexagrams of the Classic of Transformation, China's I Ching.

There is a natural correspondence between the 64 hexagrams and the 64 subcubes of a 4x4x4 cube.  This correspondence leads to a natural way to generate the affine group AGL(6,2).  This may in turn be viewed as a group of over a trillion natural transformations of the 64 hexagrams.

Geometry of the I Ching.
 
"Once Knecht confessed to his teacher that he wished to learn enough to be able to incorporate the system of the I Ching into the Glass Bead Game.  Elder Brother laughed.  'Go ahead and try,' he exclaimed.  'You'll see how it turns out.  Anyone can create a pretty little bamboo garden in the world.  But I doubt that the gardener would succeed in incorporating the world in his bamboo grove.'"
 
— Hermann Hesse, The Glass Bead Game,
  translated by Richard and Clara Winston
 

2 Comments

  1. Thanks for this.

    Are you familar with Terence McKenna’s work with I Ching?

    Comment by SuSu — Tuesday, May 29, 2007 @ 3:02 PM

  2. No, and I don’t want to be. I checked out McKenna and found this site on the aging druggie. I didn’t like the hippie scene in the sixties and I don’t like it now. Booze was always my drug of choice. Still, checking further, I found that McKenna’s afterword to Dick’s In Pursuit of Valis was well written.

    Related material:

    Ontology Alignment,
    Three Souls,
    Second Billing,
    and Logos.

    Comment by m759&nextdate=5%2F3%2F2006+23%3A59%3A59.999" target="_blank — Tuesday, May 29, 2007 @ 7:09 PM

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