Log24

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Stakeholder Theory

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:10 AM

Monday, July 13, 2020

Unpoetic License

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:21 AM

The above novel uses extensively the term “inscape.”
The term’s originator, a 19th-century Jesuit poet,
is credited . . . sort of.  For other uses of the term,
search for Inscape in this journal. From that search —

A quote from a 1962 novel

“There’s something phoney
in the whole setup, Meg thought.
There is definitely something rotten
in the state of Camazotz.”

Addendum for the Church of Synchronology

The Joe Hill novel above was published (in hardcover)
on Walpurgisnacht —April 30, 2013.  See also this journal
on that date.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Logline

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 9:29 AM

Found this morning in a search:

logline  is a one-sentence summary of your script.
www.scriptologist.com/Magazine/Tips/Logline/logline.html
It’s the short blurb in TV guides that tells you what a movie
is about and helps you decide if you’re interested 

The search was suggested by a screenwriting weblog post,
Loglines: WHAT are you doing?“.

What is your story about?
No, seriously, WHAT are you writing about?
Who are the characters? What happens to them?
Where does it take place? What’s the theme?
What’s the style? There are nearly a million
little questions to answer when you set out
to tell a story. But it all starts with one
super, overarching question.
What are you writing about? This is the first
big idea that we pull out of the ether, sometimes
before we even have any characters.
What is your story about?

The screenwriting post was found in an earlier search for
the highlighted phrase.

The screenwriting post was dated December 15, 2009.

What I am doing now  is checking for synchronicity.

This  weblog on December 15, 2009, had a post
titled A Christmas Carol. That post referred to my 1976
monograph titled Diamond Theory .

I guess the script I’m summarizing right now is about
the heart of that theory, a group of 322,560 permutations
that preserve the symmetry of a family of graphic designs.

For that group in action, see the Diamond 16 Puzzle.

The “super overarching” phrase was used to describe
this same group in a different context:

IMAGE- Anne Taormina on 'Mathieu Moonshine' and the 'super overarching symmetry group'

This is from “Mathieu Moonshine,” a webpage by Anne Taormina.

A logline summarizing my  approach to that group:

Finite projective geometry explains
the surprising symmetry properties
of some simple graphic designs—
found, for instance, in quilts.

The story thus summarized is perhaps not destined for movie greatness.

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