Log24

Friday, March 10, 2017

The Transformers

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 10:00 PM

"The transformed urban interior is the spatial organisation of
an achiever, one who has crossed the class divide and who uses
space to express his membership of, not aspirations towards, 
an ascendant class in our society: the class of those people who 
earn their living by transformation— as opposed to the mere
reproduction— of symbols, such as writers, designers, and
academics"

The Social Logic of Space ,
     by Bill Hillier and Julienne Hanson,
     Cambridge University Press, 1984

For another perspective on the achievers, see The Deceivers .

Related material —

Exhibit A:

Exhibit B:

Edwin Schlossberg, 'Still Changes Through Structure' text piece

Exhibit C:

Thursday, April 21, 2016

The Alchemist’s Chessboard

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 12:25 PM

Material related to the previous post and to Alfred Bester's
1981 followup to The Stars My Destination  titled The Deceivers

The Lapis Philosophorum :

"The lapis  was thought of as a unity and therefore often stands for the prima materia  in general."
— Aion , by C. G. Jung

"Its discoverer was of the opinion that he had produced the equivalent of the primordial protomatter which exploded into the Universe."
— The Stars My Destination , by Alfred Bester

And from Bester's The Deceivers :

Meta  Physics

"'… Think of a match.  You've got a chemical head of potash, antimony, and stuff, full of energy waiting to be released.  Friction does it.  But when Meta  excites and releases energy, it's like a stick of dynamite compared to a match.  It's the chess legend for real.'

'I don't know it.'

'Oh, the story goes that a philosopher invented chess for the amusement of an Indian rajah.  The king was so delighted that he told the inventor to name his reward and he'd get it, no matter what.  The philosopher asked that one grain of rice be placed on the first square of the chessboard, two on the second, four on the third, and so on to the sixty-fourth.'

'That doesn't sound like much.'"

Related material :

Geometry of the I Ching

Thursday, February 13, 2014

Winter’s Game*

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Part I:  Continued from January 20 — "Arising Heaven" —

Part II:  The Stars My Destination  in this journal

'The Stars My Destination,' current edition (with cover slightly changed)

Part III:  Ender's Game  —

* The title refers to a character, Rogue Winter, in Alfred Bester's
  1981 novel The Deceivers .

Saturday, February 8, 2014

The Village

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:26 PM

From this journal on Jan. 26, 2009 —

http://www.log24.com/log/pix09/090126-Map.jpg

See also "Strip Mathematics," by Zoltan Dienes —

This illustration may have first appeared in Dienes's

"Mathematical fun without numbers, letters,
formulae or equations, Part I,"
The New Zealand Mathematics Magazine,
Vol 39, no.1. (May 2002)*

Material related to New Zealand —

See January 29, 2003 in this journal.

Material related to mathematics (without "fun") —

The Representation of Minus One.

General context —

Bester's The Deceivers  in this journal.

* Update of 5:48 PM ET Feb. 8, 2014 — From that publication —  

   "Nowhere will I give away how I stole these patterns
    from the mathematician's secret closet." — Zoltan Dienes

Saturday, October 5, 2013

Dream Girls

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Her —

"Please wait as your operating system is initiated."

See also  the Oct. 13, 2011, post
        "Now, Here's My Plan"
  and Bester's The Deceivers —

His excitement drove him into the workshop to get a better view of the end product on the giant prime video of his computer. During those few moments the development had accelerated into its dénouement, for he arrived just in time to have the huge screen explode into his face. Demi Jeroux burst out of the computer in a shower of plastic particles, rolled and sprawled on top of him. She was naked, sweating, trembling.

“Golly!” she gasped. “Getting in was easy compared to getting out. Are you hurt, darling?”

“I’m fine. I’m great. I’m ennobled. I’m stupefied. Hi, hey. Hi, my love. Hi, my darling sprite. What’s a nice girl like you doing in a place like that?”

Sunday, May 19, 2013

Sermon

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 11:00 AM

Best vs. Bester

The previous post ended with a reference mentioning Rosenhain.

For a recent application of Rosenhain's work, see
Desargues via Rosenhain (April 1, 2013).

From the next day, April 2, 2013:

"The proof of Desargues' theorem of projective geometry
comes as close as a proof can to the Zen ideal.
It can be summarized in two words: 'I see!' "

– Gian-Carlo Rota in Indiscrete Thoughts (1997)

Also in that book, originally from a review in Advances in Mathematics ,
Vol. 84, Number 1, Nov. 1990, p. 136:
IMAGE- Rota's review of 'Sphere Packings, Lattices and Groups'-- in a word, 'best'

See, too, in the Conway-Sloane book, the Galois tesseract  
and, in this journal, Geometry for Jews and The Deceivers , by Bester.

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Synergy*

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 6:48 AM

(Continued from 24 hours ago)

Saturday evening NY lottery: 302 and 0181.

