Log24

Friday, May 24, 2019

Mystery at Santa Fe

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:59 PM


A mysterious Google Search result from this evening —

A check of Marshall's announcement reveals an apparent
contradiction to the reported May 24 date of death. Although the
announcement says  that Gell-Mann died on May 24, the announcement
itself is timestamped midnight (00:00) at the beginning  of May 24 
according to Greenwich Mean Time, i.e., at 6 pm May 23 in Santa Fe —


This may or may not help to illustrate the Gell-Mann amnesia effect.

Friday, June 28, 2019

A Velvet Buzzsaw*

Filed under: General — m759 @ 7:40 PM

Logo of the Santa Fe Institute

* See posts tagged The Malkovich Pictures.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Bit Plot

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 1:40 AM

From a May 15 review of a new book by Douglas Coupland, author of
the 1991 book Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture .

"Minimalists are actually extreme hoarders:
 they hoard space." — Douglas Coupland

The title of Coupland's new book suggests a review of Schmeikal 
in this  journal

Coupland's above remark on hoarders suggests a look at
a wealthy California collector whom, were he not wealthy,
some might call a hoarder.

“I buy things because they strike an emotional bell,
they appeal to my curiosity, to the thrill of discovery
of the extraordinary in the ordinary,” Mr. Cotsen told
The Denver Post in 1998. “They appeal to my sense
of humor, and to my search for the beauty in simplicity.”

He added, “I decided I had a collection when there was
no more space to put anything.”

By the time he died at 88 on May 8 in Beverly Hills, Calif.,
Mr. Cotsen (pronounced COAT-zen) had donated about
half of the material in his collections to institutions like the
Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, Princeton University
and the Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, N.M.

Richard Sandomir in the online New York Times , May 17

Cotsen reportedly died at 88 on May 8. 

See also this  journal on that date —

Monday, May 8, 2017

New Pinterest Board

Filed under: Uncategorized — m759 @ 9:29 PM 

https://www.pinterest.com/stevenhcullinane/art-space/

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Super Overarching Symmetry

Filed under: General — m759 @ 12:48 PM

(Continued)

Santa Fe Institute logo (see previous post) —

Symmetry , by Hermann Weyl

The image “http://www.log24.com/log/pix06/060319-Weyl.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Scoring Plan 9

Filed under: General — Tags: , — m759 @ 6:33 PM

In keeping with the resurrection themes of the
previous post and of "Plan 9 from Outer Space,"
here is a link to the soundtrack of "Field of Dreams."

Related material:

A post of March 11, 2014, on
truth, cornfields, and Rebecca Goldstein —
Dark Fields of the Republic.

R.I.P., James Horner.

Easter Monday 2012

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 12:00 PM

Rebecca Goldstein, the author mentioned in
the previous two posts, spoke at Santa Fe Institute
on Easter Monday, April 9, 2012.

This journal on that date:

Logos

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 11:09 AM

The Santa Fe Institute logo, together with the previous post,
suggests a review of Whirligig and Quaternion for Goldstein.

Monday, June 22, 2015

Plato for Rebecca Goldstein

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: , — m759 @ 10:24 AM

"… geometry will draw the soul towards truth…." — Plato

Or not.

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

The Hallowed Crucible

Filed under: General — m759 @ 10:30 PM

(Continued)

A meditation suggested by the April 20 post Complex Reflection
and by the life and April 20 death of a scientist who worked
at Los Alamos (home of the Monte Carlo method) and at
the Santa Fe Institute (home of complexity theory).

IMAGE- The NY lottery results for midday April 20, 2012, were 0286 and 823.

A search for 286 in this journal yields "Yet Another Cartoon Graveyard."

That June 1, 2008, post linked to poem  286 in a 1919 anthology.

Here is that poem, together with poem 823.

Together, these poems may be regarded as a meditation on
Simone Weil and her brother André Weil or, 
more abstractly, on Love and Death.

Happy birthday to Al Pacino.

Monday, April 9, 2012

Easter Act

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 10:00 AM

Acts 12:4 —  

"And when he had apprehended him,
he put him  in prison, and delivered him 
to four quaternions of soldiers to keep him;
intending after Easter to bring him forth to the people."

With six you get egg roll.

