Log24

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Tuesday March 25, 2008

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 9:00 AM
Dancers and
the Dance

The previous entry was inspired (see the "In the Details" link) by the philosophical musings of Julie Taymor… specifically, her recollection of Balinese dancers–

"… they were performing for God. Now God can mean whatever you want it to mean. But for me, I understood it so totally. The detail….

They did it from the inside to the outside. And from the outside to the in. And that profoundly moved me then. It was… it was the most important thing that I ever experienced."

— Julie Taymor,
"Skewed Mirrors" interview

Here is some further commentary on the words of that entry–

On the phrase "Within You Without You"– the title of a song by George Harrison:

"Bernard’s understanding of reality connects to this idea of 'flow': he sees reality as a product of consciousness. He rejects the idea of an 'outer' world of unchanging objects and an 'inner' world of the mind and ideas. Rather, our minds are part of the world, and vice versa."

— Adrien Ardoin, SparkNote on
    Virginia Woolf's The Waves

On "Death and the Apple Tree"– the title of the previous entry— in The Waves:

"The apple tree Neville is looking at as he overhears the servants at the school discussing a local murder becomes inextricably linked to his knowledge of death. Neville finds himself unable to pass the tree, seeing it as glimmering and lovely, yet sinister and 'implacable.' When he learns that Percival is dead, he feels he is face to face once again with 'the tree which I cannot pass.' Eventually, Neville turns away from the natural world to art, which exists outside of time and can therefore transcend death. The fruit of the tree appears only in Neville’s room on his embroidered curtain, a symbol itself of nature turned into artifice. The apple tree image also echoes the apple tree from the Book of Genesis in the Bible, the fruit of which led Adam and Eve to knowledge and, therefore, expulsion from Eden."

— Adrien Ardoin, op. cit.

Friday, June 15, 2007

Friday June 15, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:31 PM
Geometry and Death

(continued from Dec. 11, 2006):

J. G. Ballard on "the architecture of death":

"… a huge system of German fortifications that included the Siegfried line, submarine pens and huge flak towers that threatened the surrounding land like lines of Teutonic knights. Almost all had survived the war and seemed to be waiting for the next one, left behind by a race of warrior scientists obsessed with geometry and death."

The Guardian, March 20, 2006

From the previous entry, which provided a lesson in geometry related, if only by synchronicity, to the death of Jewish art theorist Rudolf Arnheim:

"We are going to keep doing this until we get it right."

Here is a lesson related, again by synchronicity, to the death of a Christian art scholar of "uncommon erudition, wit, and grace"– Robert R. Wark of the Huntington Library.  Wark died on June 8, a date I think of as the feast day of St. Gerard Manley Hopkins, a Jesuit priest-poet of the nineteenth century.

From a Log24 entry on the date of Wark's death–

Samuel Pepys on a musical performance (Diary, Feb. 27, 1668):

"When the Angel comes down"

"When the Angel Comes Down, and the Soul Departs," a webpage on dance in Bali:

"Dance is also a devotion to the Supreme Being."

Julie Taymor, interview:

"I went to Bali to a remote village by a volcanic mountain…."

The above three quotations were intended to supply some background for a link to an entry on Taymor, on what Taymor has called "skewed mirrors," and on a related mathematical concept named, using a term Hopkins coined, "inscapes."

They might form part of an introductory class in mathematics and art given, like the class of the previous entry, in Purgatory.

Wark, who is now, one imagines, in Paradise, needs no such class.  He nevertheless might enjoy listening in.

A guest teacher in
the purgatorial class
on mathematics
and art:

Olivier as Dr. Christian Szell

The icosahedron (a source of duads and synthemes)

"Is it safe?"

Sunday, January 7, 2007

Sunday January 7, 2007

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Thursday, April 7, 2005  7:26 PM

In the Details

Wallace Stevens,
An Ordinary Evening in New Haven:

XXII

Professor Eucalyptus said, “The search
For reality is as momentous as
The search for God.”  It is the philosopher’s search
For an interior made exterior
And the poet’s search for the same exterior made
Interior….

   … Likewise to say of the evening star,
The most ancient light in the most ancient sky,
That it is wholly an inner light, that it shines
From the sleepy bosom of the real, re-creates,
Searches a possible for its possibleness.

Julie Taymor, “Skewed Mirrors” interview:

“… they were performing for God. Now God can mean whatever you want it to mean. But for me, I understood it so totally. The detail….