For 302, see OCODE. For 0181, see the bridge
between page 180 and page 181 in
Disjunctive Poetics  by Peter Quartermain
(Cambridge University Press, 1992).

* For some narrative related to the title,
   see The Deceivers  by Alfred Bester.

Friday, October 14, 2011

Plan 9 (continued)

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:00 PM

"All this he knew, but what he didn’t know was that he resonated to the Anima Mundi which produced his extraordinary synergic pattern sense… what I call a 'Phane Sense,' from the Greek phainein  meaning to show . It was this phane sense that enabled him to be shown things from apparently unrelated facts and events and synergize them into a whole."

— Alfred Bester, The Deceivers

Click to enlarge

http://www.log24.com/log/pix11C/111014-Phanein-500w.jpg

The Tiffany Epiphany — from Elizabeth Osborne's
 Vocabulary from Latin and Greek Roots IV

Thursday, August 20, 2009

Thursday August 20, 2009

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:00 PM

Sophists

From David Lavery’s weblog today

Kierkegaard on Sophists:

“If the natural sciences had been developed in Socrates’ day as they are now, all the sophists would have been scientists. One would have hung a microscope outside his shop in order to attract customers, and then would have had a sign painted saying: Learn and see through a giant microscope how a man thinks (and on reading the advertisement Socrates would have said: that is how men who do not think behave).”

— Søren Kierkegaard, Journals, edited and translated by Alexander Dru

To anyone familiar with Pirsig’s classic Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, the above remarks of Kierkegaard ring false. Actually, the sophists as described by Pirsig are not at all like scientists, but rather like relativist purveyors of postmodern literary “theory.” According to Pirsig, the scientists are like Plato (and hence Socrates)– defenders of objective truth.

Pirsig on Sophists:

“The pre-Socratic philosophers mentioned so far all sought to establish a universal Immortal Principle in the external world they found around them. Their common effort united them into a group that may be called Cosmologists. They all agreed that such a principle existed but their disagreements as to what it was seemed irresolvable. The followers of Heraclitus insisted the Immortal Principle was change and motion. But Parmenides’ disciple, Zeno, proved through a series of paradoxes that any perception of motion and change is illusory. Reality had to be motionless.

The resolution of the arguments of the Cosmologists came from a new direction entirely, from a group Phædrus seemed to feel were early humanists. They were teachers, but what they sought to teach was not principles, but beliefs of men. Their object was not any single absolute truth, but the improvement of men. All principles, all truths, are relative, they said. ‘Man is the measure of all things.’ These were the famous teachers of ‘wisdom,’ the Sophists of ancient Greece.

To Phaedrus, this backlight from the conflict between the Sophists and the Cosmologists adds an entirely new dimension to the Dialogues of Plato. Socrates is not just expounding noble ideas in a vacuum. He is in the middle of a war between those who think truth is absolute and those who think truth is relative. He is fighting that war with everything he has. The Sophists are the enemy.

Now Plato’s hatred of the Sophists makes sense. He and Socrates are defending the Immortal Principle of the Cosmologists against what they consider to be the decadence of the Sophists. Truth. Knowledge. That which is independent of what anyone thinks about it. The ideal that Socrates died for. The ideal that Greece alone possesses for the first time in the history of the world. It is still a very fragile thing. It can disappear completely. Plato abhors and damns the Sophists without restraint, not because they are low and immoral people… there are obviously much lower and more immoral people in Greece he completely ignores. He damns them because they threaten mankind’s first beginning grasp of the idea of truth. That’s what it is all about.

The results of Socrates’ martyrdom and Plato’s unexcelled prose that followed are nothing less than the whole world of Western man as we know it. If the idea of truth had been allowed to perish unrediscovered by the Renaissance it’s unlikely that we would be much beyond the level of prehistoric man today. The ideas of science and technology and other systematically organized efforts of man are dead-centered on it. It is the nucleus of it all.

And yet, Phaedrus understands, what he is saying about Quality is somehow opposed to all this. It seems to agree much more closely with the Sophists.”

I agree with Plato’s (and Rebecca Goldstein’s) contempt for relativists. Yet Pirsig makes a very important point. It is not the scientists but rather the storytellers (not, mind you, the literary theorists) who sometimes seem to embody Quality.

As for hanging a sign outside the shop, I suggest (particularly to New Zealand’s Cullinane College) that either or both of the following pictures would be more suggestive of Quality than a microscope:

Alfred Bester covers showing 'primordial protomatter' (altered here) from 'Stars' and Rogue Winter from 'Deceivers'

For the “primordial protomatter”
in the picture at left, see
The Diamond Archetype.

