Log24

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

The Finkelstein Talisman

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 8:38 PM

An image in memory of a publisher* who reportedly died
on Saturday, August 26, 2017.  

He and his wife wrote a novel, The Twelve , that has been compared to
the classic film "Village of the Damned." (See a sequel in this journal.)

Magic cube and corresponding hexagram, or Star of David, with faces mapped to lines and edges mapped to points

For more on the image, see posts now tagged The Finkelstein Talisman.

*
 

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Backstory

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 12:06 AM

Click here to enlarge.  Click the image for the source page.

The "this page" reference is to …

Finite Geometry of the Square and Cube.

Also from March 14, 2017 —

Related material

'Children of the Central Structure,' adapted from 'Children of the Damned'

Sunday, June 26, 2016

Common Core versus Central Structure

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — m759 @ 2:56 PM

Rubik's Cube Core Assembly — Swarthmore Cube Project, 2008 —

"Children of the Common Core" —

There is also a central structure within Solomon's  Cube

'Children of the Central Structure,' adapted from 'Children of the Damned'

For a more elaborate entertainment along these lines, see the recent film

"Midnight Special" —

Friday, June 12, 2015

Core

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:00 AM
 
Grindhouse Madonna ,
 
Children at your feet.

Saturday, July 5, 2014

Core Curriculum Vocabulary:

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 5:01 PM

Separatrix  and  Mulligan

An image from this journal on September 16, 2013:

Carey Mulligan as a separatrix

IMAGE- Kipnis on Derrida's 'separatrix'

Mulligan:

“A mulligan, in a game, happens when a player gets a second chance
to perform a certain move or action.” — Wikipedia

New York Times  obituary for Richard Mellon Scaife:

“He had the caricatured look of a jovial billionaire promoting ‘family values’
in America: a real-life Citizen Kane with red cheeks, white hair, blue eyes and
a wide smile for the cameras. Friends called him intuitive but not intellectual.
He told Vanity Fair  his favorite TV show was ‘The Simpsons,’ and his favorite
book was John O’Hara’s  Appointment in Samarra , about a rich young
Pennsylvanian bent on self-destruction.” — Robert D. McFadden

Click image below for some nuclear family values in memory of Scaife:

See also the previous post,
Core Curriculum.

Core Curriculum

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 2:01 PM

This post was suggested by reviews of the David Hare play “Skylight” at
The New York Times , at WorldSocialism.org, and at ChicagoCritic.com.

 Vide  Atoms in the Family , by Laura Fermi, a book I read in high school.

Thursday, May 27, 2010

A Gathering for Gardner

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 6:00 AM

"You ain't been blue; no, no, no.
 You ain't been blue,
 Till you've had that mood indigo."
 — Song lyrics, authorship disputed

 

Indigo (web color) (#4B0082)

"Pigment indigo (web color indigo) represents
 the way the color indigo was always reproduced
 in pigments, paints, or colored pencils in the 1950s."

Related mythology:

Indigo Children and the classic
1964 film Children of the Damned

Image-- Children of the Damned take sanctuary in St. Dunstan's Church.

Related non-mythology:

Colored pencils

Image-- Diamond-shaped face of Durer's 'Melencolia I' solid, with four colored pencils from Diane Robertson Design

Monday, February 23, 2009

Monday February 23, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 2:22 PM
Another Manic Monday
McGee and Smee 

Project MUSE —

and interpretations, “any of the
Zingari shoolerim [gypsy schoolchildren]
may pick a peck of kindlings yet from the
sack of auld hensyne” (FW 112.4-8).

— Patrick McGee, “Reading Authority:
Feminism and Joyce,” MFS: Modern
Fiction Studies
— Volume 35, Number 3,
Fall 1989, pp. 421-436, The Johns Hopkins
University Press

McGee Thanks the Academy:

“The ulterior motive behind this essay [“Reading Authority,” above], the purpose for which I seize this occasion, concerns the question or problem of authority. I stress at the outset my understanding of authority as the constructed repository of value or foundation of a system of values, the final effect of fetishism– in this case, literary fetishism. [Cf. Marx, Das Kapital] Reading– as in the phrase ‘reading authority’– should be grasped as the institutionally determined act of constructing authority….”

Wikipedia:

“[In Peter Pan] Smee is Captain Hook’s right-hand man… Barrie describes him as ‘Irish’ and ‘a man who stabbed without offence‘….”

Background: In yesterday’s morning entry, James Joyce as Jesuit, with “Dagger Definitions.”

A different Smee appears as an art critic in yesterday’s afternoon entry “Design Theory.”–

Smee Stabs Without Offence:

“Brock, who has a brisk mind, is a man on a mission. He read mathematical economics and political philosophy at Princeton (he has five degrees in all) and is the founder and president of Strategic Economic Decisions Inc., a think tank specializing in applying the economics of uncertainty to forecasting and risk assessment.