They did it from the inside to the outside. And from the outside to the in. And that profoundly moved me then. It was…it was the most important thing that I ever experienced.”

Skewed Mirrors
illustrated:


Click on the above to enlarge.

Details:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050407-Messick2.png” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The above may be of interest to students
of  iconology — what Dan Brown in
The Da Vinci Code calls “symbology” —
and of redheads.

The artist of Details,
“Brenda Starr” creator
Dale Messick, died on Tuesday,
April 5, 2005, at 98.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050407-Messick.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
AP Photo
Dale Messick in 1982

For further details on
April 5, see
Art History:
The Pope of Hope

Wednesday, December 13, 2006

Wednesday December 13, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 9:29 AM

 Best Wishes for a
C. S. Lewis
Christmas

 

 C.S. Lewis

Image of Lewis from
Into the Wardrobe

What on earth
  is a concrete
  universal?”

— Robert M. Pirsig, author of Zen and the Art of Motorcyle Maintenance

For one approach to an answer, click on the picture at left.

Update of 4:23 PM:

The Lewis link above deals with the separation of Heaven from Hell.  The emphasis is on Heaven.  A mysterious visitor to this website, “United States,” seems to be seeking equal time for Hell.  And so…

Storyboard

Based on Xanga footprints of Dec. 13, 2006
from m759’s site-visitor “United States”
(possibly a robot; if so, a robot with strange tastes).

TIME OF     DATE OF             PAGE VISITED   
VISIT         PAGE VISITED 

1217 040520  Parable
1218 060606  The Omen
1220 051205  Don’t Know Much About History
1225 030822  Mr. Holland’s Week (And in Three Days…)
1233 030114  Remarks on Day 14 (What is Truth?)
1238 040818  Train of Thought (Oh, My Lolita)
1244 020929  Angel Night (Ellis Larkins)
1249 040715  Identity Crisis (Bourne and Treadstone)
1252 050322  Make a Differance (Lacan, Derrida, Reba)
1255 050221  Quarter to Three on Night of HST’s death
1256 040408  Triple Crown on Holy Thursday
1258 040714  Welcome to Mr. Motley’s Neighborhood
1258 030221  All About Lilith
0103 040808  Quartet (for Alexander Hammid)
0104 030106  Dead Poet in the City of Angels
0109 030914  Skewed Mirrors (Readings on Aesthetics)
0110 050126  A Theorem in Musical Form
0125 021007  Music for R. D. Laing
0138 020806  Butterflies & Popes (Transfiguration)
0140 060606  The Omen (again)
0156 030313  ART WARS: Perennial Tutti-Frutti
0202 030112  Ask Not (A Bee Gees Requiem)
0202 050527  Drama of the Diagonal, Part Deux
0202 060514  STAR WARS continued (Eclipse and Venus)
0207 030112  Ask Not (again… Victory of the Goddess)
0207 030221  All About Lilith (again… Roll credits.)

“How much story do you want?”
— George Balanchine
 

Saturday, December 9, 2006

Saturday December 9, 2006

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:00 AM
Death on the Feast
of Saint Nicholas

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06B/061209-Deathbed.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Quotation from Log24 on
September 14, 2003–

Skewed Mirrors:

Readings on Aesthetics for the
Feast of the Triumph of the Cross:

“We’re not here to stick a mirror on you. Anybody can do that, We’re here to give you a more cubist or skewed mirror, where you get to see yourself with fresh eyes. That’s what an artist does. When you paint the Crucifixion, you’re not painting an exact reproduction.”

Julie Taymor on “Frida” (AP, 10/22/02)

 

Saint Francis Borgia at the Deathbed of an Impenitent [above], painted by Francisco Goya (1746-1828) in 1788, is one of the most astonishing works in an oeuvre replete with remarkable images. In the decade and a half since its inclusion in Robert Rosenblum‘s survey* of nineteenth-century art, this canvas has become widely known among scholars and their students. Rosenblum, following a line of interpretation that dates back to the middle of the nineteenth century, uses this painting to support a symptomatic reading of Goya’s art, which he describes as ‘the most sharply accurate mirror of the collapse of the great religious and monarchic traditions of the West.'”