Wednesday, June 6, 2007

Wednesday June 6, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 11:07 AM
It is now 3:07 AM
June 7 in New Zealand.
Today at Cullinane College:

Examination Day

IMAGE- Rogue Winter with spear, Jupiter in background, on cover of 'The Deceivers,' a novel by Alfred Bester.

(For the college curriculum,
see the New Zealand
Qualifications Authority.)

If Cullinane College were Hogwarts–

Last-minute exam info:

The Lapis Philosophorum

"The lapis was thought of as a unity and therefore often stands for the prima materia in general."
Aion, by C. G. Jung

"Its discoverer was of the opinion that he had produced the equivalent of the primordial protomatter which exploded into the Universe."
The Stars My Destination, by Alfred Bester

And from Bester's The Deceivers:

Meta Physics

"'… Think of a match.  You've got a chemical head of potash, antimony, and stuff, full of energy waiting to be released.  Friction does it.  But when Meta excites and releases energy, it's like a stick of dynamite compared to a match.  It's the chess legend for real.'

'I don't know it.'

'Oh, the story goes that a philosopher invented chess for the amusement of an Indian rajah.  The king was so delighted that he told the inventor to name his reward and he'd get it, no matter what.  The philosopher asked that one grain of rice be placed on the first square of the chessboard, two on the second, four on the third, and so on to the sixty-fourth.'

'That doesn't sound like much.'

'So the rajah said. …'"

Related material:

Geometry of the I Ching
 

Saturday, February 3, 2007

Saturday February 3, 2007

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:00 PM
The church bells
all were broken.

— Don McLean 


“Emergentism claims that a whole is ‘something more than the sum of its parts,’ or has properties that cannot be understood in terms of the properties of the parts.”

— Michael Silberstein, “Reduction, Emergence and Explanation” (pdf), Chapter Five in The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science

“The whole is greater than the sum of its parts, no matter what you name it.”

— Alfred Bester, Chapter Eight, “The Search,” in The Deceivers

Sunday, October 2, 2005

Sunday October 2, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 1:06 PM

Happy Birthday, Wallace Stevens

Readings for today:

At the Wallace Stevens online concordance, search for X and for primitive.

In the e-book edition of Bester’s  The Deceivers,  search for X.

    “We seek
Nothing beyond reality. Within it,

Everything, the spirit’s alchemicana
Included, the spirit that goes roundabout
And through included, not merely the visible,

The solid, but the movable, the moment,
The coming on of feasts and the habits of saints,
The pattern of the heavens and high, night air.”

Wallace Stevens,
Oct. 2, 1879 – Aug. 2, 1955,
“An Ordinary Evening in New Haven”
IX.1-18, from The Auroras of Autumn,
Knopf, NY (1950)

Related material:

(Added Monday, Oct. 3, 8:45 AM)

“What if Shakespeare had been born in Teaneck, N.J., in 1973?

He would call himself Spear Daddy. His rap would exhibit a profound, nuanced understanding of the frailty of the human condition, exploring the personality in all its bewildering complexity: pretension, pride, vulnerability, emotional treachery, as well as the enduring triumph of love.

Spear Daddy would disappear from the charts in about six weeks.”

Gene Weingarten in the Washington Post,
    Sunday, Oct. 2, 2005

Presenting…

Spear Daddy!

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051003-Deceivers1.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Continuing Bester’s Maori theme,
students from Cullinane College:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051003-Enlarge.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05B/051003-CC2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

(See Literature and Geography.)

Monday, May 23, 2005

Monday May 23, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: — m759 @ 1:00 PM
Elementary Art

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050523-Dorazio3.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Piero Dorazio, 1982

From the J. Paul Getty Trust:

"I've recently had it brought to my attention that the current accepted primary colors are magenta, cyan, and yellow. I teach elementary art and I'm wondering if I really need to point out that fact or if I should continue referring to the primary colors the way I always have — red, yellow, and blue! Anyone have an opinion?"

Color vs. Pigment
("CMYK" at Whatis.com):

"There is a fundamental difference between color and pigment. Color represents energy radiated…. Pigments, as opposed to colors, represent energy that is not absorbed…."

Illustrations from
Color Box Applet:

 
The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050523-Mixing.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
 
Another good background page
for elementary color education:

Colored Shadow Explorations.

A good starting point for
non-elementary education:

The "Color" category in Wikipedia.

