Log24

Sunday, July 12, 2015

Characteristica Universalis

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:00 PM

From Wikipedia —

"Many Leibniz scholars… seem to agree that he intended
his characteristica universalis  … to be a form of … 
ideographic language. This was to be based on a
rationalised version of the 'principles' of Chinese characters…."

See as well O Nine,  Chinese Calligraphy, and Holy Field.

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

The Good Earth

Filed under: General — m759 @ 2:00 PM

In Beijing, it is now 3 AM on March 6,
the dies natalis  of St. Pearl Buck.

(Click to enlarge.)

IMAGE- Chiang Yee on the ninefold square and Chinese calligraphy

Wednesday, January 5, 2011

True Grid Example

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:00 PM

See today's earlier posts Ode and True Grid (continued) and, in the latter's
context of tic-tac-toe war games —  Balance, from Halloween 2005 —

IMAGE- The ninefold square

“An asymmetrical balance is sought since it possesses more movement.
This is achieved by the imaginary plotting of the character
upon a nine-fold square, invented by some ingenious writer of the Tang dynasty.
If the square were divided in half or in four, the result would be symmetrical,
but the nine-fold square permits balanced asymmetry."

Paraphrase of a passage in Chiang Yee's Chinese Calligraphy

Thursday, February 19, 2009

Thursday February 19, 2009

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 7:07 AM

A Sunrise
for Sunrise

“If we open any tract– Plastic Art and Pure Plastic Art or The Non-Objective World, for instance– we will find that Mondrian and Malevich are not discussing canvas or pigment or graphite or any other form of matter. They are talking about Being or Mind or Spirit.  From their point of view, the grid is a staircase to the Universal, and they are not interested in what happens below in the Concrete.”

Rosalind Krauss, “Grids”

Yesterday’s entry featured a rather simple-minded example from Krauss of how the ninefold square (said to be a symbol of Apollo)

The 3x3 grid

may be used to create a graphic design– a Greek cross, which appears also in crossword puzzles:

Crossword-puzzle design that includes Greek-cross elements

Illustration by
Paul Rand
(born Peretz Rosenbaum)

A more sophisticated example
of the ninefold square
in graphic design:

“That old Jew
gave me this here.”

— A Flag for Sunrise  

The 3x3 grid as an organizing frame for Chinese calligraphy. Example-- the character for 'sunrise'
From Paul-Rand.com

Monday, October 31, 2005

Monday October 31, 2005

Filed under: General — Tags: , , , — m759 @ 2:00 AM

Balance

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“An asymmetrical balance is sought since it possesses more movement. This is achieved by the imaginary plotting of the character upon a nine-fold square, invented by some ingenious writer of the Tang dynasty. If the square were divided in half or in four, the result would be symmetrical, but the nine-fold square permits balanced asymmetry.”– Chiang Yee, Chinese Calligraphy,
quoted in Aspen no. 10, item 8“‘Burnt Norton’ opens as a meditation on time. Many comparable and contrasting views are introduced. The lines are drenched with reminiscences of Heraclitus’ fragments on flux and movement….  the chief contrast around which Eliot constructs this poem is that between the view of time as a mere continuum, and the difficult paradoxical Christian view of how man lives both ‘in and out of time,’ how he is immersed in the flux and yet can penetrate to the eternal by apprehending timeless existence within time and above it. But even for the Christian the moments of release from the pressures of the flux are rare, though they alone redeem the sad wastage of otherwise unillumined existence. Eliot recalls one such moment of peculiar poignance, a childhood moment in the rose-garden– a symbol he has previously used, in many variants, for the birth of desire. Its implications are intricate and even ambiguous, since they raise the whole problem of how to discriminate between supernatural vision and mere illusion. Other variations here on the theme of how time is conquered are more directly apprehensible. In dwelling on the extension of time into movement, Eliot takes up an image he had used in ‘Triumphal March’: ‘at the still point of the turning world.’ This notion of ‘a mathematically pure point’ (as Philip Wheelwright has called it) seems to be Eliot’s poetic equivalent in our cosmology for Dante’s ‘unmoved Mover,’ another way of symbolising a timeless release from the ‘outer compulsions’ of the world. Still another variation is the passage on the Chinese jar in the final section. Here Eliot, in a conception comparable to Wallace Stevens’ ‘Anecdote of the Jar,’ has suggested how art conquers time:

       Only by the form, the pattern,
Can words or music reach
The stillness, as a Chinese jar still
Moves perpetually in its stillness.”

— F. O. Matthiessen,
The Achievement of T.S. Eliot,
Oxford University Press, 1958,
as quoted in On “Burnt Norton”

Thursday, May 15, 2003

Thursday May 15, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Well Done

“So tell me about the matrix reloaded… and what it’s like to finish a job well done.”

— Weblog entry by Harvard student, May 15, 2003

The matrix reloaded: 

See chapter VII, “Composition,” in Chinese Calligraphy: An Introduction to Its Aesthetic and Technique, by Chiang Yee, Harvard University Press, first published April 21st, 1938.

A job well done:

“The Best is Yet to Come”
— Epitaph of Francis Albert Sinatra

Friday, March 11, 2005

Friday March 11, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:28 AM

To a Young Scholar

truth is truth, tautalogous and true; what beauty is, that’s the thing to know

Posted 11/16/2002 at 1:51 am by TheYoungScholar

To a young scholar:
Guqin
Go
Calligraphy
Painting

Posted 11/16/2002 at 8:16 am by m759

For truth and beauty combined, see
The Eight, an entry of 4/4/2003,
to which the following sketch refers.

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