Andrew Schulz in The Art Bulletin, Dec. 1, 1998

* 19th-Century Art, by H. W. Janson and Robert Rosenblum, 1984

Rosenblum died at 79

on Wednesday,
the Feast of St. Nicholas.

For more on
St. Francis Borgia, see
In Lieu of Rosebud.

Friday, June 9, 2006

Friday June 9, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 8:00 AM

Ursprache Revisited

"Rilke's poems operate at this balancing point between openness and closure, between centripedal and centrifugal motion, the poem being all symbol and being all object.  Rilke developed the inwardness of poetry begun in Baudelaire and refined in Mallarmé into new depths of self-referentiality.  Verinnerlichung was the term for this transmutation from outer to inner…."

Rainer Maria Rilke: Life and Work,
    by Jeremy Robinson
 

For a symbol of
Verinnerlichung,
see a figure from
April 5, 2005:
 

(Skewed Mirrors
,
Sept. 14, 2003)

Related material: Herbert Silberer on Verinnerlichung in Problems of Mysticism and the Log24 entry Figures of Speech of 10 AM Wednesday, June 7– the date of death of theatrical agent Howard Rosenstone.  See also the work of playwrights Donald Margulies and William Finn, clients of Rosenstone.

For Margulies, see a review of "Brooklyn Boy"

"It's like stringing beads on a necklace. By the time the play ends, you have the whole necklace. But it's not like a typical play, where you know where you're going at the end of Act I. In this case, you'll learn something in one scene that will make you realize Eric was lying in a previous scene.  And the play is partly about the lies we tell each other, the lies we tell ourselves and the identity we project to other people." — Actor Robert Gomes

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060604-Roots.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 

For Finn, see
circle-in-the-square.com.
"Finn, again!"
— James Joyce  
 

Wednesday, June 7, 2006

Wednesday June 7, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 AM
Figures of Speech

Omen

(x)

in memory of
Arnold Newman,
dead on 6/6/6.
 

TIME magazine, issue dated June 12, 2006, item posted Sunday, June 4, 2006:

IF AT FIRST YOU DON'T SUCCEED …

By JULIE RAWE

"Nervous kids and obscure words are not the stuff of big-time TV, but this year's Scripps National Spelling Bee was an improbable nail-biter. One of the 13 finalists got reinstated after judges made a spelling error, a Canadian came in second–who knew foreign kids could compete?–and KATHARINE CLOSE, 13, prevailed in her fifth year. The eighth-grader from Spring Lake, N.J., won with ursprache. It means protolanguage. Now try to use it in conversation."

John T. Lysaker (pdf)
quoting Heidegger:
"Poetry is the
 originary language
    (Ursprache)…"

— Heidegger, Erlauterungen
zu Holderlins Dichtung
.
 Frankfurt am Main:
Klostermann, 1971: 41.

See also a figure from
D-Day morning,
6/6/6:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06A/060604-Roots.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

and a figure from
April 5, 2005:
 


(Skewed Mirrors
,
Sept. 14, 2003)

"Evil did not have
the last word."
Richard John Neuhaus,
April 4, 2005

"This is the exact opposite
of what echthroi do in
their X-ing or un-naming."
Wikipedia on
A Wind in the Door

"Lps. The keys to. Given!
 A way a lone a last
 a loved a long the
 PARIS,
 1922-1939"
 — James Joyce,
     Finnegans Wake


"There is never any ending
to Paris."
— Ernest Hemingway    

Wednesday, June 15, 2005

Wednesday June 15, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:44 AM

Cross-Referenced

From today’s New York Times,
a review of a Werner Herzog film,
“Wheel of Time,” that opens
today in Manhattan:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05A/050615-Mandala.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

From the June 13-14
midnight Log24 entry:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05A/050614-DarkCity.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

“With a little effort, anything can be
shown to connect with anything else:
existence is infinitely cross-referenced.”

— Opening sentence of
Martha Cooley’s The Archivist

These images suggest
a Google search on the phrase
crucified on the wheel of time,”

which yields the following.

Click to go to DARK CITYDARK CITY (1998)
Crucified on the Wheel Of Time.
A visual feast.

From Dark City: A Hollywood Jesus Movie Review

“There is something mesmerizing about this important film. It flows in the same vein as The Truman Show, The Game, and Pleasantville.  Something isn’t real with the world around John Murdoch. Some group is trying to control things and it isn’t God.”

Amen.