But phooey to all that; Brock has deeper things to think about. He believes he has cracked the secret of beautiful design. He even has equations and graphs to prove it.”

A Jesuit in Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man:

“When may we expect to have something from you on the esthetic question?”

Beckett Bethicketted:

“Our entanglement in the wilderness of Finnegans Wake is exemplified by the neologism ‘Bethicket.’ This word condenses a range of possible meanings and reinforces a diversity of possible syntactic interpretations. Joyce seems to allude to Beckett, creating a portmanteau word that melds ‘Beckett’ with ‘thicket’ (continuing the undergrowth metaphor), ‘thick’ (adding mental density to floral density)…. As a single word ‘Bethicket’ contains the confusion that its context suggests. On the one hand, ‘Bethicket me for a stump of a beech’ has the sound of a proverbial expletive that might mean something like ‘I’ll be damned’ or ‘Well, I’ll be a son of a gun.’….”

Stephen Dilks

Winslet, Penn, and Cruz at the Oscars, 2009

At the Oscars, 2009

Related material:

Frame Tales and Dickung

Friday, December 30, 2005

Friday December 30, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 10:10 PM
Rhapsody in Indigo
or:
We are stardust,
We are golden,
continued

1971:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051230-Blue.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Joni Mitchell, Blue

1994:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051230-Indigo.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Joni Mitchell, Turbulent Indigo

"Some call them
'Emissaries from Heaven,'
others say the 'New Kids'
or even the
'Children of the New Earth.'
They are best known as
 the Indigo Children…."

Brood Indigo  

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051230-Children1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Children of the Damned (1963)

(Set at
 St. Dunstan-in-the-East Church,
London)

Related material:
Shining Through
on
May 19, 2005,
 St. Dunstan's Day–

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050519-Anakin.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

This was the opening date for
 the final episode of Star Wars.

Friday, November 29, 2002

Friday November 29, 2002

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 1:06 PM

A Logocentric Archetype

Today we examine the relativist, nominalist, leftist, nihilist, despairing, depressing, absurd, and abominable work of Samuel Beckett, darling of the postmodernists.

One lens through which to view Beckett is an essay by Jennifer Martin, "Beckettian Drama as Protest: A Postmodern Examination of the 'Delogocentering' of Language." Martin begins her essay with two quotations: one from the contemptible French twerp Jacques Derrida, and one from Beckett's masterpiece of stupidity, Molloy. For a logocentric deconstruction of Derrida, see my note, "The Shining of May 29," which demonstrates how Derrida attempts to convert a rather important mathematical result to his brand of nauseating and pretentious nonsense, and of course gets it wrong. For a logocentric deconstruction of Molloy, consider the following passage:

"I took advantage of being at the seaside to lay in a store of sucking-stones. They were pebbles but I call them stones…. I distributed them equally among my four pockets, and sucked them turn and turn about. This raised a problem which I first solved in the following way. I had say sixteen stones, four in each of my four pockets these being the two pockets of my trousers and the two pockets of my greatcoat. Taking a stone from the right pocket of my greatcoat, and putting it in my mouth, I replaced it in the right pocket of my greatcoat by a stone from the right pocket of my trousers, which I replaced by a stone from the left pocket of my trousers, which I replaced by a stone from the left pocket of my greatcoat, which I replaced by the stone which was in my mouth, as soon as I had finished sucking it. Thus there were still four stones in each of my four pockets, but not quite the same stones….But this solution did not satisfy me fully. For it did not escape me that, by an extraordinary hazard, the four stones circulating thus might always be the same four."

Beckett is describing, in great detail, how a damned moron might approach the extraordinarily beautiful mathematical discipline known as group theory, founded by the French anticleric and leftist Evariste Galois. Disciples of Derrida may play at mimicking the politics of Galois, but will never come close to imitating his genius. For a worthwhile discussion of permutation groups acting on a set of 16 elements, see R. D. Carmichael's masterly work, Introduction to the Theory of Groups of Finite Order, Ginn, Boston, 1937, reprinted by Dover, New York, 1956.

There are at least two ways of approaching permutations on 16 elements in what Pascal calls "l'esprit géométrique." My website Diamond Theory discusses the action of the affine group in a four-dimensional finite geometry of 16 points. For a four-dimensional euclidean hypercube, or tesseract, with 16 vertices, see the highly logocentric movable illustration by Harry J. Smith. The concept of a tesseract was made famous, though seen through a glass darkly, by the Christian writer Madeleine L'Engle in her novel for children and young adults, A Wrinkle in Tme.

This tesseract may serve as an archetype for what Pascal, Simone Weil (see my earlier notes), Harry J. Smith, and Madeleine L'Engle might, borrowing their enemies' language, call their "logocentric" philosophy.

For a more literary antidote to postmodernist nihilism, see Archetypal Theory and Criticism, by Glen R. Gill.

For a discussion of the full range of meaning of the word "logos," which has rational as well as religious connotations, click here.

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