Log24

Thursday, February 3, 2011

Brightness at Noon (continued)

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

"The predicate of bright origin"

— A phrase of Wallace Stevens from "An Ordinary Evening in New Haven" (1950)

Perhaps the predicate Stevens means is "bright."

If so, an apt illustration can be found on the cover of
the 1943 first edition of Hesse's Glasperlenspiel

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110203-Glasperlenspiel1943-Detail.jpg

See also Stevens's use of the phrase "heaven-haven" in "Notes" (1942),
the original plan of New Haven, and related scholia in this journal.

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11/110203-Scholia.jpg

… Todo lo sé por el lucero puro
que brilla en la diadema de la Muerte.

– Rubén Darío

An academic work from 2003 discusses Stevens's "Notes" as
"a perfect geometric whole."

Note that "perfect" means "complete, finished, done."

Summa Mythologica, continued…

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 10:30 AM

Yesterday's New York Lottery— Midday 392, Evening 946.

Catechism of the Catholic Church

392   Scripture speaks of a sin of these angels. This "fall" consists in the free choice of these created spirits, who radically and irrevocably rejected  God and his reign. We find a reflection of that rebellion in the tempter's words to our first parents: "You will be like God." The devil "has sinned from the beginning"; he is "a liar and the father of lies."

946   After confessing "the holy catholic Church," the Apostles' Creed adds "the communion of saints." In a certain sense this article is a further explanation of the preceding: "What is the Church if not the assembly of all the saints?" The communion of saints is the Church.

Some context related to last night's Rite of Change

Glasperlenspiel  Philosophy.

Those who prefer Dan Brown to Hermann Hesse may consult Fast Forward.

Sunday, November 21, 2010

Fast Forward

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 AM

Dan Brown, a sculpture at CIA headquarters, and secret codes are discussed at the bottom of today's New York Times  front page.

In this vein, here is a meditation on Religion and Time  (continued from Kurt Vonnegut's birthday)—

At the end of "Three Days of the Condor," Cliff Robertson asks Robert Redford, "How do you know they'll print it?"

One possible answer: "They always print… the lottery."

The New York Lottery on Saturday, November 20, 2010: Midday 704, Evening 687.

Here 704 suggests 7/04, the Fourth of July, which in turn suggests this journal's post on that date about random numbers and universal wisdom.

Moving further up on the front page of today's New York Times

http://www.log24.com/log/pix10B/101121-SundayTimesSm.jpg

"Their brains are rewarded not for staying on task but for jumping to the next thing…. The worry is we’re raising a generation of kids in front of screens whose brains are going to be wired differently.”— A worried professor at Harvard Medical School

For that new generation… Live from New York, it's Universal Wisdom! — In other words, 687!

Returning to the lottery hermeneutics (look it up, dudes) of July 4th, we note that a rather arcane and archaic procedure on a Windows PC keyboard— "Num Lock + Alt + 687"— produces the symbol known as a right guillemet».  This mark, which can stand for "fast forward," may symbolize to the old Slow-Forward Generation the fears of the Harvard professor for the new Differently-Wired Generation.

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