Log24

Thursday, February 28, 2019

Previn’s Wake

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 1:19 PM

A search for Previn in this  journal yields . . . 

"whyse Salmonson set his seel on a hexengown,"
Finnegans Wake Book II, Episode 2, pp. 296-297

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Name Space

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 1:10 AM

A correction at Wikipedia  (Click to enlarge.) —

That this correction is needed indicates that the phrase 
"Cullinane space" might be useful. (Click to enlarge.)

On a 16-point space with some remarkable properties

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Namespace

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:21 AM

See other posts now tagged Namespace.

Monday, January 21, 2019

Fall, 1939

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:48 AM

She'll always have Paris.

Meditation for the Champ de Mors

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 AM

"his onesidemissing for an allblind alley
leading to an Irish plot in the Champ de Mors"
— James Joyce, Finnegans Wake

Sunday, January 20, 2019

Scope Resolution

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 9:00 AM

Wikipedia on a programming term

The scope resolution operator helps to identify
and specify the context to which an identifier refers,
particularly by specifying a namespace. The specific
uses vary across different programming languages
with the notions of scoping.  In many languages
the scope resolution operator is written

 "::".

In a completely different context, these four dots might represent
a geometric object  — the four-point plane .

Saturday, January 19, 2019

Spinning the Wake

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:32 PM

Friday, January 18, 2019

Location, Location, Location

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:01 PM

See also, from a post of November 1, 2018

The Woke Grids …

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:45 AM

… as opposed to The Dreaming Jewels .

A July 2014 Amsterdam master's thesis on the Golay code
and Mathieu group —

"The properties of G24 and M24 are visualized by
four geometric objects:  the icosahedron, dodecahedron,
dodecadodecahedron, and the cubicuboctahedron."

Some "geometric objects"  — rectangular, square, and cubic arrays —
are even more fundamental than the above polyhedra.

A related image from a post of Dec. 1, 2018

Sunday, December 16, 2018

Interlocking

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:30 PM

http://m759.net/wordpress/?s=Eddington+Song

'The Eddington Song'

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Sunday School

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 AM

Analogy

Thursday, February 5, 2009

Thursday February 5, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , , — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Through the
Looking Glass:

A Sort of Eternity

From the new president's inaugural address:

"… in the words of Scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things."

The words of Scripture:

9 For we know in part, and we prophesy in part.
10 But when that which is perfect is come, then that which is in part shall be done away.
11 When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things.
12 For now we see through a glass, darkly, but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.

 

First Corinthians 13

"through a glass"

[di’ esoptrou].
By means of
a mirror [esoptron]
.

Childish things:

Froebel's third gift, the eightfold cube
© 2005 The Institute for Figuring
 
Photo by Norman Brosterman
fom the Inventing Kindergarten
exhibit at The Institute for Figuring
(co-founded by Margaret Wertheim)

 

Not-so-childish:

Three planes through
the center of a cube
that split it into
eight subcubes:
Cube subdivided into 8 subcubes by planes through the center
Through a glass, darkly:

A group of 8 transformations is
generated by affine reflections
in the above three planes.
Shown below is a pattern on
the faces of the 2x2x2 cube
 that is symmetric under one of
these 8 transformations–
a 180-degree rotation:

Design Cube 2x2x2 for demonstrating Galois geometry

(Click on image
for further details.)

But then face to face:

A larger group of 1344,
rather than 8, transformations
of the 2x2x2 cube
is generated by a different
sort of affine reflections– not
in the infinite Euclidean 3-space
over the field of real numbers,
but rather in the finite Galois
3-space over the 2-element field.

Galois age fifteen, drawn by a classmate.

Galois age fifteen,
drawn by a classmate.

These transformations
in the Galois space with
finitely many points
produce a set of 168 patterns
like the one above.
For each such pattern,
at least one nontrivial
transformation in the group of 8
described above is a symmetry
in the Euclidean space with
infinitely many points.

For some generalizations,
see Galois Geometry.

Related material:

The central aim of Western religion–

 

"Each of us has something to offer the Creator...
the bridging of
 masculine and feminine,
 life and death.
It's redemption.... nothing else matters."
-- Martha Cooley in The Archivist (1998)

The central aim of Western philosophy–

 Dualities of Pythagoras
 as reconstructed by Aristotle:
  Limited Unlimited
  Odd Even
  Male Female
  Light Dark
  Straight Curved
  ... and so on ....

"Of these dualities, the first is the most important; all the others may be seen as different aspects of this fundamental dichotomy. To establish a rational and consistent relationship between the limited [man, etc.] and the unlimited [the cosmos, etc.] is… the central aim of all Western philosophy."

— Jamie James in The Music of the Spheres (1993)

"In the garden of Adding
live Even and Odd…
And the song of love's recision
is the music of the spheres."

— The Midrash Jazz Quartet in City of God, by E. L. Doctorow (2000)

A quotation today at art critic Carol Kino's website, slightly expanded:

"Art inherited from the old religion
the power of consecrating things
and endowing them with
a sort of eternity;
museums are our temples,
and the objects displayed in them
are beyond history."

— Octavio Paz,"Seeing and Using: Art and Craftsmanship," in Convergences: Essays on Art and Literature (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich 1987), 52 

From Brian O'Doherty's 1976 Artforum essays– not on museums, but rather on gallery space:

"Inside the White Cube"

"We have now reached
a point where we see
not the art but the space first….
An image comes to mind
of a white, ideal space
that, more than any single picture,
may be the archetypal image
of 20th-century art."

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090205-cube2x2x2.gif

"Space: what you
damn well have to see."

— James Joyce, Ulysses  

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