Related material:
Skewed Mirrors and
The Graces of Paranoia

Monday, June 6, 2005

Monday June 6, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 1:00 PM

Order and Disorder

From “Connoisseur of Chaos,”
by Wallace Stevens, in
Parts of a World, 1942:


I

A.  A violent order is a disorder; and
B.  A great disorder is an order.
    These Two things are one. (Pages of illustrations.)               

IV  

A.  Well, an old order is a violent one. This proves nothing.
    Just one more truth, one more
    Element in the immense disorder of truths.

B.  It is April as I write. The wind
    Is blowing after days of constant rain.
    All this, of course, will come to summer soon.
    But suppose the disorder of truths should ever come
    To an order, most Plantagenet, most fixed. . . .
    A great disorder is an order.
    Now, A And B are not like statuary, posed
    For a vista in the Louvre. They are things chalked
    On the sidewalk so that the pensive man may see.

V

    The pensive man . . . He sees that eagle float
    For which the intricate Alps are a single nest.

Related material:
“Derrida on Plato on writing says ‘In order for these contrary values (good/evil, true/false, essence/appearance, inside/outside, etc.) to be in opposition, each of the terms must be simply EXTERNAL to the other, which means that one of these oppositions (the opposition between inside and outside) must already be accredited as the matrix of all possible opposition.’ “

Peter J. Leithart

See also

Skewed Mirrors,
Sept. 14, 2003


“Evil did not  have the last word.”
Richard John Neuhaus, April 4, 2005

Lps. The keys to. Given! A way a lone
a last a loved a long the


PARIS,
1922-1939

“There is never any ending to Paris.”
— Ernest Hemingway

Thursday, April 7, 2005

Thursday April 7, 2005

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:26 PM

In the Details

Wallace Stevens,
An Ordinary Evening in New Haven:

XXII

Professor Eucalyptus said, “The search
For reality is as momentous as
The search for God.”  It is the philosopher’s search
For an interior made exterior
And the poet’s search for the same exterior made
Interior….

   … Likewise to say of the evening star,
The most ancient light in the most ancient sky,
That it is wholly an inner light, that it shines
From the sleepy bosom of the real, re-creates,
Searches a possible for its possibleness.

Julie Taymor, “Skewed Mirrors” interview:

“… they were performing for God. Now God can mean whatever you want it to mean. But for me, I understood it so totally. The detail….

They did it from the inside to the outside. And from the outside to the in. And that profoundly moved me then. It was…it was the most important thing that I ever experienced.”

Skewed Mirrors
illustrated:

Click on the above to enlarge.

Details:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050407-Messick2.png” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

The above may be of interest to students
of  iconology — what Dan Brown in
The Da Vinci Code calls “symbology” —
and of redheads.

The artist of Details,
“Brenda Starr” creator
Dale Messick, died on Tuesday,
April 5, 2005, at 98.

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050407-Messick.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.
AP Photo
Dale Messick in 1982

For further details on
April 5, see
Art History:
The Pope of Hope


Tuesday, April 5, 2005

Tuesday April 5, 2005

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 3:17 PM
Art History:
The Pope of Hope

At the Vatican on
Shakespeare's Birthday
(See Log24.net,
Oct. 4, 2002)

See also the iconology
what Dan Brown in
The Da Vinci Code
  calls "symbology" —
of Pandora's Box
at Log24.net,
March 10, 2005:

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050310-Nell2.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 

"Man and woman are a pair of locked caskets,
each containing the key to the other."

Baroness Karen Blixen

"Karol Wojtyla had looked into
the heart of darkness–
and at the heart of darkness
discovered reason
for an indomitable hope.

He lived on the far side of
the greatest catastrophe
in human history,
the death of the Son of God,
and knew that evil
did not have the last word.
This is the key…."

Richard John Neuhaus,
April 4, 2005

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050405-JoyceGeometry.gif” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Finnegans Wake, p. 293,
"the lazily eye of his lapis"

 

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix05/050403-StPetersSq3.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

 

Perette Elizabeth Michelli on the Ovato Tondo:

 

"Notice how the Pope turns out to be
at the center of the breaking and
redefining of the Classical system."