Further background:

From "The Relations between
Poetry and Painting," by Wallace Stevens:

"The theory of poetry, that is to say, the total of the theories of poetry, often seems to become in time a mystical theology or, more simply, a mystique. The reason for this must by now be clear. The reason is the same reason why the pictures in a museum of modern art often seem to become in time a mystical aesthetic, a prodigious search of appearance, as if to find a way of saying and of establishing that all things, whether below or above appearance, are one and that it is only through reality, in which they are reflected or, it may be, joined together, that we can reach them. Under such stress, reality changes from substance to subtlety, a subtlety in which it was natural for Cézanne to say: 'I see planes bestriding each other and sometimes straight lines seem to me to fall' or 'Planes in color. . . . The colored area where shimmer the souls of the planes, in the blaze of the kindled prism, the meeting of planes in the sunlight.' The conversion of our Lumpenwelt went far beyond this. It was from the point of view of another subtlety that Klee could write: 'But he is one chosen that today comes near to the secret places where original law fosters all evolution. And what artist would not establish himself there where the organic center of all movement in time and space—which he calls the mind or heart of creation— determines every function.' Conceding that this sounds a bit like sacerdotal jargon, that is not too much to allow to those that have helped to create a new reality, a modern reality, since what has been created is nothing less."

From Bester's The Deceivers (1981):

He stripped, went to his Japanese bed in the monk's cell, thrashed, swore, and slept at last, dreaming

crazed p a t t e r n s
           a t t e r n s
           t t e r n s
           t e r n s
           e r n s
           r n s
           n s
           s

Wednesday, May 11, 2005

Wednesday May 11, 2005

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 7:11 PM
Goodbye Girl

  From a goodbye letter
by a girl named
  Lucero in Cuernavaca
  in the early 1960’s:

Si me de veras quieres,
deja me en paz
.”

(See Shining Forth.)

Today’s birthdays —
   Natasha Richardson,
   Martha Quinn,         
   Frances Fisher —     
 remind me of        

 

The Sprite and the Synergist
chapter in Bester’s The Deceivers:

Three drinks later he was suddenly inspired.  “What I need right now is a girl to lose myself in.  That’s the only way to wait for a pattern to show.”

One of his reciprocal Rogues (he had a dozen alternate selves) answered, “Feel free, but you left your big red book in the workshop.”

“Why, for jigjeeze sake, can’t I have the little black book, famed in song and story?”

“Why can’t you remember a phone number?  Never mind.  Shall we join the ladies?”

He made three calls, all negative.  He had three more drinks, all positive.  He stripped, went to his Japanese bed in the monk’s cell, thrashed, swore, and slept at last, dreaming

crazed p a t t e r n s
           a t t e r n s
           t t e r n s
           t e r n s
           e r n s
           r n s
           n s
           s

“Whenever I want you,
all I have to do is…”

Deja me en paz…

Related material:

Octavio Paz

Saturday, July 10, 2004

Saturday July 10, 2004

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 3:17 PM
Oxford Word

From today’s obituary in The New York Times of R. W. Burchfield, editor of A Supplement to the Oxford English Dictionary:

“Robert William Burchfield was born Jan. 27, 1923, in Wanganui, New Zealand. In 1949, after earning an undergraduate degree at Victoria University College in Wellington, he accepted a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford.

There, he read Medieval English literature with C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien.”

For more on literature and Wanganui, see my entry of Jan. 19. 2003, from which the following is taken.

Literature
and
Geography

“Literature begins
with geography.”

Attributed to
Robert Frost

The Maori Court at
the Wanganui Museum

Cullinane College is a Catholic co-educational college, set to open in Wanganui (New Zealand) on the 29th of January, 2003.”

The 29th of January will be the 40th anniversary of the death of Saint Robert Frost.

New Zealand, perhaps the most beautiful country on the planet, is noted for being the setting of the film version of Lord of the Rings, which was written by a devout Catholic, J. R. R. Tolkien.

For other New Zealand themes, see Alfred Bester’s novels The Stars My Destination and The Deceivers.

The original title of The Stars My Destination was Tyger! Tyger! after Blake’s poem. 

For more on fearful symmetry, see the work of Marston Conder, professor of mathematics at the University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Sunday, January 19, 2003

Sunday January 19, 2003

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 4:30 PM

Literature
and
Geography

“Literature begins
with geography.”

 Attributed to
Robert Frost

The Maori Court at
the Wanganui Museum

Cullinane College is a Catholic co-educational college, set to open in Wanganui (New Zealand) on the 29th of January, 2003.”

The 29th of January will be the 40th anniversary of the death of Saint Robert Frost.

New Zealand, perhaps the most beautiful country on the planet, is noted for being the setting of the film version of Lord of the Rings, which was written by a devout Catholic, J. R. R. Tolkien. 

Here is a rather Catholic meditation on life and death in Tolkien’s work:

Frodo: “…He deserves death.”

Gandalf: “Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement.”

Personally, I prefer Clint Eastwood’s version of this dialogue:

The Schofield Kid: “Well, I guess they had it coming.”

William Munny: “We all have it coming, Kid.”

For other New Zealand themes, see Alfred Bester’s novels The Stars My Destination and The Deceivers.

The original title of The Stars My Destination was Tyger! Tyger! after Blake’s poem. 

For more on fearful symmetry, see the work of Marston Conder, professor of mathematics at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. 

 

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