Wednesday, August 5, 2009

Wednesday August 5, 2009

Filed under: General,Geometry — Tags: — m759 @ 11:30 AM

 

Word and Image

NYT obituary summaries for Charles Gwathmey and Edward Hall, morning of Aug. 5, 2009

From Hall's obituary
:

"Edward T. Hall, a cultural anthropologist
who pioneered the study of nonverbal
 communication and interactions between
members of different ethnic groups,
 died July 20 at his home in
 Santa Fe, N.M. He was 95."

NY Times piece quoted here on
 the date of Hall's death:
 

"July 20, 1969, was the moment NASA needed, more than anything else in this world, the Word. But that was something NASA's engineers had no specifications for. At this moment, that remains the only solution to recovering NASA's true destiny, which is, of course, to build that bridge to the stars."

— Tom Wolfe, author of The Right Stuff, an account of the Mercury Seven astronauts.

Commentary
The Word according to St. John:

Jill St. John, star of 'Diamonds are Forever'

 

From Hall's obituary:

"Mr. Hall first became interested in
space and time as forms of cultural
 expression while working on
Navajo and Hopi reservations
 in the 1930s."

Log24, July 29
:

Changing Woman:

"Kaleidoscope turning…

Juliette Binoche in 'Blue'  The 24 2x2 Cullinane Kaleidoscope animated images

Shifting pattern within   
unalterable structure…"
— Roger Zelazny,  
Eye of Cat  

"We are the key."
Eye of Cat  

Update of about 4:45 PM 8/5:

Paul Newall, "Kieślowski's Three Colours Trilogy"

"Julie recognises the music of the busker outside playing a recorder as that of her husband's. When she asks him where he heard it, he replies that he makes up all sorts of things. This is an instance of a theory of Kieślowski's that 'different people, in different places, are thinking the same thing but for different reasons.' With regard to music in particular, he held what might be characterised as a Platonic view according to which notes pre-exist and are picked out and assembled by people. That these can accord with one another is a sign of what connects people, or so he believed."

The above photo of Juliette Binoche in Blue accompanying the quotations from Zelazny illustrates Kieślowski's concept, with graphic designs instead of musical notes. Some of the same designs are discussed in Abstraction and the Holocaust (Mark Godfrey, Yale University Press, 2007). (See the Log24 entries of June 11, 2009.)

Related material:

"Jeffrey Overstreet, in his book Through a Screen Darkly, comments extensively on Blue. He says these stones 'are like strands of suspended crystalline tears, pieces of sharp-edged grief that Julie has not been able to express.'….

Throughout the film the color blue crops up, highlighting the mood of Julie's grief. A blue light occurs frequently, when Julie is caught by some fleeting memory. Accompanied by strains of an orchestral composition, possibly her husband's, these blue screen shots hold for several seconds while Julie is clearly processing something. The meaning of this blue light is unexplained. For Overstreet, it is the spirit of reunification of broken things."

Martin Baggs at Mosaic Movie Connect Group on Sunday, March 15, 2009. (Cf. Log24 on that date.)

For such a spirit, compare Binoche's blue mobile in Blue with Binoche's gathered shards in Bee Season.

Wednesday, July 5, 2006

Wednesday July 5, 2006

Filed under: General — Tags: — m759 @ 3:00 PM
Entertainment
from today’s
New York Times

From the obituary of Lorraine Hunt Lieberson, who died at 52 on Monday, July 3, 2006, at her home in Santa Fe:

“If she rarely spoke of her private life, few artists have brought such emotional vulnerability to their work, whether it was her sultry portrayal of Myrtle Wilson, the mistress of wealthy Tom Buchanan in John Harbison’s ‘Great Gatsby,’ the role of her 1999 Metropolitan Opera debut, or her shattering performances several years ago in two Bach cantatas for solo voice and orchestra, staged by the director Peter Sellars, seen in Lincoln Center’s New Visions series, with the Orchestra of Emmanuel Music, Craig Smith conducting.

In Cantata No. 82, ‘Ich Habe Genug’ (‘I Have Enough’), Ms. Hunt Lieberson, wearing a flimsy hospital gown and thick woolen socks, her face contorted with pain and yearning, portrayed a terminally ill patient who, no longer able to endure treatments, wants to let go and be comforted by Jesus. During one consoling aria, ‘Schlummert ein, ihr matten Augen’ (‘Slumber now, weary eyes’), she yanked tubes from her arms and sang the spiraling melody with an uncanny blend of ennobling grace and unbearable sadness.”

Related Entertainment
from Nov. 6, 2003

Today’s birthday:
director Mike Nichols

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