"Derrida on Plato on writing says 'In order for these contrary values (good/evil, true/false, essence/appearance, inside/outside, etc.) to be in opposition, each of the terms must be simply EXTERNAL to the other, which means that one of these oppositions (the opposition between inside and outside) must already be accredited as the matrix of all possible opposition.' "

Peter J. Leithart

See also


Skewed Mirrors
,
Sept. 14, 2003

"Evil did not  have the last word."
Richard John Neuhaus, April 4, 2005

Lps. The keys to. Given! A way a lone
a last a loved a long the

PARIS,
1922-1939

"There is never any ending to Paris."
— Ernest Hemingway

For the first word, see Louis Armand on
Lethe, erinnerung, and riverrun.

See also the following passage,
linked to on the Easter Vigil, 2005:

  You will find to the left of the House of Hades
    a spring,
  And by the side thereof standing
    a white cypress.
  To this spring approach not near.
  But you shall find another,
    from the lake of Memory
  Cold water flowing forth, and there are
    guardians before it.
  Say, "I am a child of Earth and starry Heaven;
  But my race is of Heaven alone.
    This you know yourselves.
  But I am parched with thirst and I perish.
    Give me quickly
  The cold water flowing forth
    from the lake of Memory."

Friday, January 9, 2004

Friday January 9, 2004

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:20 AM

Report to the
Joint Mathematics Meetings

“What was the lecture about,
Cosmo wanted to know.

‘It’s about solving equations
of the fifth degree,
which are supposed to be insoluble.'”

— Chapter 2 of
The Shadow Guests,
by Joan Aiken

For more material on insolubility
of fifth-degree equations
and on this winter’s
Joint Mathematics Meetings
(Phoenix, Jan. 7-10), see
the January 6 entry
720 in the Book.

For more material on Joan Aiken,
who died on January 4,
see the previous entry.

The number 720 is the order of
the symmetric group of degree 6.

For material related to
exceptional outer automorphisms
of this group and to
a song about Arizona, see

Skewed Mirrors.

Arizona Star:

“Shinin’ like a diamond
 she had tombstones
in her eyes.”

Monday, September 15, 2003

Monday September 15, 2003

Filed under: General — m759 @ 4:44 AM

Two More Skewed Mirrors

Background: Previous three entries and
The Crucifixion of John O’Hara.

  1. From The New Yorker,
    issue dated Sept. 22, 2003…

    John Updike on John O’Hara

    And yet the ultimate units of society, the human individuals lost within the crushing agglomeration of hostility, rivalry, snobbery, exclusion, and defeat that O’Hara felt in his bones, have aspirations and hopes and passions, and can be regarded with tenderness by a writer whose bleak and swift style seems at first not to care. A small story from “Files on Parade” (1939) titled “By Way of Yonkers” sticks in my mind as especially moving. Its two principals, the young woman unnamed and the man named only in the last sentence, exist on the lower levels of Depression survival. She, with her gunmetal stockings and Cossack hat and “neat, short nose with jigsaw nostrils,” seems to be a hooker. She arrives at the man’s shabby apartment so late that he tells her she must have come by way of Yonkers, and when he asks “How’d you do?” of the engagement that delayed her she not quite evades the question:

    “Oh—” she said it very high. Then: “All right. Financially. But do we have to talk about it? You and me?”

    She talks instead about her fading appetite for liquor, and the expense of dental care. He, lying inert and fully dressed on his bed, talks of being broke, of not wanting to take money from her, of how he can’t seem “to make a connection in this town.” The town is New York, and he is a minor gangster thrown out of work by the repeal of Prohibition. But he has met a man who offered him a connection in Milwaukee, and he is going to go there for a long time. The concluding words are unspectacular and unexpectedly sweeping:

    [She asks,] “Any chance you being back in town soon?”
    “Well, not right away, honey. First I have to build up my connection again.”
    “Well, I don’t have to tell you, I’m glad for you. It’s about time you got a good break.” She resumed rubbing his ankle. He put his hand on the top of her head.
    “Yeah? You’re as good a break as I ever got.”
    “Ah, Christ, Bill,” she said, and fell face down in tears.

    One is moved not only by their plight of presumably eternal separation but by the dignity that O’Hara, in a literary time of programmatic pro-proletarian advocacy (Odets and Steinbeck and Mike Gold), instinctively brings to his two specimens of lowlife. He does not view them politically, from above; he is there in the room with them, and one is moved by the unspoken presence of an author so knowing, so unjudgmental, so nearly an outcast himself.

  2. Johnny Cash singing “Hurt” —

    The video can be seen here.

Ah, Christ, Johnny.

Sunday, September 14, 2003

Sunday September 14, 2003

Filed under: General,Geometry — m759 @ 9:12 PM

Skewed Mirrors

Readings on Aesthetics
for the
Feast of the Triumph of the Cross

Part I

Bill Moyers and Julie Taymor

Director Taymor on her own passion play (see previous entry), “Frida“: 

“We always write stories of tragedies because that’s how we reach our human depth. How we get to the other side of it. We look at the cruelty, the darkness and horrific events that happened in our life whether it be a miscarriage or a husband who is not faithful. Then you find this ability to transcend. And that is called the passion, like the passion of Christ. You could call this the passion of Frida Kahlo, in a way.”

— 10/25/02 interview with Bill Moyers

From transcript
of 10/25/02
interview:

MOYERS: What happened to you in Indonesia.

TAYMOR: This is probably it for me. This is the story that moves me the most…. 

I went to Bali to a remote village by a volcanic mountain on the lake. They were having a ceremony that only happens only every 10 years for the young men. I wanted to be alone.

I was listening to this music and all of a sudden out of the darkness I could see glints of mirrors and 30 or 40 old men in full warrior costume– there was nobody in this village square. I was alone. They couldn’t see me in the shadows. They came out with these spears and they started to dance. They did, I don’t know, it felt like an eternity but probably a half hour dance. With these voices coming out of them. And they danced to nobody. Right after that, they and I went oh, my God. The first man came out and they were performing for God. Now God can mean whatever you want it to mean. But for me, I understood it so totally. The detail on the costumes. They didn’t care if someone was paying tickets, writing reviews. They didn’t care if an audience was watching. They did it from the inside to the outside. And from the outside to the in. And that profoundly moved me then.

MOYERS: How did you see the world differently after you were in Indonesia?

From transcript
of 11/29/02
interview:

….They did it from the inside to the outside. And from the outside to the in. And that profoundly moved me then. It was…it was the most important thing that I ever experienced. … 

…………………..

MOYERS: Now that you are so popular, now that your work is…

TAYMOR: [INAUDIBLE].

MOYERS: No, I’m serious.

 Now that you’re popular, now that your work is celebrated and people are seeking you, do you feel your creativity is threatened by that popularity or liberated by it?

TAYMOR: No, I think it’s neither one. I don’t do things any differently now than I would before.

And you think that sometimes perhaps if I get a bigger budget for a movie, then it will just be the same thing…

MOYERS: Ruination. Ruination.

TAYMOR: No, because LION KING is a combination of high tech and low tech.

There are things up on that stage that cost 30 cents, like a little shadow puppet and a lamp, and it couldn’t be any better than that. It just couldn’t.

Sometimes you are forced to become more creative because you have limitations. ….

TAYMOR: Well I understood really the power of art to transform.

I think transformation become the main word in my life.

Transformation because you don’t want to just put a mirror in front of people and say, here, look at yourself. What do you see?

 You want to have a skewed mirror. You want a mirror that says you didn’t know you could see the back of your head. You didn’t know that you could amount cubistic see almost all the same aspects at the same time.

It allows human beings to step out of their lives and to revisit it and maybe find something different about it.

It’s not about the technology. It’s about the power of art to transform.

I think transformation becomes the main word in my life, transformation.

Because you don’t want to just put a mirror in front of people and say, here, look at yourself. What do you see?

You want to have a skewed mirror. You want a mirror that says, you didn’t know you could see the back of your head. You didn’t know that you could…almost cubistic, see all aspects at the same time.

And what that does for human beings is it allows them to step out of their lives and to revisit it and maybe find something different about it.

Part II

 Inside and Outside: Transformation

(Research note, July 11, 1986)

Click on the above typewritten note to enlarge.

Summary of
Parts I and II:


See also
Geometry for Jews.

“We’re not here to stick a mirror on you. Anybody can do that, We’re here to give you a more cubist or skewed mirror, where you get to see yourself with fresh eyes. That’s what an artist does. When you paint the Crucifixion, you’re not painting an exact reproduction.”

Julie Taymor on “Frida” (AP, 10/22/02)

“She made ‘real’ an oxymoron, 
         she made mirrors, she made smoke.
She had a curve ball
          that wouldn’t quit,
                              a girlfriend for a joke.”

— “Arizona Star,” Guy Clark / Rich Alves

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